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There's a very likely possibility that ill be traveling in Europe and I always wonder this. I wasn't quite vegan in high school but I didn't eat eggs or animal flesh but when I did a homestay program in Costa rica, I ate eggs. I didn't want to but the mom went out of her way the first night to get a vegetarian cookbook and I guess she didn't understand that I didn't eat eggs (my Spanish was also very rusty) and she made them so I just ate them. I didn't want to be a burden. I'm planning on going to Spain mainly but also othtr parts of Europe. I remember an article on vegan restaurants in Madrid in vegnews magazine a while back (I saved it) so there's that but I'm wondering how difficult it will be to be vegan in places like Spain and Italy. I think it would be very difficult and probably unhealthy if the same resources aren't there for me, not to mention that food is a huge part of those cultures<br><br>
What would you do or Have you done? Are the animals treated better in those places? As far as I know factory farms aren't common there, but I could be misinformed. Tell me what you think
 

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To be honest, I'd brush up on the language(s) and make sure my wants are known. But I'm not a person who would rely on others for anything, necessarily, so it'd be hard to put my food/needs in the hands of another. For real, that must have been tough. My feeling (just my own) is I'd rather be viewed as a temporary "burden" to the woman in obtaining other food besides eggs than contribute to the burden the animals used for my (omni) food would have.<br><br>
(my reasons for being vegan isn't just the existence of factory farming, so even if i found animal industries in those places better comparable to the horrid conditions in the u.s. (which isn't saying much), i still wouldn't eat animal products, nor do i find them to be appetizing, nourishing, or "food.")<br><br>
those places will have fruit, veg, nuts, and seeds; right?
 

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Agreed that a bit of language prep can go a long way. You can order a vegan passport here: <a href="http://www.vegetarianguides.co.uk/products/veganpassport.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.vegetarianguides.co.uk/pr...passport.shtml</a>, but you can probably find applicable phrases on Google too. Happy Cow has suggestions on each of their country pages as well.<br><br>
The things with factory farms is that you're just not going to know. Factory farms exist all over Europe, though I'd agree that in many places they are less common than in the US. However, when you're in a Spanish cafe eating an omelet, you don't know. Ditto on things like whether the cheese is suitable for vegetarians, etc.<br><br>
When you go to Europe, are you going to be doing homestays, etc. or traveling on your own? Honestly, if you're on your own, I think you can probably do okay between learning a bit of the language(s) and stocking up on some backups when you're able. In the big cities, you'll definitely be able to find something to eat. It may not be haute cuisine, but I can't imagine you'd starve. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> If you're headed out to the countryside, stock up on some dried fruits/nuts/protein bars, etc...whatever you can find at the cityside health food shops.<br><br>
The man and I stick with veganism when traveling. It's a bit more "work", but sometimes we end up having something fabulous that the chef whips up for us. We even managed to have an nice vegan meal in Bosnia!
 

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I didn't eat animal products the 3 weeks i was in Barcelona in 2005 and the 4 months a was studying in and traveling around Spain in 2009. Your choices will be limited if you're like me and only eat at traditional restaurants and doner kebaps (i didn't eat at any veg restaurants even tho they have them in most cities). My options were pretty much limited to gazpacho, salad, pasta, patatas bravas, bread, and falafel. However, if you can make some of your own meals then you have a world of choice. Plus there are plenty of things you can buy at a market to snack on such as fruit, veg, nuts (frutos secos), Mister Corn, and cheese-less Cheetos.<br><br>
Factory farming's a bit better in the EU but it's still pretty cruel. Spain has a traditional ham, Jamón Ibérico, that comes from free living pigs that eat acorns and i think the meat comes out to be about $15 per pound. I don't know if the pigs and their mothers are free roaming their entire lives nor i know if there is more intensively farmed ham being sold as jamón ibérico.<br><br>
I found this blog yesterday and i haven't read thru this post yet but it may help you.<br><a href="http://www.fluentin3months.com/travelling-vegetarian/" target="_blank">http://www.fluentin3months.com/travelling-vegetarian/</a>
 

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Spain <a href="http://www.happycow.net/europe/spain/" target="_blank">http://www.happycow.net/europe/spain/</a><br><br>
Italy: <a href="http://www.happycow.net/europe/italy/" target="_blank">http://www.happycow.net/europe/italy/</a>
 

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The size of factory farms is not the same in the US and in Europe, but the principles are definitely the same. Sometimes less cruel perhaps, meaning cages 1 inch bigger, but all in all, it's the same.<br>
The vegan passport will be useful, as IamJen mentionned. And you'll find loads of fruits and veggies in markets, whatever the country. It might be a good opportunity to try raw food for a while <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br>
Finding vegetarian restaurants or restaurants with vegetarian options is definitely much easier in main cities compared to the countryside (where more often than not the word vegetarian or vegan is hardly ever known)<br>
Will you be on your own? Homestay?<br>
Anyway, Europe is not a 3rd world country eating only animals to survive, so you will be fine, even tough it might be hard from time to time, depending on where you are <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> But I suppose it's the same as in the US, in NY it's easy, in rural redneck areas, it's harder !
 

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I agree with Fushichô, the differences between U.S. and European farmings are negligible. We don't have CAFO (as far as I know) but the "living" conditions are not better in the slightest.<br>
You'll find plenty to eat, as others have told you, unfortunately, you haven't picked up the easiest countries when it comes to veganism (as most Latin countries, I dare say). So be ready to be considered as the weirdest person ever seen.<br>
If you can find your way to Germany or to the U.K. though, it will be way better there (and remember to avoid France at all cost ^^, they don't even know what veganism is there! ).
 

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Hi Jezebel! Nice to see you here! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
According to someone who's currently travelling around the world and has been in South America for a few months, and who is vegan (FYI Jezebel, I'm talking about lelfe), the ones criticising her veganism are almost always... French, rarely locals or tourists of other nationalities...<br>
Sometimes I believe Al Bundy is right when he blames everything on the French, we are indeed a bad people as a whole. ^^
 

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Hey Fuchichô! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br>
Dear all France... Problably why you and I are not living there anymore... :p<br>
Here in China (where meat consumtion is becoming more and more important everyday <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("> ) it's the same, people are very understanding and do their best to accomodate my needs. The few Americans I'm aquainted with are also wonderful. So all in all I'm not really surprised about Lelfe's experience in Latin America.<br><br>
As for Spain and Italy, I haven't exêrienced them as a vegan myself, so it's just hearsay from some of my friends but it didn't go well for them as far as I can remember (but they had some constraints though).
 

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Having lived in France as a foreigner and been vegan for 3 months it is do-able! Especially in summer, fresh fruit from Market stalls, fresh bread from the bakers, aubergine pate, jam, dark chocolate, carrot salad and taboule from the supermarket, were the kind of things I'd eat in an unfamiliar place when I couldn't cook. I was in Florence, Italy shortly before going vegan and we ate in an awesome veg cafe with vegan options twice (the two omnis I was with actually chose to go there over other Italian restaurants) and I've been told a lot of ice cream shops offer soya options.<br><br>
Thinking about it there are also health food/ co op shops in most major European cities that sell fake sandwich meats, soy cheese, biscuits, marzipan dark chocolate etc. Certainly I've found these all over France and in Germany.<br><br>
Europe as a vegan is definitely do-able.
 

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@ Lucky_charm:<br><br>
Of course it's do-able even in France <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> But it's really going to depend on where you are in France too. Fushichô and I are both French, so that's why we were joking about it: we know the difficulty of being vegan there.<br><br>
If you are in the country side, finding suitable food can be difficult. As for most restaurants, you can forget it, as people don't even know what veganism is. French people are still pretty distrusful of any kind of diet which is not branded as "normal" or traditionnal.<br><br>
I don't know how it is in the rest of Europe but in France veganism is on par with being in a cult... Go figure...
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Jezebel</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2942471"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
@ Lucky_charm:<br><br>
Of course it's do-able even in France <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> But the mentality is re</div>
</div>
<br>
I think you got cut off <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> but just wanted to add that while I was in France my French friends were really sweet and open minded and one of the girls I barely knew even had a 'vegan night' to experiment with the fun of vegan cooking. I think food in general is a big deal in France and because France is so famous for cheeses, meats, gourmet cuisine, crepes, gateaus, etc I think some people may feel that avoiding those things was an insult to French culture.
 

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I absolutely would not give up being vegan abroad if I could at all help it. Europe is fairly easy; the majority of people speak at least a little english, and whilst they may not know the term 'vegan' you should at least be able to convey no meat, no eggs, no dairy fairly successfully. The only problem may be trace ingredients, but you should be fine. A friend of mine just got back from Spain and managed to stay vegetarian and eat mostly vegan without trying.
 

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I do have to travel for my job sometimes. I don't stop being vegan, but I'm more likely to give a food the benefit of the doubt if I'm traveling and stuck with few options. I know how foods are normally cooked, and what normal ingredients are for certain things. I'll grab a something and eat it without demanding that someone wake up the head chef to get the key to the supplies closet so I can make sure that my bowl of corn flakes don't have any stray animal ingredients.<br><br>
There is something else I do that'll make a lot of vegans fuss at me. If I'm pressed for time, I have a small window of opportunity to grab and eat food, and I'll likely not be able to eat again for 6 or more hours... And, I open my Fresco Style Bean Burrito from a Taco Bell and discover that they left the cheese on (Fresco replaces the cheese with fresh salsa)... I will go ahead and eat it...cheese and all. A lot of vegans will simply choose not to eat, but that just isn't an option for me.
 

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I'd do a lot of research first and plan places to get food and try to learn enough of the language to make myself understood. Plus I'm pretty good at making meals out of nothing, I wouldn't mind being stuck with only fruits and vegetables and rice for awhile if necessary.
 

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I'm going to Disneyland in Anaheim Ca in a couple of months, and will be going for the first time since going Vegan almost a month ago. Am I concerned about it...a little, but I intend on taking some Vegan snacks that I know will go through security at the airport with no problems, and don't have a problem eating fruit and salads during the time that I'm down there, if it means that I'm staying Vegan. I don't have a problem asking that food be made Vegan, as it can be simple as leaving the cheese and eggs off a salad. But I will have to be careful in what I do eat there.
 

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I was in Italy for about 3 weeks and didn't have a problem finding vegan food, so no I wouldn't drop by diet or habits (of avoiding animal products).<br><br>
I'm sure some places might be more challenging, but I would try to do a lot of research first (as others have already stated).
 

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No. I traveled a month ago for a couple of weeks and got by. Albeit, I was probably slightly malnourished and probably not getting enough protein, but no point to become a hypocrite.
 

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No I wouldn't stop being vegan.<br><br>
As far as how animals are treated in Spain, Igualdad Animal can tell you all about it. You don't have to be able to read Spanish to understand the suffering the animals go through on the farms there. <a href="http://www.igualdadanimal.org/" target="_blank">http://www.igualdadanimal.org/</a>
 

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I would do my absolute best to remain vegan. I went on a weeklong trip shortly after going vegan and didn't have any problems at all, although I can understand that it might be more difficult in situations where there is a language barrier. Still, I would do my best.
 
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