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If we eat it then so does that sweet little babie we are holding. On the other hand, if the child is bottle fed then every dang thing the cow has ever eaten or been injected with is eaten by the equally innicent child sucking on a bottle.
 

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dioxins are the same things found in the bleach that they use on tampons. apparently, the risks are lower now...but there must be some correlations there. (there's a ton on this in the "birds and bees--women's health" thread on this site).

I never knew tampons were so dangerous. I ordered a moon cup after I read all that.

http://www.mooncup.co.uk/

its the same as the "keeper" they discuss on that thread.

its a long thread with tons of messages, but VERY good information for women that are concerned about dioxins, passing that on to babies, etc.

XOXO

beth
 

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Women pass dioxins on to their children via breast feeding! The proportion is highest in meat and fish-eating women, only asmall proportion is found in vegan livin women. Even with passing dioxins, breast feeding remains the natural diet for babies.
 

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http://theglobeandmail.com/servlet/s...tory/National/

Girls warned to cut back on meat, whole milk

By ANDRÉ PICARD

From Thursday's Globe and Mail

Girls should markedly cut back their consumption of red meat, poultry and whole milk to reduce their exposure to dioxin, a chemical that can build up in the body and, in their childbearing years, harm their babies, a U.S. scientific panel says.

The Institute of Medicine, in a report released yesterday, said that teaching girls to cut their fat intake is the most efficient way to reduce the risk to the next generation.

Dioxins are believed to cause developmental problems and increase susceptibility to cancer, but the levels at which they become dangerous are unclear.

"Because the risks posed by the amount of dioxins found in foods have yet to be determined, we are recommending simple, prudent steps to reduce dioxin exposure while data are gathered that will clarify the risks," said Robert Lawrence, the associate dean at the school of public health of Johns Hopkins University and chairman of the IOM committee that prepared the report.

Dioxins are chemical compounds produced when material is burned. They are ubiquitous in the environment, but accumulate in the fatty tissues of animals. People are exposed principally by eating animal fats, including beef, chicken, fatty fish, whole milk and eggs. The IOM committee said aboriginal people including those in Canada's North who eat a diet rich in wild game and fish are at particular risk, and should heed the counsel for girls to cut back on their fat intake.

The levels of dioxins in the breast milk of women in Canada's Far North is five-times higher than among women in the south.

Last year, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency tested food sold in Canadian supermarkets such as beef, pork and eggs and found dioxins and other carcinogenic chemicals in about 80 per cent of samples.

Dr. Lawrence said the committee cannot set acceptable levels of dioxin consumption for two reasons: The scientific evidence is lacking, and the tests to determine dioxin levels are extremely expensive. It can cost up to $1,000 to check a single piece of meat.

"We refrained from setting any risk-tolerance limits or mandatory cutoff points because it would have been cost prohibitive," he said.

In addition to having girls change their dietary habits, the committee also recommended that food companies and farmers increase their efforts to curb dioxin levels in food, notably by reducing the prevalence of dioxins in animal feed. The panel said additional research is needed to track the effects of dioxins on children.

Earlier this week, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reported that 150 kilograms of dioxins were released into the atmosphere in the United States in 2001, up from 100 a year earlier.

But, since the 1970s, dioxin levels have decreased sharply by about 76 per cent according to the EPA.

Dioxin levels are also believed to have fallen in food, but breastfeeding rates have soared dioxins accumulate in breast milk because it is fatty meaning the risk to babies is actually greater.
 

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When I first read this, I tought the Institute of Medicine was just some issue group that gave themselves a fancy sounding name to promote their health views. Not bc I don't believe what they are saying, I am just surprised that there would be such a strongly worded report as this from a widely recognized and respected group. The Institute of Medicine is part of the Academy of the Sciences. A very well known and respected group.
 

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I'd like to see that posted on ConAgra's or Cargill's (I forget which) little website trying to entice girls into eating meat, the bastards. With this paper, we should sue their asses.
 

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The problem with dioxins is that they stay unchanged in the ecosystem for a long time. They accumulate in the foodchain and that´s the reason, why you find high levels up in the north (icebears, seals, people living there, or people still eating meat and fish.
 
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