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Should I buy energy efficient light bulbs now?

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Is there some more to this question?<br><br><br><br>
"Yes, you should drop whatever you're doing this very instant and run, not walk, to your local hardware store and stock up on ee light bulbs."
 

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yes there is no reason not to. They are cheaper as they last longer and use less energy than the old fashioned ones. They also come in many shapes to fit your shades. They also light up instantly, not like the early ones that toke a few seconds.
 

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Yes, you should. Why not?<br><br><br><br>
However, there are some reasons not to use such bulbs in all applications.<br><br><br><br>
One is that the nature of the light they produce is different from that produced by incandescent bulbs. I put one in a ceiling fixture for a friend and she claims that she can't stand the type of light it produces.<br><br><br><br>
Second, many of these bulbs do not work properly with dimmer switches nor with the controls designed to turn lights off at dawn and on at dusk.<br><br><br><br>
Third, some of them do not fit in some light fixtures.<br><br><br><br>
Fourth, some lamp shades are designed to clip onto an incandescent bulb, so will not fit on bulbs shaped differently.<br><br><br><br>
Fifth, these types of bulbs do not work with "signal flasher" devices and other similar devices, which are designed to work with incandescent lights only.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>thehappyhippo</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
yes there is no reason not to. They are cheaper as they last longer and use less energy than the old fashioned ones. They also come in many shapes to fit your shades. They also light up instantly, not like the early ones that toke a few seconds.</div>
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I don't know where you shop but they cost like $6-$8 a bulb here.. whereas conventional bulbs cost about $1/ea.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>rabid_child</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I don't know where you shop but they cost like $6-$8 a bulb here.. whereas conventional bulbs cost about $1/ea.</div>
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I think (s)he meant that they're cheaper in the long run, as they last for years, whereas incandescent bulbs are only good for about 1 year, so you won't have to replace them as often. Plus, they use less electricity and thus save money from your bill. It's like saying that a menstrual cup is cheaper than disposable pads.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>thehappyhippo</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
They also light up instantly, not like the early ones that toke a few seconds.</div>
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WHOA. I so want these toking light bulbs!!!!<br><br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>rabid_child</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I don't know where you shop but they cost like $6-$8 a bulb here.. whereas conventional bulbs cost about $1/ea.</div>
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Go to IKEA if you can - they're super cheap there.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>OregonAmy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Go to IKEA if you can - they're super cheap there.</div>
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I second this. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/yes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":yes:">
 

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I'm not trying to argue with Joe, I just wanted to make a couple comments/side notes.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Joe</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Yes, you should. Why not?<br><br><br><br>
However, there are some reasons not to use such bulbs in all applications.<br><br><br><br>
One is that the nature of the light they produce is different from that produced by incandescent bulbs. I put one in a ceiling fixture for a friend and she claims that she can't stand the type of light it produces.<br></div>
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There are a variety of different spectrum cfl lights (I assume that is what is meant by 'energy efficient light bulbs'). Just because one brand or bulb has a color issue, doesn't mean they all do. There's full spectrum as well as a variety of different temperature 'colors'.<br><br><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Joe</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Second, many of these bulbs do not work properly with dimmer switches nor with the controls designed to turn lights off at dawn and on at dusk.<br></div>
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This is something to be concerned with, however there are cfls which will state <i>specifically</i> if they can work on dimmer switches.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Joe</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Third, some of them do not fit in some light fixtures.<br><br><br><br>
Fourth, some lamp shades are designed to clip onto an incandescent bulb, so will not fit on bulbs shaped differently.<br></div>
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Good points, but as a side note some cfls are being 'wrapped' to look like a normal incandescent bulb, as well as there are 'mini' cfls which can fit into smaller fixtures. One just has to shop around, to find the right cfl for the job.
 

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I also heard that in order to dispose of them, you need to find out how to dispose of hazardous materials because the contain mercury. I believe this might be in the ballast which is included inside the screw in ones. bulbs made for flourescent lamps would not have this mercury, but they do have some weird gas inside.<br><br><br><br>
Not a reason to not buy them though. Be careful, some are better than others. I found some that are very cheap don't last long, and in some cases, started smoking! (I guess those ones should get together with the toking bulbs) (one of these brands was sunbeam, so cheaper does not equal better) I read poor reviews of "lights of america" I would recommend reading reviews before investing a lot of money.<br><br><br><br>
If you can only buy a few at a time, replace most frequently used lights first as well as bulbs that are hard to change. You can also take them with you when you move (as I have done!) There are variations in light quality, again, I'd read reviews.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=7543075" target="_blank">http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...toryId=7543075</a>
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>OregonAmy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Go to IKEA if you can - they're super cheap there.</div>
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I believe the six+ hrs in driving necessary to get to an IKEA and back would negate any environmental benefits of owning the lightbulb.<br><br><br><br>
That being said, we do have them.. they just cost a heck of a lot more up front.
 

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Remi and I were talking about this thread earlier today... He mentioned LED lights as up & coming.<br><br><br><br>
Here's an interesting site:<br><br><a href="http://www.environmentallights.com/" target="_blank">http://www.environmentallights.com/</a>
 

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LEDs are definitely the hot new direction in lighting. They are finally getting bright enough to use in general applications. They're also starting to get the color right...
 

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yes ...but does anyone go and buy them <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/brood.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":brood:">
 

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we have the energy efficient lightbulbs thru our whole house, i have not noticed any significant change in my electric bill, pretty much the same.<br><br>
and they make me nervous because if you accidently break one you are exposed to mercury vapors, its in the gas i believe........and you do have to dispose of them properly, you cant just throw them in the trash because they break when they are disposed of and the mercury emitted then.<br><br>
i am not that convinced on them just because i havent noticed a change in my electric bill, and we have been using them for a couple years now.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>thehappyhippo</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
yes there is no reason not to. They are cheaper as they last longer and use less energy than the old fashioned ones. They also come in many shapes to fit your shades. They also light up instantly, not like the early ones that toke a few seconds.</div>
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I want in on this! We bought ours years ago (proof they last a while) and my lights take so much longer to come on than the lights in any of my friends' houses <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/brood.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":brood:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Bonoluvr</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
we have the energy efficient lightbulbs thru our whole house, i have not noticed any significant change in my electric bill, pretty much the same.<br><br>
and they make me nervous because if you accidently break one you are exposed to mercury vapors, its in the gas i believe........and you do have to dispose of them properly, you cant just throw them in the trash because they break when they are disposed of and the mercury emitted then.<br><br>
i am not that convinced on them just because i havent noticed a change in my electric bill, and we have been using them for a couple years now.</div>
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If like me there is a change in your bill we are not talking about £5-£10 a month, but more like up to a £1-£2 a month. As they last much longer as well you save more money that way.<br><br><br><br>
Mercury vapours are a concern but I have been using them for over a decade and have not had a single one break. During that time I have been hit by three cars (thankfully 2 minor one and 1 head banging one) so in the whole scheme of things they are not that dangerous when compared to the risks we take every day.<br><br><br><br>
Also in the USA these bulbs can be legally disposed of in the normal rubbish as they are categorized as household hazardous waste (<a href="http://www.eartheasy.com/live_energyeff_lighting.htm)" target="_blank">http://www.eartheasy.com/live_energyeff_lighting.htm)</a>.<br><br><br><br>
This is an interesting site with lots of facts n figure to drool over.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=cfls.pr_cfls" target="_blank">http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=cfls.pr_cfls</a><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>isowish</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I want in on this! We bought ours years ago (proof they last a while) and my lights take so much longer to come on than the lights in any of my friends' houses <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/brood.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":brood:"></div>
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hehe the joy with long lasting bulbs is that by the time you get the next lot you get a MUCH more advanced one. The worse part is the temptation of upgrading the current ones when they still work.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>thehappyhippo</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><br>
Also in the USA these bulbs can be legally disposed of in the normal rubbish as they are categorized as household hazardous waste (<a href="http://www.eartheasy.com/live_energyeff_lighting.htm)" target="_blank">http://www.eartheasy.com/live_energyeff_lighting.htm)</a>.<br></div>
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I think this statement is highly doubtful. Plus, I think you have the reasoning "backwards."<br><br><br><br>
Here is what the site you cited states:<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
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Handling and Disposal of CFL's<br><br><br><br>
Compact fluorescent bulbs contain small amounts of mercury. The mercury poses no threat while in the bulb, but if you break one be careful not to inhale the mercury - immediately use a wet rag to clean it up and put all of the pieces, and the rag, into a plastic bag.<br><br><br><br>
Although household CFL bulbs may legally be disposed of with regular trash (in the US), they are categorized as household hazardous waste. As long as the waste is sent to a modern municipal landfill, the hazard to the environment is limited. However, CFL's should not be sent to an incinerator, which would disperse the mercury into the atmosphere.<br><br><br><br>
The best solution is to save spent CFL's for a community household hazardous waste collection, which would then send the bulbs to facilities capable of treating, recovering or recycling them. For more information on CFL disposal or recycling, you can contact your local municipality.<br></div>
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I think it is questionable whether these bulbs can legally be disposed of in the regular trash.<br><br><br><br>
But they are classified as household hazardous waste.<br><br><br><br>
Normally household hazardous waste can<span style="text-decoration:underline;">not</span> be legally disposed of in the regular trash.<br><br><br><br>
So, <b>if</b> these bulbs can be legally disposed of in the regular trash, then it would be <b>in spite of</b> the fact that they are classified as household hazardous waste, <span style="text-decoration:underline;">not because of this fact</span>.<br><br><br><br>
Since just about every household generates some type of hazardous waste and this waste cannot legally be put into the regular trash, just about every household will have a container for such waste and will take the container to an appropriate facility or drop-off point to handle such waste. So, these bulbs should also be handled in the same way.<br><br><br><br>
To repeat what was said on the site you cited:<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">The best solution is to save spent CFL's for a community household hazardous waste collection, which would then send the bulbs to facilities capable of treating, recovering or recycling them.</div>
</div>
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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Thalia</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I also heard that in order to dispose of them, you need to find out how to dispose of hazardous materials because the contain mercury. I believe this might be in the ballast which is included inside the screw in ones. bulbs made for <b>flourescent lamps would not have this mercury, but they do have some weird gas inside.</b><br><br>
Not a reason to not buy them though. Be careful, some are better than others. I found some that are very cheap don't last long, and in some cases, started smoking! (I guess those ones should get together with the toking bulbs) (one of these brands was sunbeam, so cheaper does not equal better) I read poor reviews of "lights of america" I would recommend reading reviews before investing a lot of money.<br><br><br><br>
If you can only buy a few at a time, replace most frequently used lights first as well as bulbs that are hard to change. You can also take them with you when you move (as I have done!) There are variations in light quality, again, I'd read reviews.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=7543075" target="_blank">http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...toryId=7543075</a></div>
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all flourescant bulbs have mercury in them and should be treated as a hazadorous waste..... even those long tube ones used in garages and shops.
 
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