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Why do people switch to a raw foods diet?
One well-researched book about raw vegan nutrition is "Becoming Raw", by Brenda Davis and Vesanto Melina: https://www.amazon.com/Becoming-Raw-Essential-Guide-Vegan/dp/1570672385 .

Davis and Melina are both long-time vegan Registered Dietitians. This book is well-substantiated, with hundreds of citations of peer-reviewed studies. The authors explain the nutrition, the benefits, and the potential pitfalls of raw vegan diets.
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There are various reasons and benefits to eat raw, get few as following from my thoughts 1) While cooking, heat decimate the foods nutrients and natural minerals which are present in them. 2) It saves lot of money and time too.
How? Unless you are dumpster diving often, I don't see how it would be cheaper than eating cooked foods considering you have to eat a lot to get enough calories.
Some of the cheapest foods are foods you can't have in a raw diet (rice, beans, pasta...).
 

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Some of the cheapest foods are foods you can't have in a raw diet (rice, beans, pasta...).
Exceptions are always there

Lectin is a protein that serves as a natural insecticide with a strong affinity for carbohydrates. Found on uncooked rice and beans, this protein is one of the top 10 causes of food poisoning and can lead to nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting when eaten in abundance. This arises from lectin's prevention of the repair of gastrointestinal cells that are damaged when eating.

The Bacillus cereus bacterium is found in a variety of foods, with different strains associated with a host of potential health benefits and negative side effects. Some strains of this bacterium compete with other bacteria in the digestive system, serving as a probiotic and reducing the amount of potentially harmful bacteria such as salmonella.
 

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Exceptions are always there

Lectin is a protein that serves as a natural insecticide with a strong affinity for carbohydrates. Found on uncooked rice and beans, this protein is one of the top 10 causes of food poisoning and can lead to nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting when eaten in abundance.
Yes. That's why beans and grains should be eaten cooked.

Beans are recommended by every mainstream health organization, and by every mainstream vegetarian/vegan organization.

The American Diabetes Association recommends eating beans: http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fi...healthy-food-choices/diabetes-superfoods.html

The American Heart Association recommends eating beans: https://recipes.heart.org/Articles/1026/The-Benefits-of-Beans-and-Legumes

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (the world's largest association of Registered Dietitians) recommends eating beans: http://www.eatright.org/resource/health/wellness/preventing-illness/inflammation-and-diet

The Vegan Society recommends eating beans: https://www.vegansociety.com/resources/recipes/main-meals/mexican-bean-rice

The Vegetarian Resource Group recommends eating beans: http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/protein.php

Vegan Outreach recommends eating beans: http://veganhealth.org/articles/intro

Please forgive; I'm not saying that a properly-planned raw vegan diet is unhealthy. I am correcting the misconception, prevalent among some raw foodists, that beans and grains are unhealthy.
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Why raw foods? Well, when you cook food, you destroy a range of nutrients. So, we absolutely need some raw food.

Enzymes, in particular, do not survive cooking.


One recommendation I heard re a raw food diet, is to go 80% raw and 20% cooked.

My personal guess would be that is about the greatest ratio I would try.

I think it is fine to fast on juices for a bit of time.

I think it is fine to do a purely raw diet (if well researched) for some time...oh, say a couple of months.


But, long term, I don't think folks should go beyond 80% raw and 20% cooked.

I don't think 100% raw is good long term.
 

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I agree with Jon. Thanks for your idea :) at least we can all share what we know. that's how a thread should be. People reading would learn from us all. I think just don't overdo juicing. For some people it is beneficial but I guess for some it's not. Some prefer a juicer but for some, the blender is what they need. I usually read these kinds of interesting articles as For some people, they can afford a juicer but for others just opt to have a blender.
 
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