VeggieBoards banner

1 - 20 of 48 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi. As a newbie Vegan, I am curious why some people remain lacto-ovo vegetarians.<br><br><br><br>
I mean this in a completely curious (not judgemental) way, so please do not be offened with this question:<br><br><br><br>
IF you are vegetarian for moral reasons (mass production, suffing, hideous death for animals), why would someone eat milk and eggs? I know that cows are not directly killed from being milked, and that chickens don't die when they lay an egg, but in some ways, these animal suffer more than the meat animals do. (They live longer years in suffering than do animals raised just for meat).<br><br><br><br>
So, for curiosities sake, can you fill me in?<br><br><br><br>
Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,684 Posts
*sigh* I'm still lacto-ovo because thus far my attempts at veganism haven't "stuck" yet. I want to go vegan, but sometimes I don't want to badly enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,648 Posts
EquiPro,<br><br><br><br>
I don't think anyone is <i>only</i> vegetarian. This lifestyle is a journey, not a destination, and different people are at different places on their paths at different times.<br><br><br><br>
I appreciate any effort that any person makes to reduce animal suffering. Even if a person only feels capable of going without meat one day out of the week, or one meal out of the week...or even one meal out of the month, I have to appreciate their effort, because at least they are doing something.<br><br><br><br>
A lacto-ovo vegetarian is saving many lives, and I appreciate each and every person who chooses to live that life. I have chosen to become vegan, and that's where I am on my journey right now.<br><br><br><br>
Peace to you. ^_^
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I absolutely agree with you. I have no judgement whatsoever. In fact, I think that it is very important the each being makes decisions that work in the moment of "now". As I stated, I am just curious. I don't know if it because they love eggs and cheese, or if they don't have access to Vegan foods, or whatever.<br><br><br><br>
That's why I posted this. I don't need or want to convert anyone. Everyone who is at this site is here because they are called to this life. Mostly as a former MAJOR meat eater, I am curious about the process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,648 Posts
Well, I've known for the past few months that I wanted to eliminate dairy and eggs from my diet, and all other animal products from my lifestyle.<br><br><br><br>
I'm probably about 95% vegan right now...I have no trouble avoiding milk or eggs, and I've even learned to love tofu sour cream and hummus on my bagels instead of cream cheese...but just regular old gooey melted cheese still holds a fascination for me that I haven't been able to completely defeat.<br><br><br><br>
I don't <i>cheat</i> often, but it happens every once in awhile...a bite here, a nibble there...but the little bites and nibbles are becoming fewer, and I hope to eventually eliminate them altogether.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
701 Posts
I, too, consider myself to be on a journey but I'm definitely in the BEGINNING of it, and so I'm lacto-ovo right now. I travel frequently and eat out quite a bit, in addition to the fact that I am only a mediocre cook, so those are some of the reasons that I haven't converted to veganism sooner. But of course those are just excuses and laziness -- I am fully aware of how its possible to be vegan in spite of all of those things. Unlike with other lacto-ovos, it's not so much the taste (although I do like cheese a lot!) it's more the convenience of it and how it suits my lifestyle right now. (Selfish, I know)<br><br><br><br>
I'm taking baby steps in the right direction. I've only been fully vegetarian for about 14 months. And it's part of a larger process to try to live more consciously and compassionately.<br><br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
431 Posts
Well for me it's because I still live at home and my mum gets upset if cook seperatley - yeah i know its a cop out. Apart from that I'm still having trouble working out what is veggie and what isn't (all those nasty little numbers on the packets) so I guess I wanted to get used to being veggie before I went all the way (3 1/2 months now).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,612 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by EquiPro</i><br><br><b>I mean this in a completely curious (not judgemental) way, so please do not be offened with this question:</b></div>
</div>
<br>
I'm SO offended.<br><br><br><br>
Sike. It's a great question, actually. I'm too poor to buy the vegan foods I used to buy so for the time-being, I'm "just vegetarian." If I ever make real money again, I'll go back to being vegan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
859 Posts
I might go fully vegan some day but for now my reasons for not being vegan are as follows:<br><br><br><br>
1. I'd never be able to eat out here.<br><br>
2. I rely too much on convenience foods which are almost always lacto-ovo<br><br>
3. I can't afford to buy vegan replacement foods for things like ice cream, etc.<br><br>
4. There are very few vegan fake meats availble here. Most have whey or egg whites.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,541 Posts
I agree with ceryna. It's not "only a vegetarian". Veganism is NOT the pinnacle that everyone aspires to, and it certainly isn't mine.<br><br><br><br>
I am technically a lacto-ovo, in the process of cutting out dairy. I still cheat every now and then (as in today, craving chocolate, no soy chocolate in sight, so I gave in), and I'll eat something with dairy in it if I have no other choice. I feel that the amount I've already cut back with dairy (considering how much cheese I used to eat!) is enormous.<br><br><br><br>
Eggs. I buy certified free range organic eggs. While that doesn't mean much in some countries I have faith in the eggs that are certified by third parties here like the organic farmers association etc as their credibility is on the line. I don't see any need to cut out eggs if they are not obtained through cruel practices.<br><br><br><br>
Vegetarianism IS a lifestyle thing for me, not just a diet, so it follows through in everything I do, clothes I buy, etc. You don't have to be a vegan to try and live as cruelty free as possible. JMHO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
please....please....I retract the word, "only". We are all veg*n! I surrender.....but...please....keep the posts coming.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
BTW, I was shocked....SHOCKED... to find out that "'free range", here in the US anyway, does NOT mean cruelty free. I had no idea until I read this article... I really was....<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.cok.net/lit/freerange.php" target="_blank">http://www.cok.net/lit/freerange.php</a><br><br><br><br>
I still purchase eggs because egg whites (hard boiled, with salt only, please) are one of my 5 year olds only true protein foods. I am SO thrilled that I found a woman close to me who owns 17 egg laying hens that are so free that they sleep in the trees at night (that thought blows me away - I've never seen a chicken sleep in a tree), and all have names. I get about 4 dozen every couple of weeks and pass them on to my family and friends. I would probably be an omni again if things were different.<br><br><br><br>
I, btw, don't eat the eggs simply because I am trying to get out of the habit. I love eggs and right behind that comes eggs and cheese, steak and eggs, etc. A BAD path for me to tread.<br><br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,541 Posts
That's why I buy the eggs certified by a third party... here they can get away with labelling it free range when they're not really but for it to be certified it actually has to pass inspections by an organisation not affiliated with the farm.<br><br><br><br>
Ideally I will eventually have my own chickens so I KNOW how they are treated, but until someone comes along and exposes the certification process in Australia (which hasn't been done yet) I am happy with these eggs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,369 Posts
Ceryna, your avatar is the cutest picture i have ever seen in my life!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
452 Posts
For me, I think about how I envision the future if more people followed certain beliefs. I've met some vegans who demand no less than a total separation between human and animal interaction. To me, that seems unrealistic and even a bit elitist. I believe that we have a symbiotic relationship with animals, and to arbitrarily exclude anything having to do with them seems more harmful to both parties in the long run. Killing animals when alternative means of sustenance exist, however, benefits neither party.<br><br><br><br>
I'm also not too keen on the dogma. I've seen a lot of thought processes that seem to boil down to the following arbitrary process:<br><br><br><br>
1. I am vegan.<br><br>
2. <i>x</i> is not vegan.<br><br>
3. Therefore, I will not partake of <i>x</i>.<br><br><br><br>
Little thought goes into any ethical ramifications, which seems to indicate a lack of introspection. I have no need to claim any 'cool points' I might get from this particular label, so it seems like a hollow behavior. The only reason I label myself 'vegetarian' is to make it simpler for other people to know my eating preferences, so they don't mistakenly get me a Big Mac or the like.<br><br><br><br>
When it comes to the suffering of animals, I like to consider the source. The meat industry says one thing, the AR groups say another. Personally, I believe both groups put more of a premium on lobbying their side rather than presenting an objective and honest depiction of what really goes on. And when I see organizations like PETA advocating the capture and euthanasia of all stray cats, I really start to question their motivations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,481 Posts
Because I enjoy eating cheese, yogurt and drinking coffee beverages. I am trying to make an effort to eliminate dairy and eggs from my diet, but right now I rely very heavily on convenience foods and I would starve if I tried to eliminate these from my diet. I am making an effort and experiment with vegan substitutes and I am trying to gradually reduce the amount of animal products that I use. However there are too many things in my diet that aren't vegan that if I tried to eliminate them all at once - that wouldn't be good. Becoming vegetarian was a long process for me - almost a 6 year process - so that was a huge victory for me in of itself. It is an ongoing process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,090 Posts
Did someone actually use the word "Sike".<br><br><br><br>
Anyways, I'm no longer vegan because I think veganisms insistence on perfection causes many to fail and give up rather than to simply do their best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,211 Posts
I'm ovo-lacto. I lean towards veganism, bu tI don't actually adopt veganism fully for a few reasons, mainly social. My parents would freak out. They're not very veg-friendly, though they do respect my decision. They're worried about my long term health, particularly since they've realised that this isn't a phase, and if I announced that I ws going vegan, then as much as they said I'd turn pale, they'd be even paler with fear for my health, as much as I have said that I know where to get adequate nutrition from.<br><br><br><br>
And it'd be very difficult to do it socially. The fact that i take vegetarianism very strictly creates a few barriers, and sometimes i feel that people think I'm weird for refusing to eat stuff with carmine in it.<br><br><br><br>
But despite this, it's something I'd like to do in the future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
I have been lacto-ovo for almost 9 years and I have never considered going vegan. Sometimes it is hard enough for me to take the time out of my day even to remember to eat... there is no way I can devote the necessary brainpower to creating balanced vegan meals. Being a veggie gives me plenty of flexibility. Being vegan, I would feel trapped by my food options.<br><br><br><br>
I know there is more I could be doing to make this world a better place! But, as kpickell said, I do my best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
828 Posts
As Loki said, there are social reasons some still eat dairy and eggs. It's hard enough to convince friends/family to order a veggie pizza, they would never go for a cheeseless pizza. ditto if someone makes a cake with eggs and milk and it's not worth it for me to decline (I'd NEVER hear the end of it).<br><br>
Also, where I live there are no vegetarian, let alone vegan restaurants. I don't buy eggs anymore and I don't drink milk anymore. Mostly I just eat cheese and yogurt sometimes.<br><br><br><br>
I will probably gradually go vegan when I move into the city where I will have more grocery shopping options and where I will hopefully meet more people who aren't the small-town-raised on 'meat and potatoes' crowd.
 
1 - 20 of 48 Posts
Top