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Oryzatarian
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone link me to a nutritional analysis of whole bananas <i>including the peel</i>?<br>
I've searched all over and I'm getting the feeling I'm nearly the only person in the english speaking world who eats bananas whole. That or I just dont have my google mojo working.<br>
Obviously theres more fiber (lol) but I'm very curious about the actual vitamins. I suspect the peel-wasters are throwing away the largest share of vitamins.
 

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I'd say nutritiondata.com, but I'd bet they don't include the peel? Are you buying organic only? Bananas are treated with heavy pesticide use.
 

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Oryzatarian
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That site was the first I tried, no peel data.<br><br>
I buy organic only when I go to the fancier (and overall much more expensive) stores I rarely bother with. Peeled bananas are said to have far less pesticides than peeled apples, some of that I expect to be due to thicker peel but a with-peel pesticide comparison would be another thing that would interest me.<br>
I always wash them.
 

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I haven't found anything outlining the entire nutritional content of an entire banana, peel and all, but I found this that shows the chemical makeup of the peel:<br><a href="http://www.medwelljournals.com/abstract/?doi=jftech.2008.263.266" target="_blank">http://www.medwelljournals.com/abstr...h.2008.263.266</a><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Musa sapientum (banana) peels were analysed for minerals, nutritional and antinutritional contents.<br>
The result of mineral content indicate the concentrations (mg/g) of potassium, calcium, sodium, iron, manganese, bromine, rubidium, strontium, zirconium and niobium to be 78.10, 19.20, 24.30, 0.61, 76.20, 0.04, 0.21, 0.03, 0.02 and 0.02 respectively.<br>
The percentage concentrations of protein, crude lipid, carbohydrate and crude fibre were 0.90, 1.70, 59.00 and 31.70 respectively.<br>
The results indicate that if the peels are properly exploited and process, they could be a high-quality and cheap source of carbohydrates and minerals for livestock.</div>
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And then there's this, which talks about a study that showed banana peels can help depression and your retinas:<br><a href="http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2007/09/18/2003379274" target="_blank">http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiw.../18/2003379274</a><br><a href="http://www.lef.org/news/LefDailyNews.htm?NewsID=6405&Section=NUTRITION" target="_blank">http://www.lef.org/news/LefDailyNews...tion=NUTRITION</a><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">A team of researchers from Taiwan has found that banana peel extract can ease depression and also protect eyesight.<br><br>
After a two-year study, scientists at Taichung's Chung Shan Medical University found that banana peel is rich in the neurotransmitter serotonin, believed to regulate moods.<br><br>
A low level of serotonin has been linked to depression, and a whole class of anti-depressant drugs have been developed to increase concentrations of the neurotransmitter in the brain.<br><br>
The Taiwanese researchers recommend boiling banana peel and drinking the water, or drinking banana peel juice extracted by a domestic fruit-juicing machine. Doing so once each day or several times a week can help beat the blues, they say.<br><br>
If you do this, you'll get a double whammy.<br><br>
The scientists say banana peel contains lutein, an antioxidant from the carotenoid family, which provides nutritional support to the eyes. They did clinical trials on two groups of retina cells - one soaked in a solution of banana peel and the other a control group.</div>
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Though I hope you get organic bananas, because the peels harbor all sorts of pesticides and whatnot.
 

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Oryzatarian
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ah, that peel analysis helps, thanks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br>
Had no idea there was so much saponin.<br>
Interesting how the news articles emphasize lutein. The fruit flesh has a roughly equal mix of alpha-carotene, ß-carotene, and lutein (and likely some other carotenoids) in not very impressive amounts. The peels coloration has me wondering if it has substantially higher amounts of all of those. My diet has no shortage of lutein (thank you kale) but the prospect of the peel having a significant amount of alpha-carotene, and just a diversity of carotenoids as a whole, is an interesting one.
 

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It's probably also worth noting that regardless of what the peel is comprised of, you'll probably only be able to absorb a small fraction of it. It may even provide so much additional fiber that it interferes with your digestion of the rest of the banana as well. Not everything was meant to be eaten.
 

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Banana peels are edible?
 

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Not likely.
 

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Not to harp on the whole organic issue, and it's probably no worse than smoking cigarettes or something and you can do what you want, but conventional bananas do use enormous amounts of pesticides and they are often applied directly to the outside of the fruit (they cover the banana bunches with plastic bags and inject pesticides into the bags). The only reason peeled bananas have less pesticides is their peel protects the interior of the fruit and doesn't allow the pesticides to get through. It's all in the peel though, and washing has never been an awesome way to remove any pesticides/herbicides. If you are eating the peel for health reasons it seems counter-productive to eat a whole bunch of poisons too...
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>LilBigBug</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3053847"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Banana peels are edible?</div>
</div>
<br>
If you are an iguana.
 

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I'm still kind of wondering the "why" you'd want to eat the peel, when there are so many vegetable, fruit options available....it honestly can't taste good,and it would be a lot of work to even try to chew it! If bananas are ver yripe, then the peels kind of get that mushy slimy feel...if not ripe, then they're hard and very fibrous.
 

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Oryzatarian
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>LilBigBug</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3053847"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Banana peels are edible?</div>
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Yes. They have been used in mexican, asian, and middle eastern cooking. For example heres a page where a Sri Lankan man went to Tanzania to teach them how to cook banana peel so they would have that much more food <a href="http://www.vsa.org.nz/blog/volunteer-blogs/anne-perera-tanzania/cooking-banana-blossom-peel-and-stem/" target="_blank">[1]</a><br><br>
I personally dont cook them, but rather eat the whole banana fresh, half with morning snack and the other half with dinner. I just slice into it with my pocket knife, grab the slice with my teeth, and flick the knife through, so its not really 'ropey' since the fibers are reduced to like 5 mm in length. They can be a bit astringent and resiny when not fully ripe and uncooked but when ripe its quite good, IMO. I've easily eaten 200 bananas that way and never got sick but I would not advise eating too much in a single day as it could produce a laxative or antinutritive effect.<br><br>
Kiwi peel is edible too.<br><br>
Most food crops produce more than one food item. After starting to grow my own vegetables, and trying to use all edible biomass from that, its quite impressive how many products from familiar crops are edible but virtually unknown as such in the USA. Like every part of pumpkin, zucchinis, and most squashes are edible and I think this year I actually got more food value from the leaves and young stems on my squash vines than from the fruit! Winter squash rind is 'technically' edible, just tough, I'm gonna try powdering that for use in burritos. Some beans (like black-eyed peas (cowpeas)) produce a higher yield of protein and vitamins in their leaves than in their beans and harvesting the leaves a little at a time over the growing season has been shown to actually increase yield of beans in some species, just be sure to cook anything bean. Some greens, like carrot greens, are a spice. Grape leaves are a vegetable and can be used in tea mixes. I'm not sure whats done with broccoli leaves, cabbage outer leaves, rutabaga leaves, etc. commercially- I expect theyre fed to hogs and chickens, I just know where they'll go once they leave my garden... the kitchen!<br>
Its amazing whats edible, more than once I've thought twice about growing a vegetable when I find out that for it <i>only</i> the traditionally ate part is edible. Like cucumbers and melons, whos leaves cause vomiting <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:">
 

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^---wow that really has me thinking about the edibles we waste!
 
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