VeggieBoards banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<b><a href="http://reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=scienceNews&storyID=2714549" target="_blank">WHO Urges Food Chiefs to Join Fight for Better Diet</a></b><br><br>
Fri May 9, 2003 02:18 PM ET<br><br><br><br><br><br>
GENEVA (Reuters) - The world's top health body told bosses of food and drink multinationals, including Coca-Cola and McDonald's, on Friday they could play a key role in shifting public taste in its campaign for healthier diets worldwide.<br><br>
The World Health Organization has warned that some 60 percent of the 56.6 million deaths each year around the globe are due to non-communicable illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancers and respiratory diseases brought on by smoking, lack of exercise and bad eating habits.<br><br><br><br>
"We believe that companies like yours can make a major contribution toward easing this (disease) burden and promoting healthier diets and lifestyles," WHO director-general Gro Harlem Brundtland told the executives from companies such as Nestle, Coca-Cola and McDonald's .<br><br><br><br>
WHO member states are due to sign the first international treaty to combat smoking later this month and the U.N. agency is committed to presenting a "global strategy" on diet and physical activity to its 2004 annual meeting.<br><br><br><br>
In preparation for that global plan, WHO is holding talks with the food industry, interested groups and member states.<br><br><br><br>
A recent report by WHO and sister U.N. agency, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) recommended cutting down on fats, sugars and salt, and increasing consumption of vegetables and fruit, saying such changes would have a major impact on the death toll from the so-called "lifestyle" diseases.<br><br><br><br>
Some findings were contested by food companies, notably the U.S. sugar industry, which objected to the report setting a ceiling of 10 percent for sugar in an overall diet.<br><br><br><br>
"We would like to see real moves to cut the amount of fat, sugars and salt in foods. We think that consumers have a basic right to know what they are eating and the effects it can have on them," former Norwegian prime minister Brundtland said.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top