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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just out of curiosity so I don't find out by getting ill, what do I actually get out of meat, and what do I need to replace it with as a vegetarian?

I've heard of B-12, but I thought that was more of a vegan issue since apparently it can come from other animal products.
 

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Protein, iron, zinc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm pretty sure I still get protein from other stuff I eat... not sure what has iron... never even knew I needed zinc. I always thought that stuff was toxic.
 

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Putrescine, cadaverine, and amino acid complexes resulting from incompletely digested animal flesh that lead to cellular inflammation and auto-immune reactions.
 

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http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/nutshell.htm

Quote:
Vegetarian Nutrition

Protein

Vegetarians easily meet their protein needs by eating a varied diet, as long as they consume enough calories to maintain their weight.
It is not necessary to plan combinations of foods. A mixture of proteins throughout the day will provide enough "essential amino acids." (See "Position of the American Dietetic Association: Vegetarian Diets," JADA, July 2009; Simply Vegan, 2006; and nutrition information on VRG's website, www.vrg.org.)
SOURCES OF PROTEIN: beans, lentils, tofu, nuts, seeds, tempeh, chickpeas, peas... Many common foods, such as whole grain bread, greens, potatoes, and corn, quickly add to protein intake.

Iron


SOURCES OF IRON: dried fruits, baked potatoes, mushrooms, cashews, dried beans, spinach, chard, tofu, tempeh, bulgur, and iron-fortified foods (such as cereals, instant oatmeal, and veggie "meats") are all good sources of iron. To increase the amount of iron absorbed at a meal, eat a food containing vitamin C, such as citrus fruit or juices, tomatoes, or broccoli. Using iron cookware also adds to iron intake.

Calcium


SOURCES OF CALCIUM: Good sources include broccoli, collard greens, kale, mustard greens, tofu prepared with calcium, low-fat dairy products, fortified soymilk, and fortified orange juice.

Vitamin B12


The adult recommended intake for vitamin B12 is very low. Vitamin B12 comes primarily from animal-derived foods. A diet containing dairy products or eggs provides adequate vitamin B12. Fortified foods, such as some brands of cereal, nutritional yeast, soymilk, or soy analogs, are good non-animal sources. Check labels to discover other products that are fortified with vitamin B12. Tempeh and sea vegetables are not a reliable source of vitamin B12. To be on the safe side, if you do not consume dairy products, eggs, or fortified foods regularly, you should take a non-animal derived supplement.

Omega-3

To maximize production of DHA and EPA (omega-3 fatty acids found in fish and made by our bodies), include good sources of alpha-linolenic acid in your diet. Alpha-linolenic acid is found in flaxseed, flaxseed oil, canola oil, tofu, soybeans, and walnuts. You can also obtain DHA directly from foods fortified with DHA from microalgae (in some brands of soymilk) and supplements containing microalgae-derived DHA.
Here's a nice general overview of vegetarian nutrition to get you started, it's pretty easy to get everything you need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hm... from the looks of that it's mostly calcium and omega-3 that I'm missing then. Also, calcium is a prick... I hate those foods.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
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Originally Posted by SomebodyElse View Post

Putrescine, cadaverine, and amino acid complexes resulting from incompletely digested animal flesh that lead to cellular inflammation and auto-immune reactions.
Well admittedly I can't see whether or not my cells are inflamed, but I think I must be immune to the auto-immune reactions.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Savvington View Post

I'm pretty sure I still get protein from other stuff I eat... not sure what has iron... never even knew I needed zinc. I always thought that stuff was toxic.
All nutrients are toxic in excessive quantities.
 

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There is a lot of Calcium in Almond Milk and the other non dairy milks as well. I would not worry about that.
 

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Protein, iron, B-12, vitamin A, omega fatty acids... all I can think of off the top of my head. Aside from B-12, all can be found in plant sources. Protein can be found in legumes(beans,nuts,seeds), whole grains, and many vegetables(a medium stalk of broccoli has about 8 grams, surprise surprise). Iron can be found in legumes and leafy greens. Vitamin A, once again leafy greens, and carrots and particular have a lot of that. Omega fatty acids are abundant in nuts, seeds, avocados, and plant oils. Calcium is found in pretty much every vegetable and legume. Many non-dairy milks on the market have more calcium than cow's milk. Lastly B-12 although not naturally occurring in plants, many non-dairy milk brands are fortified with B-12. You can take a supplement as well.
 

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My policy (I have been lacto-vegetarian for around 50 to 60 years) is to take an interest in my health, and whether I might be lacking some vitamin (or more likely mineral), but turn to FOODS rather than supplements to rectify it. Who wants to live on tablets? There are many hoary old myths, such as 'cheese is full of calcium, so eat lots of cheese'. Actually, cheese has high protein and phosphorus also, and so leaches out calcium. The acquisition of which is hormonal rather than from dietary intake, & the best source is sunlight. Forget iron; anaemia is equal among carnivores & vegetarians, means lack of blood,and has nothing to do with iron deficiency (hypoferraemia, which is uncommon). I never eat foods supplemented with iron, and would never take iron tablets unless my serum levels were very low. Most men over 40 have too much in their blood, which causes myocardial infarct.
Many top athletes are vegetarian, but body-building is not usually one of them - since building useless muscles for exhibition requires high protein/amino-acid intake (which has nothing much to do with health, in fact is not very healthy).
Likewise, many older people have B12 deficiency due to gastric dystrophy; if your intestines can't absorb it, only injections can help. The chief difficulty is ridding the subconscious of age-old myths such as "No-one can live without meat", or that you are a crazy pioneer. Still perpetuated by Dairy and Meat Boards for commercial reasons. Relax and enjoy great health!
After 20 odd years working in a hospital, I came to the conclusion that meat is a disease-food.
 
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