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I'm allergic to all nuts and seeds, I've recently transitioned to Vegan and I train in the gym 5/7 days. Where can I get a decent amount of protein for my diet and lifestyle? :)
 

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Oryzatarian
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Oats and beans.
Oats are richer and more balanced in protein than most people think and they supply carbs, which is turned into glycogen- a muscles fuel reserve. Before the supplement industry confused everyone the old school body builders loved oats.
 

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Pasta (Black bean pasta, especially, if you can find it is very high in protein, but even regular pasta has a decent amount), tofu, seitan, pretty much all kinds of beans, lentils, quinoa...

I recommend watching Jon Venus and Brian Turner on YouTube. They're vegan bodybuilders, and post some of what they eat.
 

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Vegan since 1991
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I'm allergic to all nuts and seeds, I've recently transitioned to Vegan and I train in the gym 5/7 days. Where can I get a decent amount of protein for my diet and lifestyle? :)
Cooked legumes (beans, lentils, and split peas) are very good sources of protein. One cup of boiled legumes typically contains 15 - 18 grams of protein: http://www.calorieking.com/foods/ca...umes-beans-black-boiled_f-ZmlkPTEzMDYwNg.html

Because you are physically active, a more important goal for you is to get enough calories to fuel your exercise. Vegan staple foods (legumes, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables) are low in calories, compared to high-fat meats and dairy. On a low-fat vegan diet, it's possible to eat until you're full, yet still not get enough calories.

In order to boost their calorie intake, many of us vegans add small amounts of high-calorie foods to our diets. Nuts, seeds, coconut, avocados, and oil are examples of these foods. Because you are unable to eat nuts and seeds, avocados and oil might be good choices for you.

When first starting a vegan diet, it can be helpful to do a bit of planning.

Mercy For Animals has a beautifully-illustrated Vegetarian Starter Guide (it's actually vegan): http://www.mercyforanimals.org/files/VSG.pdf . On page 13, it does a nice job of summarizing vegan nutrition. It also includes lots of easy meal ideas.

This webpage summarizes nutrients that vegans should focus on: http://veganhealth.org/articles/dailyrecs

To make sure you're getting enough calories, you can:

1. Use an online calorie calculator (like this one http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-l...ting/in-depth/calorie-calculator/itt-20084939 ) to estimate your daily calorie needs. If you are extremely physically active, you might needs even more calories than this calculator predicts. High intensity exercise can burn 1,000 calories per hour.

2. Use this food calorie rule of thumb:

One cup of boiled legumes contains about 230 calories

One cup of boiled grains / pasta contains about 190 calories

One cup of fresh (not dried) fruit contains 40-100 calories

One cup of non-starchy vegetables contains 5-40 calories

One tablespoon of oil contains 120 calories

One medium avocado contains about 320 calories

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You can get enough protein from fruit, vegetable and some beans. In fact people don´t need as much protein as they think. It was written in a book "The China Study" by Dr. T. Colin Campbell that we need only 10% of protein.
 

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I see that the China study has been quoted above. Would like to ad that Dr John Mcdougall advocates a similar percentage of protein in diet. As you workout quite a bit in the gym have a look at Robert Cheeke 's advice, author of Shred It. He recommends a 70% starch and 15% each of protein and fats.

Sent from my SM-T535 using Tapatalk
 

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Bandit
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You can get more calories and protein from amaranth or quinoa than rice. Combine either one with beans, lentils or tofu and you are all set.
 
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