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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, I don't mean to start a war here, but where do vegans draw the line as to "this is OK... that is not"?

For example... if the people who handle the food packages in the shipping department wear leather gloves and boots, will you buy/consume the product? What if the organic cotton shirt you've got your eye on in the store is sandwiched on the rack between a silk shirt and a wool jacket?

I'm not trying to be sarcastic... I'm honestly trying to find out where people draw the line. I'm guessing the answer is "it depends on the person" and perhaps additionally, "it depends on whether everything has been disclosed to the consumer"...
 

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If it's not involved in the production of the food itself, I don't care what someone wears in the handling of it. Honestly, I don't even care if my vegan burger is grilled on the same spot as a meat burger, but I'm weird that way, I guess.

My goal is simply to remove myself entirely from the animal exploitation economy. That's how I draw the line.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
as far as non-food items go: i dont buy any products with animal derived ingredients, and i also don't buy or use silk, wool, leather or other skins or furs. i dont buy jeans with leather tags on the backs. i don't buy anything from companies that i know engage in animal testing, and i dont buy any proctor and gamble anything. its a process though. and my ulitmate goal is pretty much the same as epski said.

as far as what i eat, i prefer my food to have been kept seperate from non vegan food during cooking and stuff, but i dont really make a big deal if it wasnt, i try to pick my battles carefully, because when i meet new people and stuff, i want to represent a really clean and pure way of life that i try to live, instead of appear fanatical and obssesive, so they think about it instead of just immediately dismiss the idea, you know?

it really is a life long process i think, you change and grow everyday, and everyday my priorities become a little more clear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I draw the line wherever the vegan police tell me too.....


Seriously, to paraphrase Jiminey Cricket, I just let my conscience be my guide. As long as I am conscious and aware of the decisions I am making regarding the food I eat, the products I buy, and the consequences of that I feel that I am doing a pretty good job, compared to the rest of the people in my culture where conspicuous consumerism is the catchphrase of the day.

I realize that there is no such thing as a Perfect Vegan. It's impossible. I accept that my actions have an effect on the world--I just try to make sure that its as minimal and positive as possible. I also accept that the only person's behavior I can control is my own. So it really doesn't bother me too much if someone else is wearing leather or preparing meat at the same place I get my meal, etc....I can only look to my own behaviour.

I get enough flack from omni's picking apart my life ['Do you know how many insects had to die for that veggie burger.....], without worrying about how other veg*ns feel about my lifestyle.

My conscience is clear.
 

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I just do what I can. So many things are not made known to us, so it's impossible to know everything. You know, no matter how strict we are, it would be impossible to exist without harming something. Apparently, just breathing kills tiny live organisms! I read that the cement used to make the streets we walk contains animal products too. There is only so much control we can possess. However, if I am aware of something the I can control, I will definitely use my veganism as a guide and make a decision accordingly.
 

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I'd also add that when there are clear alternatives, then that makes it easy to draw the line. In this case, there are plenty of tofu products that don't use silk in the manufacturing process. Other cases, there may not be an option, and so it may not be acceptable for some people to give up that product.

I just think we should try and be as consistent as possible. It's when we're inconsistent that we leave ourselves open to charges of hipocrisy, true or not.
 

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Well, I'm not a vegan, but I'm definitely headed in that direction.

My biggest reason for eliminating animal products from my diet is that I know what cows, sheep, pigs, chickens, fish, etc. have to endure and I think its an atrocity, so I choose not to support it.

However, I don't feel the same way about insects. I will still eat silken tofu, and some things that have honey in them (I do avoid carmine though). This doesn't mean that I sit at home in a silk kimono eating honeycomb and watching my ant traps, but I'm not going to have fit if something I eat occasionally has honey in it or was filtered through silk. If this means I can never be "vegan" that's fine with me. I certainly don't wear silk or eat insects.

There are animal products in lots of things, from the tires on my car (which I bought before becoming vegetarian and unfortunately has leather seats) to the glue that binds my copy of Becoming Vegan, and as someone mentioned lots of insects are killed in fruit and vegetable production. In fact, I think I read somewhere that honey operations and orchards are sometimes situated next to eachother so that the bees will have a source of nectar and the flowers will be pollenated. Does this mean that some apples and oranges aren't vegan?

I basically do what I feel is right, and to me the most important thing I can do is oppose meat, eggs, dairy, leather, wool, etc. I won't drink Guinness because it has isinglass in it, but I still drink Sleeman Honey Brown because it doesn't bother me.
 

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I am not vegan either. I eat eggs and cheese although I am serrisouly considering greatly reducing these products as well.

I guess I would draw the line at killing animals then.
 

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I'm as Vegan as possible without going completely insane.

I've broken the Vpolice rules, but I've stayed vegan since 1978
 

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i draw the line at what I am comfortable with. You need to accept that the world is predominately non-vegan, and thus many products you buy will be from companies who aren't interested in environmental concerns, or from companies who do produce non-veg*n food.

Then there are other problems. I've heard of some vegans who don't eat mushrooms, because a lot of mushrooms are grown in bonemeal fertilisers, and a few other things. But even then, cow crap is used to fertilise fields of soybeans, so the cycle does go on. But I draw the line at the food itself. I have very little control over whether cow crap or peat is used to fertilise the fields where my food is grown. The only way to be 100% sure is to grow it yourself, and I don't have the resources to do this myself, and neither do many others

Vaganism isn't about being 100% vegan, because there's no such thing. It's about blending practicality and survival with a desire to end animal suffering.
 

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I'm no longer vegan, but I do greatly reduce the amount of dairy and animal by-products that I eat. But I do eat vegetarian products that may contain milk, cheese, and eggs (such as Morningstar meats, Campbells VV Soup, etc). If I'm ordering out I always ask to hold the cheese, but I don't worry about the ingredients in the bread, etc. I would say my diet is 95% dairy free; but since there are trace ingredients in the products I buy I no longer call myself vegan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I guess that's one of the points I was hoping somebody would bring up... about organic farming practices sometimes (often?) involving animal by-products such as manure and even bone meal. And of course, what originally brought me to the questions was the discussion on silken tofu being strained through silk to get the desired texture. (I'm still waiting to hear what the company's reply was...)

Thanks for giving me something to think about
 

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Yeah, me too, but I only sent it out this weekend, so maybe we'll hear something (if anything) this week.
 

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i'm with loki...as long as what i consume/wear/use etc. does not contain animal ingredients and was not tested on animals, i am usually okay with it. in my opinion, it is a waste of my energy to worry any further than this, as time spent fretting over manure or whatever could be used for more useful endevors.
 

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kpickell-I am the same kind of vegetarian you are! I live in a very small town and vegan choices are few and far between. I don't eat obvious dairy and eggs but I don't worry so much about those ingredients in small quantities in my food. This has all been an evolution for me and this is where I am right now.
 
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