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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone know what "kay" mean, in Afro-American vernacular? This Afro-American person referred to me as "kay" repeatedly and now she's not talking to me any more so I can't ask her herself.

I couldn't find any decent Standard English - Afro-American Vernacular dictionaries on line.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hehe. No, she also referred to me as "kay," or "cay" or whatever, to other persons in the group. And she referred to me by my first name also. So it wasn't like she misheard my first name, and mistakenly referred to me as "Kay" instead of, umm, what my first name really is." Also, she is bi-lingual, able to tranfer from standard English to Afro-American vernacular and back, without hesitation, so I thought perhaps it might be a word from standard English. But I couldn't find a suitable word in the American Heritage Dictionary, either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I don't have any reason to think it was derogatory.

Nor to think it was slang. Much Afro-American vernacular is sufficiently well-rooted and accepted from generation to generation, so to qualify as vernacular or dialect rather than as "slang."
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
By the way, while I can only speak a handful of words and phrases in Afro-American dialect (actually, there are a multitude of regional dialects) I can usually understand everything being said by anyone in the United states with any regional or ethnic dialect. So maybe this was slang, which I often don't understand. But it didn't sound like slang.
 
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