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Quote:
Originally posted by PoesÃ*a

I knew someone who was a vegetarian for years that was in a macro-biotic cooking class and she told me that one day the teacher had them make lamb. Huh?!?!?! And she said she ate it and so did a lot of other people who had been vegitarians because they believed in what the teacher said. Isn't that bizarre? You'd never catch me eating meat because my macro teacher said to eat it! And it just doesn't seem like that could be correct that lamb is macro. Is there anyone who knows the answer to that?
Yes, lamb is definitely not macrobiotic. I am sorry that these students were following this teacher so blindly, and sorry that they never opened a book on macrobiotics, or they would have known better.

As it says on the Kushi Institute page that Michael referenced:

Quote:


Foods to Eliminate for Better Health

Meat, animal fat, eggs, poultry, dairy products (including butter, yogurt, ice cream, milk and cheese), refined sugars, chocolate, molasses, honey, other simple sugars and foods treated with them, and vanilla.
 

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Originally posted by Michael

http://www.macrobiotics.org/whatmacro.html

There's the definition, according to that organization, the site in general seems to be a decent source of information but I didn't really look it over.

Maybe we'll have someone here that's really into it.
Quite a number of our EarthSave Nashville members are macrobiotic, and they hold a "wholly Macro" potluck dinner every two weeks, which I attend regularly. In practice, these dinners are purely vegetarian.

Macrobiotics differs from vegetarianism in that a small quantity of fish is occasionally allowed, as is indicated on the Kushi Institute website. However, fish is not served at our "wholly Macro" dinners.

Macrobiotics also differs from vegetarianism in that certain vegetarian foods are also avoided, for example, the nightshades. So, no tomatoes, no tomato sauce, no potatoes, no eggplant, etc.

Also, many fruits are avoided, like oranges--especially if you live in a climate where such fruits do not grow naturally. Also, certain cooking techniques are shunned. For example, food is not to be cooked or heated by microwaves.

In practice, the "wholly Macro" dinners are virtually vegan, with maybe a few exceptions, where someone will have used an egg to make an occasional dish.

Finally, you need to realize that a large proportion of the people who seek out and practice macrobiotics do so for health reasons, i.e., they have serious health problems that Western medicine has "given up" on, or else the treatment offered by Western medicine is almost worse than the disease, so these people seek out macrobiotics to cope with those health problems.

For example, one of the leading macrobiotic counsellors in our group studied at the Kushi Institute and used macrobiotics to bring her Crohn's disease into remission. She has just written a book about it, telling her story.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...lance&n=507846
 

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Some info about the historical background of macrobiotics.

Here's what John Denver has written:

Translated from the Greek, "macro" means "large" or "great," and "bios" signifies "life." Herodotus, Aristotle, Galen and other classical writers used the term macrobiotics to describe a lifestyle, including a simple balanced diet, that promoted health and longevity.

In the late eighteenth century, the German physician and philosopher Christophe W. Hufeland renewed interest in the term. His influential book on diet and health was entitled _Macrobiotics, or The Art of Prolonging Life._

Nearly a century later, the term macrobiotics experienced a revival, this time originating in Japan. Two educators, Sagen I****suka, M.D., and Yukikazu Sakurazawa, cured themselves of serious illnesses by adopting a simple diet of brown rice, miso soup, sea vegetables, and other traditional foods. These educators spent many years studying and integrating traditional Oriental medicine and Eastern philosophy with Judeo-Christian teachings and wholistic perspectives in modern science and medicine. Sakurazawa ... adopted the name George Ohsawa, and applied the term macrobiotics to his teachings.

... Ohsawa devoted himself to defining macrobiotics as it applies to modern living ... visiting more than thirty countries, giving more

than seven thousand lectures, and publishing over three hundred books.

Ohsawa had many students, among them Michio Kushi ... [who came to the United States in 1949].

\t[Michio and his wife Aveline Kushi have published numerous books, founded the East West Foundation and the Kushi Institute, and the _East West Journal_. The Kushis also advocate strongly for world peace.]

\t--John Denver, "Preface" to Michio Kushi, _The Macrobiotic Way_ (1985), pp. xi-xii.
 

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I had dinner last weekend at our Wholly Macro potluck with a couple, Sheldon and Guinat (Janet) Rice, who are travelling the country and doing a study of macrobiotics and macrobiotic support groups in the US. They is a website summarizing their research here:

http://macrobiotics.sph.sc.edu/project.htm

Sheldon argued for a very loose definition of macrobiotics--almost saying that if a person calls what he is doing "macrobiotics," then that is macrobiotics.

It seems that there are "wide" vs. "narrow" practices of macrobiotics. It also seems that I have been exposed to the "narrow" or "strict" versions.

Here's how they put it in academic language:

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The study of macrobiotic practice is complicated by the fact that macrobiotics is not just a set of dietary

guidelines. Rather, food is seen as medicine and medicine as food within the oriental concept of balance.

Macrobiotic counselors are reluctant to give hard and fast rules because in their understanding no foods are

necessarily bad for a healthy person, except when eaten in excess. Thus macrobiotic practice is highly

individualized. The adoption of macrobiotics is also usually associated with a wide diversity of alternative healing

practices and other lifestyle changes. The qualitative approach is thus essential for the study of the holistic

context of health, healing and diet in peoples actual lives.
I am not saying that I necessarily agree with the Rice's, but I have been obliged to reconsider my views on the subject.
 
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