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Ok here is my problem: I posted some of these at vegweb. My Dog Eddy (adopted from humane society couple months ago) has been peeing in the house lately (never use to) he attacks my poor cat (we can't leave them alone together) chews on stuff (just ate another of my RAZORS!?!?! it didn't do anything this time Thank goodness) and he barks and howls when we leave. Any ideas to help with any of these problems would be greatly appreciated! Thanks much Starr
 

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That is so freaky that he actually ate razors! You poor thing, you must have been terrified!<br><br><br><br>
Besides that...it sounds like he has a severe case of "separation anxiety"......everything he does sounds like classic symptoms....except attacking the cat. That's another subject entirely.<br><br><br><br>
Just for my own general knowledge......How old is he?<br><br>
Is he neutered?<br><br>
How often does he go out on walks or for a potty break?<br><br>
Does he have a set schedule for walks and/or potty breaks? Does he urinate when you're gone, in your presence when you're not looking, or in front of you?<br><br>
Are there particular times during the day or night that he urinates in the house?<br><br>
Have you ever caught him in the act? and if so, what did you do?<br><br>
Have you "punished" him after the fact?<br><br>
Has he had a vet check up to rule out a possible bladder infection, worms, etc?<br><br>
Does he sleep in the same room with you at night?<br><br><br><br>
I know a lot of these questions seem like no brainers...but I wanted to ask EVERY possible link to the behavior.<br><br><br><br>
and yet, more questions <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"> ........<br><br>
How many, if any chew toys and what kind do you give him when you leave the house?<br><br>
Do you give him a special treat when you leave that he doesn't get otherwise?<br><br>
When you leave or come home, do you lavish him with affection?<br><br>
Do you encourage his vocalizations?<br><br><br><br>
Sorry to throw a whole bunch of questions at you, but these are integral things to know to figure out why he's doing the things he's doing. Only you can help him and I can see that you genuinely love him! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
Also...four reasons that dogs engage in destructive behavior are:<br><br>
1) Boredom<br><br>
2) Anxiety<br><br>
3) He's imitating the behavior (such as digging holes after seeing someone gardening)<br><br>
4) The behavior has been unknowingly reinforced<br><br><br><br>
The two most common causes however are Boredom and/or Anxiety.<br><br><br><br>
Here are a few triggers of anxiety in dogs:<br><br>
Sleeping seperate from the owners (I'm certainly not suggesting he sleep in bed with you though...in fact I discourage it....now a lot of people are going to yell at me. LOL)<br><br>
Overly harsh punishment<br><br>
Constantly being yelled at<br><br>
Being punished after the fact<br><br>
He was being shuttled from home to home during the first six months of his life<br><br>
He was confined in an animal shelter or pet shop for an extended period of time<br><br>
Is getting insufficient excercise<br><br>
Is getting insufficient overall attenion<br><br>
Has been inadvertently rewarded for acting out to get negative attention. Just like kids, dogs view negative attention as better than none at all.<br><br>
Has been given clothing and/or household items to chew on..thus confusing him<br><br>
Is excessively roughhoused<br><br>
Gets constant attention from owners when they are home (hence when they are not home the separation is that much more traumatizing)<br><br>
His demands for attention are responded to instantly<br><br>
Has experienced a traumatic event<br><br><br><br><br><br>
I KNOW that a lot of these you would probably NEVER do...but I wanted to list it anyway...who knows who might be reading it and might benefit as well...<br><br><br><br>
I'm sure this seems like a bit much, but just like people, dogs are complex too...but in their own way. If your'e interested, I'd love to help you and give some real advice...besides just questions. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
Maybe at some point you will be able to have the dog and the cat in a room together alone too! That would be great! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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morningstarr-<br><br><br><br>
I would highly suggest enrolling your dog in a behavior class, it would definitely help to identify why he acting out.<br><br><br><br>
Other than that, get into a routine and stick to it. Scold (more like use a stern voice) him when he does something he's not supposed. Use key words, like LEAVE IT, when he goes for something he's not supposed to, like the cat or the razors.<br><br><br><br>
Use a solution of vinegar and water to get rid of the pee smell, more often than not, if they still smell where they have peed, they will continue to pee there. Right after he pees inside before you even clean it up take him outside, saying the word outside while taking him there. If you catch him in act, try to stop him and directly take him out. Again saying outside.<br><br><br><br>
My dogs know those words and go directly to the door when I say outside. So if you get him used to certain words, it will help him break the habit. Hope this helps. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)">
 

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I'd recommend crate training. If you get a kong or similar hollow toy, you can fill it with canned dog food and freeze it over night. Put the kong in the crate in the morning and it should occupy your dog for most of the day.<br><br><br><br>
I also agree with greyhound girl about the obedience class thing. It will help your dog to feel more secure b/c he knows what he's supposed to be doing (dogs need jobs) and it will also establish you as the alpha figure.<br><br><br><br>
Good luck!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by Herself</i><br><br><b>except attacking the cat. That's another subject entirely.</b></div>
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Yeah, that subject is called "Dogs: What is their function and purpose in life?" <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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I also agree with mc, crates are a godsend.<br><br><br><br>
They get your dog into a routine and allows them to have a place they can call their own. I crate my 'kids' when I'm gone. They are large crate so they can stand up turn around and stretch, mind you, they are huge crates, well because I have big dogs.<br><br><br><br>
But the crate helps with the peeing inside too. Dogs are very leary of messing somewhere they have to sleep or even be. So they are less likely to mess in a crate. I take them out as soon as I let them out and give them a treat fo going in. All I have to say is 'crate' and they run right for them. I reward them for being obedient, and reward them when they come in when I call them. Getting into a routine is very important for dogs, as well as people. If you can establish a regular routine, it will make them feel at ease. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

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Yes, I agree with crate training (don't overdo it too long though).<br><br><br><br>
Make sure he's got some doggy toys!<br><br><br><br>
Get him some exercise to curb his energy.<br><br><br><br>
I'm a proponent for positive training, go to some classes. Never yell at or hit the dog. Reward him for being good, check out clicker training too.<br><br><br><br>
Realize that you may be unintentionally reinforcing some of his negative behaviors. Yelling and making a fuss when he's doing something bad is attention, and he may be glad to get attention from you, even if you are upset.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by muppetcow</i><br><br><b>If you get a kong or similar hollow toy, you can fill it with canned dog food and freeze it over night. Put the kong in the crate in the morning and it should occupy your dog for most of the day.</b></div>
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That's a good idea. I'll have to try that with my dogs.
 

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I'm having a problem with one of my dogs too... He chews up my carpet when I leave him uncrated, so I crated him and he escaped from the crate, so next time I crated him I put clips on the crate and now he's learned how to push out the bottom of the crate and chews up the carpet underneath the crate. I don't know what to do with this dog.
 

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I definitely recommend behavior classes! Find a good one through recommendations of friends or call around. They are not all created equal, some use methods I don't like, such as crating a dog when it's 'bad'. That's negative reinforcement, which helps nobody. I never, nor should you ever put your dog in the crate if they do something 'bad'. They will associate the crate with being bad, and won't want to go in it. The crate should be a desired place to go. My dogs hang out and sleep in them, even when I'm there. Most of the time, they are right next to me, but they do go in them. You never want to instill fear in your animals, that is when fear-based agresssion forms. That is when bites and lashing out happens. I've seen a lot of greyhounds with fear based aggression, it's very difficult to work through, although it is possible. Read books, try new things and techniques, go to some behavioral classes, talk to some trainors. Then decide what's going to be best and most beneficial to both you and your animals. Good luck!!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)">
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by greyhoundgirl</i><br><br><b>They are not all created equal, some use methods I don't like, such as crating a dog when it's 'bad'. That's negative reinforcement, which helps nobody. I never, nor should you ever put your dog in the crate if they do something 'bad'. They will associate the crate with being bad, and won't want to go in it. The crate should be a desired place to go.</b></div>
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see that is what I was thinking but my Dad does things differently. We Definetly have different views on the pets. I do something one way and my Dad tries another. So I am sure poor Eddy is just confused.<br><br><br><br>
He is 2.5 yrs neuturedwe do keep him in the crate while we are gone and he sleeps with my dad at night. He doesn't pee in the house at night usually When we aren't looking during the evening.He just peed!!! I put him outside right away when he does.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/shocked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":eek:"> He has been pretty good with the cat though <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
Thank you guys I will try some of these tips and hopefully they work.<br><br><br><br>
~Starr
 

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Uh oh...if you take him outside directly after he urinates in the house, you are inadvertently teaching him that if he wants to go outside all he has to do is urinate. Also, if you are trying one way of training Eddy, and your dad is doing something completely different, he WILL be confused. Dogs need clear and concise instructions to understand, not conflicting messages. Does he actually sleep in your dad's bed? If so, he might not see your dad as an authority figure. Dogs rely very much on body language and one message dogs send about dominance is that whoever is on top physically is on top in the pack as well. For instance, dogs that want to display dominance over another animal...they will usually place their paw over the other animals back, or place their head over the other animals. They will also actually display dominance by "humping" the other animal...such as a person's leg....seriously. So it's pretty important for him to be sleeping on the floor on his own dog bed as well.<br><br><br><br>
dotnetdiva's suggestions are so right on! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
Hey MaxPower....my dog is absolute in love with the cats. LOL. So that whole dogs hating cats and cats hating dogs thing is just a myth created by cartoons. Granted, some don't get along....but it's not because they're speciests.. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)">
 

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Herself, how do you potty train your dogs? That's what I do, take them outside when I catch them peeing. I say a firm "No", scoop them up, tail between the legs to stop the pee, and take them outside. It seems to work. Granted, it's a lot harder with an adult dog.
 

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kpickell, thats the best method, IMO<br><br>
but i do the 'NO, bad dog' and then take outside<br><br>
course my puppy weighed 70 pounds, so picking up wasnt an option... but grabbing a leash and running like hell outside was.<br><br>
and he ended up doing fine as far as that... he then only had like 2 accidents in the house<br><br>
why dont you move his crate to a place where there isnt carpet, such as in the kitchen?<br><br><br><br>
crates are great, just make sure you arent crating them too much<br><br>
the crate that i had for my pitbull (after he was finished crate training, which is when you need a small crate) was big enough that he and me could sit inside comfortably<br><br><br><br>
a good option would be to see a trainer, morningstarr...<br><br>
but dont stick to just one<br><br>
a good trainer will either let you watch a couple classes first or wont make you pay until after around the first 3 classes<br><br>
just remember theres great trainers, good trainers, okay trainers, crappy trainers, and trainers that shouldnt be trainers out there<br><br>
find one you like before you stick with one<br><br>
also, if you do decide to go the trainer route... make sure you AND your dad take the dog to the trainer<br><br>
its important for everyone heavily involved in the dogs life to be there for the training<br><br><br><br>
sometimes what helps a lot is if you seperate bathroom time from walking time<br><br>
when its bathroom time, the dog either goes in the yard or when you are walking at a nice slow pace<br><br>
when you are walking time, you walk fast and theres no time for sniffing or stopping<br><br>
this helps the dog know when its time to use the bathroom and when its not, and also gives him/her sufficent exercise time... plus good company because you need to praise him/her to keep them walking without stopping<br><br><br><br>
g'luck<br><br>
Caroline
 

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kpickell....with my first dog (he was a rescue and already 3 years old), he would pee so much it was ridiculous. I made sure that when I was home that he was with me at all times and watched his every move. That way, when I caught him in the act, I would give a sharp loud, "No" to startle him out of urinating. I would then wait 5 minutes to give him ample time to not connect the incident with being let outside and I would take him for a walk. Every time he would urinate outside, I would make a big deal about it saying, "good potty!" like it was the greatest thing he'd ever done. LOL. I would make sure that when I wasn't home that he had the kitchen to himself (basically "crating"). Also, I made sure that I took him outside 15 minutes after he was fed....and made sure that I took him out at LEAST 3 times a day.<br><br><br><br>
Whatever works, ...works. I'm for any method as long as there's no force used and the method reinforces positive behavior WITH positive behavior. It's all fine with me in that respect. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
One thing that was probably a bit different with my dog though is that a lot of the time he would urinate right in front of me because he was terrified that I was going to hurt him (he was formerly abused). My initial reaction was to yell "no" at him because he was urinating....until I discovered WHY he was doing it. I had to ignore that he was urinating and talk to him real excitedly and happily to make him feel better. It took some time to give him a relaxed atmosphere in which he could trust my me and my husband, and had no need to fear us. That, and he wasn't housebroken. LOL. Beyond that, he had all kinds of messed up problems...but he's happy now and that's just too cool!
 

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I can honestly say, I've never heard of allowing the dog to pee in the house, and then wait to take them outside. I work with greyhounds, who are more often then not abused in some way, be it neglect, physical abuse or verbal abuse. I have always been told by the many people within the organization that if the dog starts to pee in the house, there are a couple things that could be going on here.<br><br><br><br>
One, the dog actually needs to go outside, and they have given you signals that you have ignored, pacing, whining, running around, etc. If that's the case you need to learn to read when your dog needs to go out, or take them out ever couple hours.<br><br><br><br>
Two, the dog is wanting attention they are not getting. If this is the case, pay more attention to the dog. With positive reinforcement such as taking the dog outside directly after he pees in the house, and using key words, such as outside or potty, they will begin to associate whatever words you use, with outside and going potty outside. You are right making a big fuss over the dog peeing in the house will only cause either anxiety for the dog, which can make it happen more frequently, or the dog will realize they get attention when they pee in the house. Either way neither is what you want.<br><br><br><br>
I highly suggest trying a few options that were mentioned on this board, if that doesn't work, consult a few trainors or behavior specialists.<br><br><br><br>
I also highly recommend investing in some treats. They don't have to be expensive, but buy a big bag. Reward the dog for going outside and coming in. Reawrd the dog by giving them a treat when they go in there crate, regardless of difficulty in getting them to go in. Eventually they will go in with little effort and go potty outside, because they will get rewarded for it. My dogs wait at the back door, after coming in for their treat. They know they were good and expect it. Just as when I say 'crate', they bolt to them, sit down and wait for their treat. It's all positive reinforcement, and they know it.<br><br><br><br>
Try a few suggestions, what works for some may not for others, and vice versa. Try a few if he's still peeing, consult a trainor.<br><br><br><br>
I also agree with whoever said you need to establish yourself as the alpha figure in the 'pack'. Dogs determine this on their own, but with you, you need to make sure that you are the alpha of the whole group. Be firm, and reward for good behavior. Good luck!!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

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"Herself, how do you potty train your dogs? That's what I do, take them outside when I catch them peeing. I say a firm "No", scoop them up, tail between the legs to stop the pee, and take them outside."<br><br>
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Just wondering if after they do it outside a 'praising' and "good dog" and pettng is in order. Would that make them more inclined to see doing it outside as a good thing?
 
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