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I'm assuming that your baker's chunks aren't the same size as our baker chunks. If they are, then they'd probably have the number of ounces listed on the package.

For instance, we might have a 6 oz. bar broken into 12 chuncks, and you might have a 100 gram bar broken into 10 chunks.

I'm not sure if that sheds any light.

16 ounces are in a pound. 2.2 pounds are in a kilogram.

So that's 28 grams an ounce...

This is all very rough, I haven't taken a science course in a few years... I could be entirely wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by kristadb

Wow, I never thought I'd say that!


What is an ounce of chocolate, in reference to square Baker's chunks. Is 1 chunk (with 2 pieces attached) 1 oz or 2oz?
If the box states the total weight is 6 ounces and you have 6 squares, one square equals an ounce. It's been awhile since I bought Baker's chocolate but used to make brownies all the time. I believe one square is equal to one ounce.
 

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Do tell us how your cake comes out!

Agh Robert! I read that as you liked the metric system for some reason! And then I posted that we see eye to eye on something, then I reread it and noticed you said despised! I simply cannot even imagine despising a system that's based on common sense.
 

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[off-topic alert]

Mikie... at the risk of sending this thread off-topic, I'll keep this brief. It makes no sense that Canada would convert to some foreign measurement system that differs with our largest trading partner (the US). All it has done is provided added expenses and confusion between our two countries. If you'd like to discuss it further, feel free to start a Heap thread.

[/off-topic]
 

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http://www.onlineconversion.com/

This isn't awfully difficult.

Here is one way to find out how big a chunk you need to have an ounce. Find out how many grams of chocolate is in the whole package that you bought. It has to say on the label. Convert that to ounces. If it is, say, 8 ounces, then 1/8 of the whole thing is one ounce. You have to divide the thing you bought into 8 equal size pieces for each of them to be an ounce. If it is 6.4 ounces, then you have to divide it into 6.4 equal sized pieces, for each of them to be an ounce. That's right, you can easily divide it into 6 equal pieces, or 8 equal pieces, but 7 equal pieces isn't so easy. Neither is 6.4. What you have to do is extrapolate. Divide it into 6 equal pieces, measure one piece and make a note of its dimensions. Then divide it inot 8 equal pieces. Measure 1 of the pieces and note its dimensions. Make a piece equal to the difference in size between the 1/8 piece and the 1/6 piece, by cutting chunks off the 1/6 piece until it becomes as small as the 1/8 piece. You'll now have two 1/8 pieces, and one differnce piece. Then estimate 4/5 of the difference piece and add that piece back to one of the 1/8 pieces.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
woohoo! margarine AND chocolate is a success LOL

The cake, thus far, is excellent. Well, personally, I find it revolting, but it's an expresso-based cake, so I won't like it.

I love the metric system. It is far more easier to follow then the US system. That's ok. They'll come to the light side of the force soon enough.

Kreeli, I don't know either. I read the box both sides and inside. I even read the recipes, just in case. But everywhere, the chunks were referred to as a "chunk" not a measurement. And the grams measurement is off, as it puts each chunk at about 1.5 oz each. Perhaps I got a faulty box??

16 oz in a pound? /makes note. Pounds is a measurement I can grasp.
 
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