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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is casein an animal poroduct? I've seen some "Lactose Free Veggie Cheese Slices" but one of the ingredients is "Casein - a dried lactose free dairy protein" (according to the label). Has this come from a cow, or as a vegan would I be alright eating this stuff?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
casein is a milk protein. can come from any lactating animal. (i.e.- cow, goat)

If you are allergic to dairy products, as I am, that is what part you are allergic to. the protein.

It is very annoying. I cannot have soy cheese or pretty much anything else that says 'dairy free'. because when they state that, it usually only means there is no lactose in it.

dairy free creamer, has casein

dairy free whipped topping, has casein

dairy free cheese,such as veggie shreds, has casein

so on, and so on, and so on......

It is added to foods to either make them 'creamy' or to make them melt evenly.
 

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If it says dairy free and contains a dairy derived ingredient, I'd be writing to them telling them that their labelling policy is awful.

But casein is a milk protein. It is what makes cheese melt, and as such it is put into soy cheeses, because these are aimed at the lactose-intolerant market as opposed to the vegan market.
 

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"Is casein an animal poroduct?"

The answer is evident from the statement "Casein - a dried lactose free dairy protein." Dairy protein. Dairy is just another word for milk-derived. This makes it absolutely clear that casein comes from milk. It could conceivably be goat's milk rather than cow's milk -- but usually that is indicated, if it is.
 

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"I cannot have soy cheese or pretty much anything else that says 'dairy free'. because when they state that, it usually only means there is no lactose in it."

Not so. Dairy-free means dairy-free. However "non-dairy" products can have dairy in them. If a dairy-like product has either no dairy, or has only a small amount of dairy, or is simply less than predominantly dairy, it must be labeled as "non-dairy." This is entirely different than "dairy-free" which must not have even a trace of dairy.
 
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