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I didn't know that gelatin has animal biproducts...ignorant, I know. So please help me. What else has animal parts in it?
 

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When we lived in Louisiana a lot of boxed rices had chicken fat. And cowboy beans often had bacon.
 

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Marshmellows, they have geletin in them.

You can make your own useing the root of the marshmallow plant but it is not the same soft spongy sweet, but it is v. tasty and is a cough surpresent
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by veggiemama-of2 View Post

I didn't know that gelatin has animal biproducts...ignorant, I know. So please help me. What else has animal parts in it?
I haven't eaten gelatin since reading what it was made of at the age of 8.
 

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Speaking of beetles. A sign at my local Krogers reads "We may spray our produce with vegetable oil, beeswax, or shellac." Yummy, apples and tomatoes coated with bettle juice.
 

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Well, now that others have mentioned some ingredients you may not have heard of before, I'm going to advise that you take care when buying cosmetics/personal products. Some things are obvious: 9 out 10 lip balms contain beeswax and/or lanolin so that can sometimes be a pain.

But I know I've found a few things over the years that have suprised me. I've found gelatin in lotions before (what use could gelatin possibly have in lotion... to make it chewy??
) and sometimes things will appear all fine and good until you get down to the last 3 ingredients and one of them, for some unknown reason, will be like, squalene (substance usually obtained from sharks' livers) or lanolin, or carmine, or some other completely unnecessary thing that could easily have been left out without affecting the quality of the product.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kpickell View Post

Speaking of beetles. A sign at my local Krogers reads "We may spray our produce with vegetable oil, beeswax, or shellac." Yummy, apples and tomatoes coated with bettle juice.
Where was the sign posted? I'm wondering if my Kroger has the same sign... I've never seen one. Sounds like a good reason to use a vegetable wash that dissolves that stuff.
 

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for me and sorry if this was mentioned before but when i first went veggie it was canned vegetable soup..i was suprised that it had beef stock in it...
 

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Originally Posted by Tesseract View Post

Where was the sign posted? I'm wondering if my Kroger has the same sign... I've never seen one. Sounds like a good reason to use a vegetable wash that dissolves that stuff.
Right in the produce section, on a black sign hanging above the veggies that were in the section where the veggies get misted.

PS: I sent them an email about it Saturday, asked them why they are coating their vegetables with an animal secretion, so I'm curious to get a response back. (ETA: I know the reason they do it--looks prettier and lasts longer, I just wanted to send an email letting them know I didn't like it
)
 

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Animal husbandry is an an intrinsic part of mostly all the known cultures of the world, and little distinction is made between products of animal husbandry and plant husbandry, in the world of commerce. In the industrialized world, we have the phenomena of few products being made from "scratch." Instead we have extreme specialization, with one specialist often not knowing much about the other specialties. Thus single products become made by numerous people, none of whom knows how to make the whole product from scratch, or even how it was made!

The job of the Earthly Origin of Commercial Materials Educational Organization, which I started with a few friends about 8 years ago, but which is now run almost single-handedly by me -- and I am getting on in years -- is to find out. To do research into how products are made. It is almost as if less were known about how human-made products were made, than how naturally occurring materials developed in the earth! And there does not seem to be any organization doing this. The few lists on the net seem to all be copies of one another, and are full of inaccuracies.

If you want to know what is in a food product, the label will often have some information, and the federally mandated ingredients section, on products sold interstate, is a must-read in the United States. In Europe, there are also regulations requiring food products to have a certain amount of ingredient labeling. These ingredient labels may be the best source of information at the present time.

I'm not sure what the situation is in many countries.

In the US you need to be careful of labels on products sold intrastate, as state laws may not require labels, and false labels, if they can't be proven false, may go unrecognized by anyone. For example the breads that supermarkets sell and bake from frozen dough -- i've often seen them obviously mislabeled. A favorite way to mislabel them is to put sesame seeds all over them and not mention sesame seeds in the ingredient list. For someone allergic to sesame seeds, this could be disasterous.

Unfortunately, most of the reason for labelling is so that people can avoid foods they are allergic to, or be assured that foods meet cultural standards -- for example some people don't want to eat something labeled simply as "maple syrup" when it is really 50% maple syrup and 50% sugar syrup, with artificial maple flavor. This would be "fooling" people in a way that is unacceptable in western culture. However not mentioning animal ingredients is fooling people in a way that is culturally accepted.

To this end, many large sub-cultures have established their own ingredient-checking organizations. The union of rabbis checks for kosher, for example. The vegetarian subculture has not done as good a job of certifying foods as being veg or vegan, as kosher Jews have done. This is why I started the eoMeo. And I invite people to join with me, and make the eoMeo stronger.
 

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The list is something like: soaps, cosmetics, personal hygene items (lipstick etc.) processed food (marshmallows, gelatian etc.), Cheese coagulated using retin, cleaners, candles, waxes, lubricants, flavorings, many vitamins & suppliments (chondroiten, calcium, iron, B-12), pharmicuticals, clothing (silk, leather, wool, feathers, fur), jewelry (pearls, some things made with bone/ivory, mother of pearl, teeth, feathers), some inlays for furniture, musical instruments (bone, mother of pearl), violin & guitar strings, Piano keys, art supplies & pigments (hide glue, paintbrushes, paint), photography (film), airplane lubricant and runway foam, hydraulic break fluid...Printers ink for glossy magazine pages, The Road (asphalt), Automobile and bycycle tires (steric acid), Drywall (the walls of the house), cement blocks... old houses (horse hair in walls).

pharmaceutical:

trypsin (for cleansing wounds and ulcers), corticotrophin (for treating allergies, arthritis and respiratory diseases), iron (for treating anemia), thrombin (for blood coagulation)... thyroid, insulin for diabetics, and a lot more!
 

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soaps, cosmetics, personal hygene items (lipstick etc.) processed food (marshmallows, gelatian etc.), Cheese coagulated using retin, cleaners, candles, waxes, lubricants, flavorings, many vitamins & suppliments (chondroiten, calcium, iron, B-12), pharmicuticals, clothing (silk, leather, wool, feathers, fur), jewelry (pearls, some things made with bone/ivory, mother of pearl, teeth, feathers), some inlays for furniture, musical instruments (bone, mother of pearl), violin & guitar strings, Piano keys, art supplies & pigments (hide glue, paintbrushes, paint), photography (film), airplane lubricant and runway foam, hydraulic break fluid...Printers ink for glossy magazine pages, The Road (asphalt), Automobile and bycycle tires (steric acid), Drywall (the walls of the house), cement blocks... old houses (horse hair in walls).
Most cosmetics do have some animal matter in them, but not all. For processed foods, you just have to read the ingredient list. A few items are exempt from having complete ingredient lists (beer for example) but may have incomplete lists, which are therefore misleading. Many food items are vegan or near vegan (may have, for example, a tiny amount of vitamins, of animal source, added). Most pharmaceuticals are largely non-animal but pills for example will have animal materials in them to bind materials together or coat them. How much animal matter can fit in a pill, however? Not much. Guitar strings are generally nylon these days, or steel, not real "gut" !!! Surgical sutures are generally polypropylene (permanent) (a brand name is Prolene) or a mixture of glycolic acid and lactic acid called called "polyglactin;" a brand name is Vicryl (absorbable).

Piano keys these days (the last 30 years or more) have plastic resin keytops. A few have ivory, often from second hand sources. However the actions[/b] have a few small strips of leather, and the hammers that strike the string, as well as the dampers that stop the sound when you lift the key -- are wool. Period. I have years of experience as a piano tuner-technician and I know this area with a great deal of certainty. I used to keep a few ivories from ancient pianos to repair other ancient pianos. But most customers were willing to accept a new yellowish looking plastic "ivorine" keytop next to their old yellow ivory keytops. New plastic is not extemely brittle like old ivory is.

Most furniture and pianos these days are glued together with aliphatic resin glues, not animal based glues. Some custom handmade furniture may be made by craftsmen who have the mistaken belief that animal based glues are stronger and last longer. They aren't; they don't. They are harder to work with and more expensive. They are rarely used in commercial furniture or pianos, these days (for the last 20 years or so).

It is very easy to distinguish resin-fiber bristle brushes from animal hair, by looking closely at the fibers.

Commercial lubricants are largely petroleum based but may have animal-based additives.

Horse hair insulation in walls, if it exists, is REALLY REALLY old. I've never seen it. But violin bows -- horsehair?

Wallboard for houses is largely gypsum with a paper coating. There may be small amounts of animal materials, but virtually anything could have small amounts of animal matter. It is almost impossible to tell which paints may have some animal matter added, and which don't. But most modern "latex" paint have very little animal matter, if any. Although they don't have any latex either. They have plastic resins made into a water emulsion with lots of water and tiny amounts of "other things" that vary and are generally trade secrets and finding out what is in any brand is pretty hopeles.
 

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"But I know I've found a few things over the years that have suprised me. I've found gelatin in lotions before (what use could gelatin possibly have in lotion... to make it chewy?? ) and sometimes things will appear all fine and good until you get down to the last 3 ingredients and one of them, for some unknown reason, will be like, squalene (substance usually obtained from sharks' livers) or lanolin, or carmine, or some other completely unnecessary thing that could easily have been left out without affecting the quality of the product."

Cosmetics, lotions, shampoos, hair goop -- all are likely to have keratin in them -- keratin being another word for gelatin, as is collagen. Gelatin is what the commercial product made from collagen and keratin, is called. It is the word of commerce. Collagen and keratin are the biologist name for the substance in animal tissue that gelatin "comes from." It is the protein content of hair, nails, and outer layer of skin. A callous is mostly keratin. As is a wart. Both are thickened areas of outer layer of skin. The callus being a normal respons to irriation; the wart being a viral infection or tumor that produces lots of skin which quicky converts to outer skin (dead skin).
 
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