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I had 3 jalapeno pepper plants which I took indoors each winter; this was the 3rd year I had them, but I think they're all dead/dying. I was taking cuttings of my tomato plants and growing them indoors each winter, but they might be on their way out too.

One of my co-workers gave me a clump of chives this year which I planted in my herb garden outside; they bloomed and set seed, and I think I'll try planting some of the seeds for indoor growing instead of planting them all outside.

EDITED TO ADD: I adopted a few goldfish from a friend's koi pond 12 years ago. About a week ago, I collected a sample of duckweed to grow indoors; they might like it as a food (not that I'll be feeding them ONLY that)... I'm picking out the snails as I find them and putting them back in the pond a couple of blocks away, where they came from.
 

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Update: my jalapeno plants all died. Pepper plants are actually perennial, but maybe 3 years is sort of their maximum life span. And the duckweed got overgrown with algae- so I tossed them, and any small critters who may have been hanging out, back into the pond they came from.

BUT- my tomato cutting rooted and is doing very well. I'll have to re-pot it soon. I planted some mustard green and kale seeds, with the kale seeds being from my own plant which over-wintered (outdoors) successfully last winter.
 

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I prefer to grow microgreens in indoor as they are the best source of nutrients. Nowadays, microgreen kits are available in the market with different flavors like broccoli, basil, sandwich supreme which easily help to grow these veggies into your home. They are too delicious and very easy to grow and harvest. I grow broccoli and arugula microgreens as these veggies are my favorite one.
 

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A few months ago, I noticed a branch of a tomato plant being tossed out in the trash- but it was still green. I brought it home and got it to root, and now it's overwintering in a big pot, along with one of the two pepper plants I dug up and brought inside. They're sweet peppers, but longer than a bell pepper. There are peppers on them, but no blossoms- so after these grow to full size and ripen, I suppose I won't get any more until they go back outside in the spring.

One of them has what I thought would be two small kale plants from my own seeds I planted- but they look more like Mustard Green plants. I have both kinds of seeds- so they could be either. I also am overwintering two of my kale plants from my garden. They'll also bloom and make their own seeds next year, provided they survive.
 
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Right now I have a jar of alfalfa sprouts on my windowsill. Sometimes I pop produce scraps in a pot of dirt. This works with the end of a head of lettuce, celery or carrot tops. I’ve grown herbs like basil inside before.
 

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I've been keeping the two kale plants I mentioned in a cold place (my vestibule) for a time. (Evidently our winters are too cold for kale to survive the winter, at least sometimes. The plant I got these kale seeds from had survived an uncharectaristically-mild winter and produced seeds the next summer. I have tried to leave mostly-harvested kale plants in the ground over the winter since then, but they didn't make it.) These recently started putting out new leaves, and I've put them in a bright, south-facing window where my houseplants are.

Leafy vegetables such as lettuce, most herbs, and kale don't need quite as much light as other vegetables such as tomatoes, corn, or beans (and they're also smaller!), so I think they're supposed to generally do better indoors.
 
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