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"The only way to be healthy as a vegan is to eat fruits and vegetables. You shouldnt eat any grains or added sugar, it's just easier to eat meat."

I was asking for advice on another site, but thats one of the answers that I got. lol I think it's obvious to me that the statement is false, and he was just assuming I'd believe eating meat is my best way to be healthy, and without it I'll have to limit my options. However, I thought I'd ask you all what you think. I want other opinions. Am I missing something?

I thought grains could be a good thing. I eat a lot of unhealthy grains, but there are good things out there. What about quinoa?

I'm asking because as much as my immediate reaction is to reject what he said, I have heard some people say they stay away from grains all together. What say you? I need info!

Another criticism of the vegan diet that concerns me, especially as someone who needs to lose weight, that I read on another site.

"However, I still recommend meat consumption, and for a number of reasons: caloric efficiency, blood sugar management, and human biology. It takes more calories to get adequate amounts of protein on a vegetarian diet. Living on beans and tofu increases the amount of carbohydrates in one's diet significantly. And the human body most certainly handles - and benefits from - a bit of flesh."

What are your (educated) opinions on this, and any resources I can turn to. I've been vegan for years, but I'm really trying to educate myself about food intake and health issues like this.
 

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Quinoa is actually a seed. But as far as I'm aware grains like oats, brown rice and buckwheat are healthy, high in protein, fibre and slow burning energy. I'm no expert though.

Was he including seeds, nuts and beans in his definition of 'fruits and vegetables'?
 

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There are conflicting philosophies out there, so it depends on which you subscribe to. I personally believe in a high fat (roughly 50% of caloric intake), which has kept me in good shape for years. Carbohydrates, including grains, are not necessarily "bad," but I'd agee that it's much easier to overdo on a vegan diet that is naturally extremely low fat. I'm vegetarian, but if I were vegan I'd be eating a lot of nuts and coconut. I wouldn't necessarily give up grains, but I wouldn't consider them a staple either.
 

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Sorry for the typos, I'm on my phone
 

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I've been talking to quite a few vegans, some of whom have been vegan longer than I've been alive. If we were lacking in some nutrient, we would have known by now
There's no argument for eating animal products. Research suggests a healthier lifestyle without dairy, also


The China Study is a good read for the health aspect of a vegan diet.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chunkyvegan View Post

"The only way to be healthy as a vegan is to eat fruits and vegetables. You shouldnt eat any grains or added sugar, it's just easier to eat meat."

I was asking for advice on another site, but thats one of the answers that I got. lol I think it's obvious to me that the statement is false, and he was just assuming I'd believe eating meat is my best way to be healthy, and without it I'll have to limit my options. However, I thought I'd ask you all what you think. I want other opinions. Am I missing something?

I thought grains could be a good thing. I eat a lot of unhealthy grains, but there are good things out there. What about quinoa?

I'm asking because as much as my immediate reaction is to reject what he said, I have heard some people say they stay away from grains all together. What say you? I need info!

Another criticism of the vegan diet that concerns me, especially as someone who needs to lose weight, that I read on another site.

"However, I still recommend meat consumption, and for a number of reasons: caloric efficiency, blood sugar management, and human biology. It takes more calories to get adequate amounts of protein on a vegetarian diet. Living on beans and tofu increases the amount of carbohydrates in one's diet significantly. And the human body most certainly handles - and benefits from - a bit of flesh."

What are your (educated) opinions on this, and any resources I can turn to. I've been vegan for years, but I'm really trying to educate myself about food intake and health issues like this.
Oh yes and it is perfectly possible to have a high protein low calorie vegan diet. Seitan has a very similar calorie/ protein ratio to beef. [http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/3477/2 http://www.calories-nutrition.buddyslim.com/seitan/] and foods like spinach are very high in protein compared to their calorie content. The main issue for a low calorie high protein diet (whether omnivore or veg*n) is avoiding empty calories- fizzy drinks, white refined flours, alcohol, white rice, sugar etc.
 

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Mo'fos don't know what they're talking about it.
There are thousands, if not millions of veg*ns walking around today, proving that the diet isn't hard, that many of us can eat whatever the hell we want, and that we're NOT a sickly, malnourished lot.

Screw whatever conflicting reports come out - the proof is in the dairy-free pudding.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chunkyvegan View Post

"The only way to be healthy as a vegan is to eat fruits and vegetables. You shouldnt eat any grains or added sugar, it's just easier to eat meat."

"However, I still recommend meat consumption, and for a number of reasons: caloric efficiency, blood sugar management, and human biology. It takes more calories to get adequate amounts of protein on a vegetarian diet. Living on beans and tofu increases the amount of carbohydrates in one's diet significantly. And the human body most certainly handles - and benefits from - a bit of flesh."

What are your (educated) opinions on this, and any resources I can turn to. I've been vegan for years, but I'm really trying to educate myself about food intake and health issues like this.
I think whoever told you this is full of crap and these statements are ridiculous. There are vegans here on this forum who have been vegan since birth and are absolutely fine.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chunkyvegan View Post

What are your (educated) opinions on this, and any resources I can turn to. I've been vegan for years, but I'm really trying to educate myself about food intake and health issues like this.
Those "criticisms" are just nonsense. It's really not worth arguing with those people. If you want to learn more about diet and health issues, stick to authoritative sources -- try the American Dietetic Association, the USDA, Vegan Health, and the Vegan RD blog.
 

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In my experience, yes, refined carbs such as white sugar and starches can be dangerous in excess. In moderation though, definitely no problem! Whole grains/complex carbs such as quinoa, barley, oats, whole wheat, etc. should be part of your regular diet. If you want a good guideline, one I've heard for good vegan nutrition is to eat 1/4 whole grains, 1/4 plant protein, and 1/2 fruits and veg, although others on here may have other guidelines which have worked for them.
 

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That's bull****. In the macrobiotic diet one of the main advices are that you should eat grains with EVERY meal if you can. That's how good they are for you. Full of fiber and will protect you from cancer and help you with keeping your digestion smooth and aid in weightloss.... almost a magical food really. This is according to a book on vegan nutrition that I read anyway. Bread should be okey to as long as it's not the white stuff and as long as you don't overdo it.

The only thing you should watch out for is sugar, white bread and junk food in general, and of course to eat balanced meals. That's my two cents
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by _charlotte_ View Post

That's bull****. In the macrobiotic diet one of the main advices are that you should eat grains with EVERY meal if you can. That's how good they are for you. Full of fiber and will protect you from cancer and help you with keeping your digestion smooth and aid in weightloss.... almost a magical food really. This is according to a book on vegan nutrition that I read anyway. Bread should be okey to as long as it's not the white stuff and as long as you don't overdo it.

The only thing you should watch out for is sugar, white bread and junk food in general, and of course to eat balanced meals. That's my two cents
i'm gonna toss in another penny and we'll make it three cents
.
 

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Also, was this person saying that if you ate meat, then you could eat sugar and grains?
 

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Not many people put in the time and effort required to, not only figure out how to make a vegan diet work in general, but how to sculpt the diet to meet their particular needs (Macro-nutrient profile, etc.). There isn't a whole lot of correct info out there on a very tight, nutritionally sound vegan diet. So it's up to people to figure it out for themselves. That being said, when people look at a vegan diet, and see it as healthy, they also see the trade off that is; If they stick to their standard american diet, no one will tell them they should change, no one who is part of the majority anyways. As long as the majority eats unhealthy, people will tend to see it as a better option because they are more likely to be / remain accepted by the majority.

I am constantly discovering new things. No one in my family eats remotely like I do, or strives to "fix the leaks" in their diet. My diet was built from scratch, through trial and error, from the ground up, and continues to be torn down and changed. The vegan diet requires a lot of work because there's so little help available from people that have done it for long periods of time.

To be honest any way of eating requires more work than most people are willing to put in. No "diet" just works. "Diet" is not the way to look at the way you eat. Look at it as a lifestyle.

So when you see someone bash the vegan diet because it is missing something, it is difficult, etc. Remember that they simply weren't willing to put in the time to make the diet work for them. And you can be assured that their current diet doesn't meet their needs either. Anyone who gives up so easily, wouldn't be capable of being healthy on any diet. Because no diet 'just works', not for extended periods of time anyway.

My opinion and experience.
 

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Your devil's advocate is not correct, however it is true that eating more fruits and vegetables will certainly help you become healthier, regardless of whether you are a meat eater, a vegetarian or a vegan. Just being a vegan doesn't mean you're healthy (such as a vegan that eats lots of junk food and refined carbs), just like being a meat eater doesn't mean you're unhealthy (such as someone that eats lean meats and plenty of veggies). Common sense.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chunkyvegan View Post

"The only way to be healthy as a vegan is to eat fruits and vegetables. You shouldnt eat any grains or added sugar, it's just easier to eat meat."
Does this person think seeds are beans are okay?

Find out if this vegetable-only person eats the following:

Fresh corn on the cob: It's a grain
Green peas: They are legumes
Green beans: Hard to eat them without swallowing the beans.
Okra: They are about 50% seeds.
Peanut products? They're legumes as well.

Still though, corn's in season right now. I'm willing to bet your friend eats corn from the produce department.

*** The more I read that person's post, the more it feels like just another omni talking out his @$$.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BLR View Post

Not many people put in the time and effort required to, not only figure out how to make a vegan diet work in general, but how to sculpt the diet to meet their particular needs (Macro-nutrient profile, etc.). There isn't a whole lot of correct info out there on a very tight, nutritionally sound vegan diet.
Not only are you wrong about the lack of nutritional information on a plant based diet, you also make it sound as if people can eat all the crap they please and remain in ignorance of nutritional principles as long as they play it safe by making sure to eat plenty of carcass and lactation, but in order to be a healthy vegan they need to become scientists who must carefully balance every little thing or succumb to anemia or kwashiorkor. They are millions more sick carnists out there than sick vegans, and while there are more of them than there are of us, I have no doubt that the percentages of illness are way higher for carnists than they are for plant eaters.
 
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