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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm planting a number of unusual bush fruits in my garden this planting season: Goumi, Pomegranate, Seaberry, Jujube, and Rugosa Rose. I'm planting these as a hedge around the perimeter of my largest garden.

Anyone here have experience growing any of these? Which of these have you eaten? I've eaten pomegranates (which isn't all that unusual I guess) and rose hips.

I'm buying the plants from one of my favorite nurseries:

http://www.onegreenworld.com/
 

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I have rugosas with some good rose hips. I dont think I live in an area where I can plant subtropical fruit-- is any good for indoor or container growing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Those are all pretty large plants but I think there are some small Pomegranate varieties. But they like a lot of heat and sun, so I think it might be hard to grow them indoors. The Seaberry and Goumi are quite hardy, especially the Seaberry which grows in Siberia.
 

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Thanks, I am about to expand my garden, and think it would be cool to use plants that provide food as well. I would like a few dwarf (not miniture) apple trees as well. Do these berries make good pie, jam, wine? Or what are they used for? Sea berries are kind of nice and orange-- I can swear they remind me of some sort of ornemental that I see in the southwest a lot-- I'll look into it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
"Sea Berry\t

Hippophae rhamnoides

A new and very valuable plant for North American gardeners, Sea Berry is very popular in many regions of the world. Sea Berry is native to both Central Asia, reaching as far as Western China, and in Europe, in countries around the Baltic Sea. Among Sea Berry's many attributes are exceptional ornamental value, tasty and healthful fruit, cover and food for wildlife, and ability to grow in and improve poor soils.As an ornamental, Sea Berry is prized for its attractive, narrow, grayish-green foliage and its fall display of large clusters of bright orange-yellow berries, which cover the branches and can persist well into winter.Sea Berry is an extremely hardy and valuable fruiting plant. It is unique in its ability to produce crops in the most inhospitable areas. The fruit is very high in Vitamin C (about 7 times more than lemons), Vitamin A, and E, and has a pleasant acidic flavor which, when sweetened, makes delicious juice. During the Cold War, East Germany used Sea Berry as a healthful substitute for orange juice. The fruit is also unique for its oil content, which is used as a treatment for burns and skin diseases as well as for ulcers and other illnesses.We have attended three international Sea Berry conferences and have observed its cultivation and use in Germany, Russia, and China. Sea Berry has become a valuable commercial crop in Germany where it is harvested by machine and made into delicious juice and other products. Sea Berry's German name is Sanddorn and if you have the opportunity to visit Germany, you will find juice and other items in many stores. We harvest our fruit by hand or by cutting off the fruit laden branches and freezing them. The frozen berries can easily be shaken off and, after thawing, make great juice."

http://www.onegreenworld.com//index.php?cPath=4_117

Those ornamentals you're thinking of, I think might be Pyracantha, which has sort of orangey-red fruits (inedible). I'm glad you're going to put edible ornamentals in your new garden design! I'm very interested in edible gardening myself, and I'm trying to concentrate on edible or useful plants versus simply ornamental ones (though I do have a few of those anyway).
 

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I also love pomegranates. If you grow more than you can eat, I'll be happy to take them off your hands.
 

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Yeah I read that at the site- - I also did think of pirocathana--- I might have been thinking of russian olive too-- anyway it sounds interesting. Those blue berry things look cool too.

your just wasting your space if you put in things that you cant eat in my opinion.
 

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We grew pomegranetes in our yard growing up. I don't remember doing anything special to them to keep them coming. Of course my mom does have a freakish green thumb. Anything she plants will grow even if she isn't tending to it. I'm so jealous. Good luck!
 

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I've seen some rugosa rosehips that are really huge like crab apples. I have two varieties that are supposed to make big fruit but they were only moderate in size and yield. The Hippophae rhamnoides is potentially invasive and some provinces in western Canada are noticing its spread from cultivation so take care.
 
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