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adapt. evolve. become
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I've been vegetarian for two years, tried to go vegan countless times (every few months since I started vegetarianism)... the amount of times I try and fail kind of discourage me.. I want to go vegan & give up dairy and eggs, but a few months later I crave and give in. I hate that I give in. Not sure how to get back on veganism. I'd re-watch the videos that made me go vegan, but just thinking about them make me depressed... Hmm what should I do?
 

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I did exactly the same thing for YEARS before it stuck so don't worry about it


Watching animal cruelty type stuff can be useful as a kind of aversion therapy but as you said it is depressing. Besides sometimes positive reinforcement is more effective than negative, and it's certainly a lot more fun.

My advice is to make it about adding new things to your life rather than focusing on what you are giving up, know what I mean? It's about exploration, not deprivation. Look at vegan food porn! Read vegan cookbooks, find delicious looking recipes you want to try and make them. Look at all the vegan products available (shoes, makeup, cleaners, perfumes, clothes, etc.) and think about all the awesome stuff you can buy in the future or treat yourself now if you have the money. Try making vegan desserts! If it's fun it's a lot more likely to stick, personally I'm the hedonistic type so thinking of going vegan as this big difficult change I was making because people are cruel just bummed me out and made me more likely to relapse or lose focus.

And most importantly don't beat yourself up if you slip, it's a process. Incorporate more vegan meals into your diet, start getting into the habit of buying vegan stuff when you go grocery shopping and focus on the stuff you're doing right. Every time you eat a vegan meal/buy a vegan product consider it a win
 

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Throw out the eggs and dairy and don't buy more.

I've been meat, egg and dairy free for over 3 months and had no real cravings for any of them and they used to be a staple of my diet. If you're eating processed crap you might consider replacing that with more whole plant type of foods, imo helps with the cravings.
 

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In the beginning (I went 'cold turkey' from omni to vegan) it helped me to find vegan substitutes for my favourite meat-based meals. Such things as shepherd's pie, 'carbonara' sauce, meatloaf etc.

Now I find that if I eat a filling breakfast (like porridge with soy milk, walnuts, stewed apple, cinnamon), then a fresh, healthy lunch (such as a massive salad roll), followed by a hearty dinner like vegan shepherd's pie, I'm VERY satisfied and never feel like I'm missing out. I also enjoy lattes (coffee and/or chai) with soy milk as my treat, every day! I'm also enjoying the huge summer fruit selection (I'm in Oz).

I've only been vegan for around 4 months, but I honestly don't think I could go back.


Good luck!
 

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adapt. evolve. become
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah I think I'm just looking at veganism the wrong way. I think I'm ready to try again this weekend.
Another thing is, I have a hard time with the food budget, and getting the grocery bill to 100$ or under for two people a week.
 

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It is possible to eat cheaply vegan, easier than any other diet really, but it will take planning on your part. I find that if I meal plan a few days ahead and shop with that list, I spend way less and make healthier meals. Find out which fruit and veg are local, in season, and abundant, and look up recipes for these. Local farmers here often have stands selling their fresh produce for cheap.

There are great videos out there for ideas and techniques; I learned to roll sushi watching one.
I love reading recipes and food blogs, so I try to make a habit of actually turning this into an organized plan with a list and coupons.

And I loved Werewolf Girl's whole post.
 

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Originally Posted by Pirate Huntress View Post

I've been vegetarian for two years, tried to go vegan countless times (every few months since I started vegetarianism)... the amount of times I try and fail kind of discourage me.. I want to go vegan & give up dairy and eggs, but a few months later I crave and give in. I hate that I give in. Not sure how to get back on veganism. I'd re-watch the videos that made me go vegan, but just thinking about them make me depressed... Hmm what should I do?
Why don't you start out eating vegan one or two days a week? Kinda like "meat free monday" except the vegan version?
 

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Usually cravings are not for animal products per-se, but for things like salt and fat, or the taste and texture components.

If you're not much into cooking, you can pretty well eliminate dairy cravings with enough olive oil and sea salt. Cheese has copious amounts of fat in it, so if you want to kill the craving, you really have to pour it on (replace the fat with more fat, not with vegetables, and wean yourself off as the cravings slowly subside).

Just make sure to stick with as healthy fats as you can (even flax oil, if you can find some that's not rancid [that means it should be refrigerated when you buy it]). Stay clear of coconut or palm oils, and avoid trans-fats.

If you have a blender and can cook a bit, you can also make nut cheeses (ground up nuts help absorb the oil to make it less oily). Starch helps too with absorbing oils (though you have to cook it).

You can make a reasonable cheese sauce with:

Tapioca starch + ground nuts + water (or soy milk) + oil + vinegar + lemon juice or citric acid + loads of salt.

I'd have to guess at amounts... but...

Maybe 4 tablespoons of tapioca starch, a cup of raw (shelled) sunflower seeds, a cup of raw almonds or cashews, a cups of soy milk, a cup of olive oil, two tablespoons of vinegar, half a lemon juiced, one to three tablespoons of salt (depending on how salty you like it). Add some black pepper, rosemary and basil if you like those. Crushed red pepper is good too, if you like spice. If you have nutritional yeast, and like it, you can add about two to four tablespoons of that.

Blend the nuts up first without water until they turn into a coarse poweder (like crumbly sand), then add the oil and blend it some more. Then add everything else except the starch, then add the starch.

After you blend it all up (maybe thick pea soup consistency), then bring it to a simmer on the stove top. It'll thicken up and get gooey. Use something to stir it and scrape it off the sides and bottom, folding it into itself. Oil will try to separate, mix it back in as well as you can (as it cools down, it's easier to mix). If you can find a little soy lecithin (from a health food store), that'll keep the oil from separating as much (half a tablespoon should be enough- it doesn't take much, you'd blend it in with everything else).

That makes a kind of stringy sticky and high fat cheese sauce.
I only use sunflower seeds because they're cheaper than almonds/cashews (but 100% sunflower seeds tastes bad, so I recommend using half). You can use all almond or cashew if you want to- but it's not necessary, as long as the sunflower seeds make up half or less of the nuts, you can't really taste them much.

The most important elements:

Nuts (for mass), oil (for fat), acid (for the sourness of cheese- the vinegar and lemon juice balance each other out if you use both, though I recommend a few pinches of anhydrous citric acid instead of lemon juice), salt (of course, for the saltiness), starch (for the gooeyness).

If you don't want to cook, but you don't like just adding oil, vegan margarine/vegan mayo and extra salt slathered onto things will tend to kill the cheese cravings as well, (those are a little cheaper than commercial vegan cheese).

Two people can eat for a budget $60 a week easily. You could both eat for $60/month if you wanted to. You'll have to cook, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
60$ a week would be a big improvement... I guess we just get too much pre-packaged food, but I'm not sure how to plan meals so that they are cheaper. How much would making your own fake meat help, instead of buying it?
I don't have a blender yet, I just have a food processor, but when I get one I will try it. I think cooking would be worth it, and I could always get help.
Thanks, everyone for the advise.


Also I do eat vegan at least once a week.
 

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A food processor is better than a blender if it's a good one (larger base, easier to grind things up). Don't worry about getting a blender.

Making your own fake meats is maybe 10% - 20% of the cost of buying them.

A $3 package of veggie grounds should have cost you about 50 cents to make.
 

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Originally Posted by vepurusg View Post

A $3 package of veggie grounds should have cost you about 50 cents to make.
yeeeeees
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by vepurusg View Post

A food processor is better than a blender if it's a good one (larger base, easier to grind things up). Don't worry about getting a blender.

Making your own fake meats is maybe 10% - 20% of the cost of buying them.

A $3 package of veggie grounds should have cost you about 50 cents to make.
Plus, it tastes better when you make your own. At least mine does
 

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recipe?
 

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Yew can do it


Don't look at it as failing, look at it this way: Every day you eat vegan, every meal you eat vegan - you are helping
If you slip up, you don't need to run straight back into full-fledged dairy/egg eating... you can carry on vegan. The more comfy you get with it and the more routine it seems, the less slips will happen. I totally agree that getting excited about some good vegan recipes is the way to go!! I got so passionate about cooking and baking when I went vegan, it seemed like a fun challenge of "can I make the ultimate vegan cupcake? cookie? stirfry? lasagna?" etc... it was great.

So, give'r another go
You don't need to watch the graphic movies - you know, you've seen them - you don't need to be coerced or convinced to be vegan. You just need to find a fun way to turn it into a habit and a lifestyle, and find delicious alternatives to those non-vegan snacks/meals that you loved so much
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
well my sister came back for a while and made some vegan wings for us hehe.. she isn't even veg*n herself but she makes great veggie meat. then I made some vegan ranch & it was the bomb.
 

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Originally Posted by Envy View Post

recipe?
I can give you a rough one:

Table spoon of olive oil, a diced onion. Saute the onion until it starts browning. Add a tablespoon or two of salt. Let it go a bit longer until it's nice and golden brown, add two or three tablespoons of molasses, a few cloves of chopped garlic, a half-cup of tomato paste with another cup of water and simmer for a bit. Add in some oregano and cumin to taste, and a bit of spice to the extent you can stand it (cayanne works well). Simmer it like a soup.

Pour in the TVP/TSP to absorb all of the liquid and stir it up.

You can use soy sauce instead of salt, or sub the spices for others. Caramelized onion is pretty important. If you don't like molasses, you can use a bit of sugar. Or you can use something like carrot juice instead of water.

PTree15's recipe might be better.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pirate Huntress View Post

well my sister came back for a while and made some vegan wings for us hehe.. she isn't even veg*n herself but she makes great veggie meat. then I made some vegan ranch & it was the bomb.
That sounds really good! Vegan ranch is amazing
 

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It makes me happy to hear you're already vegan at least one day a week. Doing a positive thing part of the time is better than never doing it at all. If you can do one, you can do two or three. I believe in your ability to do that.

Also, I might personally add I don't feel it's possible to ever be 100% vegan. At some point you're going to accidentally cause some sort of suffering in the world. It's inevitable. However, veganism doesn't have to be about an ever-expanding list of ingredients. My favorite article of all time on this subject is How Vegan by Matt Ball. While trying to avoid as many animal products as possible is truly admirable, by avoiding the obvious ones we prevent the overwhelming majority of the suffering, environmental destruction and other negative effects we'd otherwise be contributing to.
 
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