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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm currently enrolled in the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, in NYC, and a few weekends ago, they had a big conference, which I didn't go to, but Dr Joel Furhman spoke on his new book and the relationship of cancer to diet.<br><br>
a key point he says, "childhood diets are the major cause of adult cancers..... the majority of damage to the DNA in cells, occurs between the ages of 1-10"<br><br>
Just think what the SAD is going to yield in 20+ yrs.....<br><br>
I've listened to his lecture I think like 6 or more times, and I keep getting more out of it all the time.<br><br><br>
we should follow his GOMBS diet too.......Greens, onions, mushrooms, beans/berries, and seeds.<br><br>
He explains the importance of chopping onions first before cooking them, and how 10gms of mushrooms a day can decrease a woman's chance of breast cancer 64% (alone). He states every woman in America should know that but they don't....why? Pills make money. Anyway, 10gms of mushrooms is like one white button mushroom.<br><br>
Most veg people are still not eating enough greens, not just leaves, but green vegetables in general. They should be the staple of our diet....<br><br>
Definately think it is a book worth purchasing.....it's in my amazon cart, so I don't actually have it yet.<br><br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=veggieboards.com-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FSuper-Immunity-Essential-Nutrition-Boosting%2Fdp%2F0062080636%2Fref%3Dsr_1_1%3Fs%3Dbooks%26ie%3DUTF8%26qid%3D1322255592%26sr%3D1-1" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Super-Immunity...2255592&sr=1-1</a>
 

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Sounds interesting. I'm shocked that my library has it. I'm going to pick it up.
 

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Chopping onions? Really?<br><br>
Sounds like bunk science to me. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/blank.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":|">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Kibbleforlola</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3046114"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Chopping onions? Really?<br><br>
Sounds like bunk science to me. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/blank.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":|"></div>
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I've heard that before, so I googled it:<br><a href="http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=54" target="_blank">http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=54</a><br><br>
Do you know anything of Dr. Furhman? His Eat to Live is the vegan bible to me.
 

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I've been thinking about this stuff, too, lately. I'd been meaning to get more informed on the subject for awhile now, kept putting it off, but a flu I caught awhile back + some bad habits (not enough sleep, eating way too much junk food) ended up making me feel pretty awful, so I knew it was time to quit living that way and start taking better care of myself. I ordinarily feel great (vegan diets have a way of doing that for people), but I know enough about this stuff to know that you can look and feel fine while much damage is going on inside. Drinking a litre of pop and eating a whole batch of cookies a day, living on white flour products and fried foods? That's the sort of thing that will eventually take a toll on you, whether you can feel it happening or not.<br><br>
It's a common misconception, that all vegan diets are healthy (right alongside the opposite misconception, that they can't be healthy <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":rolleyes:">). This is definitely not the case.<br><br>
I like hearing what people like Joel Furhman, Neal Barnard, Mike Anderson, etc. have to say on this subject. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> I think we should always be skeptical, but not worry too much about the small inconsistencies or unverified details that might come up in their work or advice. The essential points they're making are the same, that we all need to get away from animal foods and refined / processed foods. We need to get over our addictions to salt, sugar, and fat. Our taste buds have been warped by the foods that have been pushed on us by giant corporations, so that what we want is calorie-dense, nutrient-void crap that's only going to make us sick in the long run. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("><br><br>
We need to start feeding ourselves <i>functionally</i>, not with the primary aim of satisfying manufactured cravings but with the goal of building healthy, strong bodies. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> And with the goal of changing our tastes so that we actually want what's good for us... To that end, here's a YouTube channel I had recommended to me in the past that I've been checking out again lately. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/aniphyo" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/user/aniphyo</a><br><br>
I don't intend to ever go completely raw myself (yet anyway <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p">), but I think a shift in that direction would be good for most of us, and wow, some of these look delicious, no?
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Kimberlily1983</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3046282"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I've been thinking about this stuff, too, lately. I'd been meaning to get more informed on the subject for awhile now, kept putting it off, but a flu I caught awhile back + some bad habits (not enough sleep, eating way too much junk food) ended up making me feel pretty awful, so I knew it was time to quit living that way and start taking better care of myself. I ordinarily feel great (vegan diets have a way of doing that for people), but I know enough about this stuff to know that you can look and feel fine while much damage is going on inside. Drinking a litre of pop and eating a whole batch of cookies a day, living on white flour products and fried foods? That's the sort of thing that will eventually take a toll on you, whether you can feel it happening or not.<br><br>
It's a common misconception, that all vegan diets are healthy (right alongside the opposite misconception, that they can't be healthy <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":rolleyes:">). This is definitely not the case.<br><br>
I like hearing what people like Joel Furhman, Neal Barnard, Mike Anderson, etc. have to say on this subject. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> I think we should always be skeptical, but not worry too much about the small inconsistencies or unverified details that might come up in their work or advice. The essential points they're making are the same, that we all need to get away from animal foods and refined / processed foods. We need to get over our addictions to salt, sugar, and fat. Our taste buds have been warped by the foods that have been pushed on us by giant corporations, so that what we want is calorie-dense, nutrient-void crap that's only going to make us sick in the long run. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("><br><br>
We need to start feeding ourselves <i>functionally</i>, not with the primary aim of satisfying manufactured cravings but with the goal of building healthy, strong bodies. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> And with the goal of changing our tastes so that we actually want what's good for us... To that end, here's a YouTube channel I had recommended to me in the past that I've been checking out again lately. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/aniphyo" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/user/aniphyo</a><br><br>
I don't intend to ever go completely raw myself (yet anyway <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p">), but I think a shift in that direction would be good for most of us, and wow, some of these look delicious, no?</div>
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My first instinct would be to agree with a lot of that, but I've heard so many contradictory claims about this, that and everything else being either good for you or bad for you that I can't treat health claims with anything other than skepticism anymore. Is fat really bad for you? Is sugar? Are processed foods? Is raw food actually healthier? I don't have a confident opinion on any of these things.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>cornsail</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3046293"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
My first instinct would be to agree with a lot of that, but I've heard so many contradictory claims about this, that and everything else being either good for you or bad for you that I can't treat health claims with anything other than skepticism anymore. Is fat really bad for you? Is sugar? Are processed foods? Is raw food actually healthier? I don't have a confident opinion on any of these things.</div>
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So how do you eat? What criteria do you try to satisfy when planning out your meals?<br><br>
I hear you on feeling frustrated by all the contradictory information that's out there. Myself, if the source seems to be in any way associated with the meat or sugar industry, I dismiss it. Like anti-soy propaganda, for instance. As for the different guidelines proposed by, say, the Vegan Society, PCRM, Eat to Live, the RAVE diet, raw foodism, etc. I figure taking bits and pieces from all of them is probably best. Explore the options and see what seems to make us feel best. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
And I don't have any sources for you right now, but it's quite well-documented that too much fat and sugar is not good for us. Some things offer more to us nutritionally if cooked than raw, but most things are better raw. That said, sometimes it's better to consume them cooked if you're going to end up getting more of it (much easier to consume lots of cooked spinach for instance, vs. the same amount of spinach if it were raw: it shrinks a lot when cooked). I say we'd benefit from more raw foods because most of us eat dismal amounts; not saying I'm convinced yet that what's best for us is a diet that consists of 100% raw foods only.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
he's directly involved in the cancer/nutrition research. It's amazing....if i listen again and try to take notes, I'll try to write it all down. There are chemical reactions in the onions that need to be activated by the crushing/cutting prior to heating or cooking, and in which are not deactivated when cooked. He explains it very well. I really wish I could share the lecture with you, but it's part of IIN's property. I've been doing a lot of nutrition and cancer research with my sister's cancer diagnosis, and she should be getting this book next week.<br><br>
read through the reviews and comments left on Amazon....Furhman is totally reliable too!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Kimberlily1983</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3046303"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
So how do you eat? What criteria do you try to satisfy when planning out your meals?</div>
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Nutrition-wise I try to get in some protein and some of the basic nutrients like vitamins A through D, calcium and iron. And I try not to eat too many calories per day. Other than that and ethics, I just go by taste and convenience.<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">I hear you on feeling frustrated by all the contradictory information that's out there. Myself, if the source seems to be in any way associated with the meat or sugar industry, I dismiss it. Like anti-soy propaganda, for instance.</div>
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But there is a lot of bogus information in the alternative/natural health communities too. Some from con-men like Kevin Trudeau, and some from people who sincerely believe in their ideas.<br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">As for the different guidelines proposed by, say, the Vegan Society, PCRM, Eat to Live, the RAVE diet, raw foodism, etc. I figure taking bits and pieces from all of them is probably best. Explore the options and see what seems to make us feel best. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
And I don't have any sources for you right now, but it's quite well-documented that too much fat and sugar is not good for us. Some things offer more to us nutritionally if cooked than raw, but most things are better raw. That said, sometimes it's better to consume them cooked if you're going to end up getting more of it (much easier to consume lots of cooked spinach for instance, vs. the same amount of spinach if it were raw: it shrinks a lot when cooked). I say we'd benefit from more raw foods because most of us eat dismal amounts; not saying I'm convinced yet that what's best for us is a diet that consists of 100% raw foods only.</div>
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As far as I've looked into it I'd say that sounds right. I'm sure vegan raw is healthy. Not necessarily healthier than a nutrient rich non-raw diet, but who knows. I do think there is a tendency for a lot of people to overdo their nutrient consumption, though. The antioxidant craze is a good example. People didn't seem to realize that just because they're good for you doesn't mean "the more the better". Or that they were already getting plenty of antioxidants in their coffee, tea, oranges, apples, blueberries, etc, while they're spending money on expensive acai and goji products.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Furhman believes half of your veggies should be raw and cooked. And to eat a lot of green veggies. He compares the gorillas and their diets to what we should be eating more of. He eats very simply himself, eating stir fries as an example. He doesn't believe in eating much whole grain breads, cereals or pasta- still processed foods....it just goes back to eating the whole food as naturally as possible. he doesn't say anything about whole grain rices or quinoa, but they would be good too. ( I LOVE Lundberg mixed wild rice blends!)<br><br>
It's sad that 62% of typical american diet calories comes from processed foods....then breaks it down to only 5% is actually non white potato vegetables! THAT is sad news!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>cornsail</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3046333"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
What's wrong with processed foods?</div>
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You lose nutritional integrity<br>
Furhman really goes after the need for micronutrients. The vitamins and minerals contained in whole, unprocessed, preferably organically grown fruits and veggies.<br><br>
Check out Dr. Furhman on your PBS listing. I just watched his Three Steps to Incrediable Health lecture this morning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have VB open on another tab, just wanted you to know that I am working on typing out the key points from his lecture. There's a lot to it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Cornsail: there's very little nutrient value in processed foods, from breads, cereals, pastas, yogurts, canned soups, salad dressings, chips, breakfast bars, sodas, and most other things packaged.<br><br>
62%of calories in Americans come from processed foods which are void of phytochemicals, nutrients, and antioxidents. Then 27% of calories comes from animal products, which also don't contain any significant amt of micronutrients, phytochemicals, or antioxidents either. the other 10% is vegetales, which half of is white potatoes (french fries), so only 5% of food contains any phytochemicals. This allows the immune system to be weakened to bacterias, viruses, and cancer cells. Again, he goes into great depth with this.....<br><br>
He says even if you've eaten well for half of your life, there's a good chance you'll prevent heart attacks and strokes, but cancer is different. We should be able to live to 95-105 easily.<br><br>
Methylation to DNA (damage to the DNA in the cells) occurs between the ages of 1-10, which is what sets the stage for cancer later on. He states that a diet of moderate changes will prevent the heart attacks, but it takes more work to prevent cancer, but it's not significant to prevent cancer in the diet. You have to repair the gentic structures from when you were a child. "Childhood diets are the major cause of adult cancers" so now as adults we have to overcompensate to maximumly take in nutrients to repair the methylation that occured in childhood.<br><br>
Individual vitamins do not take care of the problem, it has to come from whole food so there is interaction with all of the other micronutrients. Every piece of broccoli has over 1000 microntrients, and every strawberry has over 700! Cancer numbers are still increasing every year since the 30s. Antibiotics (our own and in animal products) increase the risk of cancer too- women who have taken 25 antibiotic prescriptions over 17 yrs had double the risk of breast cancer. women who took 5-10 over 17 yrs had a 1.5 x higher risk of cancer.....other drugs/hormones/chemotheraputic drugs also increase cancer risks.<br><br>
Eating more vegetables fixes the DNA....methylation can be measured in DNA, and a person who smokes and eats poorly can be shown how damaged their DNA is, and then be shown how the body can repair itself with the addition of an excellent diet. Adding more green vegetables, reduces free radicals, and methylation, and less AGEs. Green cruciferousveggies produce ITCs, that can arm the body to reduce the early life damage. Breast cancer risk can be reduced, and even colon cancer predisposition goes down significantly when you eat a high intake of green vegetable. Dr furhman recommends double what the study recommendations are to prevent cancer. A diet high in greens has also been shown in medical literature to reverse cervical dysplasia, HPV, prevent HIV replication, and inhibit the infection of hepatitis.<br><br>
The ARE- antioxidant response element; is always workin in our bodies and we have the ability to fight free radicals and are cancer proof, but if you're not eating green vegetables, you're not activiting your own bodies ability to fight disease. (then there's more biochemical stuff I don't understand in this part of the lecture)<br><br>
Basically chewing breaks open the cell wall and lets Myrosinase out to combine with glycosinolates (compounds that contain sulfer and nitrogen in cruciferous veggies , and the compounds are formed while chewing. There's even bacteria in the mouth that also combine with the green vegetables, making compounds that are disease preventive. taking kale or bok choy, and cooking it first then blending destroys the myrosinase in the food, from the heat decreasing ITC activity, but blending it when raw and mix with some onion releasing allinase to be released to create sulfuric acid...those are the anticancer compounds- the compounds are not heat sensitive, but the enzymes are. blend them first before adding to the dish to be cooked.<br><br>
Lutene gives vegetables their green color, lycopene gives red color, beta carotene gives orange color to foods.<br><br>
nutritarian people care about the quality of nutrients in their diet, not just the calories.<br><br>
Mushrooms are an integral part of our diet. They don't have a lot of micronutrients. But they have a lot nutrients which have anti cancer properties. they have the ability to find damaged cells, and lable it so the immune system can identify and deal with it. they have aromatase activity, which keeps the levels of estradiol down to limit the cancer affecting the breast. " Eating mushrooms every day reduces a woman's risk of breast cancer by 64%". 10gms of mushrooms- one button mushroom a day... if they eat mushrooms, drink green tea and ate green vegetables, they have an 89% risk reduction for cancer. Mushrooms also inhibit blood vessels growth (angiogenesis), into cancer tissue and fat tissue. Cancers can't grow or spread unless they have new blood vessels to feed it. Fat cells are like cancer. Fat is a hormone producing factory for fat. Consuming junk food, sugar and fat releases insulin, which promotes angiogenesis. so the mushrooms prevent cancer from being fueled. Mushrooms, onions, cinnamon, garlic, soy, berries and green vegetables are all angiogenesis inhibitors. the highest consumers of onions have a 55-88% reduction of different cancers...it's about a half cup of onions.<br><br>
GOMBS Greens, onion, Mushrooms, beans/berries, seeds.......to prevent cancers, these foods need to be eaten regularly. They've even found out that increased access to medical care increases cancer risks, because the person is exposed to more cancer causing drugs. People need to grow their own food.....beans and onions in 71 countries linked to decreased cancer risks, even in poorer countries where they have access to these foods, and even greens. cooked tomatoes increase lycopene availablity. Decreased calorie consumption leads to longer life. Increased caloric consumption is related to increased IGF-1, esp when animal protein is consumed, and this is related to increased cancer, dementia, and increased free radicals floating throughout the body.<br><br>
He even calls McDonald's "Mc Cancer" lol! SAD eaters are consuming 30% calories from animal products. IGF -1 levels aren't reduced in people until their animal consumption gets to 10% or lower. You have to REDUCE animal products in order to NOT get cancer! (this means vegetarians still consuming dairy and egg products!!!!)<br><br>
Eating huge amt's of animal protiens, and adding muscle/physical mass in the gym can lead to cancer, because of increased systemic IGF-1 being pumped throughout the body. local IGF-1 produced during exercise does not have the same effect- it's the animal proteins and systemic amts of IGF.<br><br>
green vegetables, plus tomatoes, eggplant, onions, mushrooms, peppers are all nonstarchy low calorie vegetables, increases the anticancer effects of your diet..eaty statchy vegetables in smaller quantities. when you eat properly, you can slow down your metabolic rate. You live longer with a slower metabolic rate. Eat less food, and not get too thin...."Every thing you know about nutrition is WRONG!" when you eat right, your metabolic rate slows down,and you live longer. When you eat wrong, and you're eating every hour or two because you feel like crap, is because your body is always detoxifying, the minute your body stops metabolising. By eating every few hours you're speeding up metabolism, aging your body faster, causing your risk of cancer to rise.<br><br>
Eat more foods with a high micronutrient and higher nutrient density foods....more healthy foods, and less unhealthy foods. Vegetables green and nonstarchy foods at the bottom, then starchy foods above that.<br><br>
A lot of his patients have reversed their advanced cancer through this type of diet and be totally rid of and cured. the earlier the cancer is caught and the diet is changed, the better chance they have to win the battle.<br><br>
He goes on again to discuss how this type of diet will increase people's immune systems preventing viral and bacterial infections along with the cancer......<br><br>
The whole thing was fantastic! this is a very close lecture to what he talked about, and is on youtube....it's 58 minutes long...<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qReC7tjCakY&feature=related" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qReC7...eature=related</a>
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>silva</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
You lose nutritional integrity<br>
Furhman really goes after the need for micronutrients. The vitamins and minerals contained in whole, unprocessed, preferably organically grown fruits and veggies.</div>
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Can you explain what you mean by "lose nutritional integrity"?<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Photojess</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3046789"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Cornsail: there's very little nutrient value in processed foods, from breads, cereals, pastas, yogurts, canned soups, salad dressings, chips, breakfast bars, sodas, and most other things packaged.</div>
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I will definitely agree with you that there is little nutrient value in <i>some</i> processed foods. But I would also say there is little nutrient value in some unprocessed foods and that there is high nutrient value in some processed foods.<br><br>
For example, take a serving of <a href="http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/breakfast-cereals/1687/2" target="_blank">total raisin bran</a>. <a href="http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/soups-sauces-and-gravies/1026/2" target="_blank">Canned soup</a>, (or canned beans/vegetables in general) it would seem, can also be a good source of nutrients. Also frozen fruits and vegetables (if you consider those processed) are just as high in nutrients AFAIK. <a href="http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/baked-products/4876/2" target="_blank">Whole wheat bread</a> is a decent source of protein and fiber. Moreso than <a href="http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5718/2" target="_blank">white rice</a>, which is unprocessed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
frozen fruits don't have anything done to them but frozen...not even sure if they're washed actually. They don't stick together as if they had been wet. You're missing his point....a processed cereal with added vitamins and minerals has nothing against steel cut or rolled oats with fresh/frozen fruit. that cereal is nutritionally dead, it's got more than 5 ingredients, and has vitamins and minerals added to it....have a green smoothie and reap the benefits of the antioxidents, phytochemicals, and micronutrients from the greens and fruit.<br><br>
canned soup, that's been processed in a factory can't compare to a soup made at home with fresh vegetables, made without msg, preservatives, oils, and BPA in the cans,<br><br>
He's trying to recommend the OPTIMAL diet to prevent infections and reduce cancer risks...it will also alleviate heart attack and stroke risks too.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Photojess</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3046833"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
frozen fruits don't have anything done to them but frozen...not even sure if they're washed actually. They don't stick together as if they had been wet. You're missing his point....a processed cereal with added vitamins and minerals has nothing against steel cut or rolled oats with fresh/frozen fruit. that cereal is nutritionally dead, it's got more than 5 ingredients, and has vitamins and minerals added to it....have a green smoothie and reap the benefits of the antioxidents, phytochemicals, and micronutrients from the greens and fruit.<br><br>
canned soup, that's been processed in a factory can't compare to a soup made at home with fresh vegetables, made without msg, preservatives, oils, and BPA in the cans,<br><br>
He's trying to recommend the OPTIMAL diet to prevent infections and reduce cancer risks...it will also alleviate heart attack and stroke risks too.</div>
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How do you know the cereal is nutritionally dead or that canned soup can't compare to fresh soup? I'm not saying you're necessarily wrong, but it seems like a very bold claim in that it would render nutrition labels meaningless with regard to micronutrients. Because it's a bold claim I have to wonder what evidence it's based on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
it is a bold claim....like he said....everything we know about nutrition is wrong! (with his emphasis). He's just supporting the claim that we all do not get enough greens and green vegetables in our diet, and that we should be eating at least a pound a day of just green vegetables, in addition to whatever else we eat...<br><br>
It's the crowding out concept too...fill your body with what it needs to be fed, and there will be little room for garbage or nutritionally devoid foods. Is it going to hurt if you occasionally have something like that? No, but the idea is to always feed your body what it needs to function at the top of it's game, and it in turn will keep you pretty much disease free. Our bodies were meant to be disease free...not riddled with high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes and cancer. Those are all self induced diseases.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>cornsail</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3046815"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I will definitely agree with you that there is little nutrient value in <i>some</i> processed foods. But I would also say there is little nutrient value in some unprocessed foods and that there is high nutrient value in some processed foods.</div>
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