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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone, I just started here and I need some insight on something. I just graduated from college and attempting to start a career and I just applied to the Philadelphia Police Department. I am a little concerned that if I go to the academy I won't be able to get the nutrients that I need. Does anyone know if the academy or other academies give special food requests prior to entrance?
 

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They are required to, but don't expect it to be good by comparison. You're not gonna starve though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's what I kinda figured. I mean they have to have special consideration for people who follow a specific religion (Hindu etc). Thanks nomad888!
 

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Veggie security guard here.<br><br>
Everybody else at work takes drugs for blood pressure, diabetes, and cholesterol. Meanwhile I'm in my fifties but have the stats of an especially healthy eighteen year old.<br><br>
Good luck and hang in there!
 

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You can phone the academy directly and ask. Are you asking about the cafeteria in general or are you required to live on-site in barracks housing?<br><br>
Where I am from (Canada) there is a large East Indian population and lots of new academy students were vegetarian (mostly Hindu), there was plenty of vegetarian options but have to admit, it's not great for BARRACKS HOUSING (the omni foods suck too). The cafeteria in general (ie. for academy staff, visiting guests, which students could also visit) had a much better selection. Philly should be large enough to be accommodating but again, feel free to just call and ask, it's perfectly fine to do so! Many places here (not sure about the US) consider vegetarianism as part of accommodating religion and ensure the options are available.<br><br>
Good luck! The only hard part I found was staying vegan on overnight shifts, LOL, only McD's was open.
 

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Over time, I've become a bit skeptical about the abilities of veggie police officers, especially given how in a recent jewel heist, the bad guys could easily escape since a broccoli couldn't, due to its size, even reach the steering wheel of the police car to pursue them.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Sevenseas</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3082271"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Over time, I've become a bit skeptical about the abilities of veggie police officers, especially given how in a recent jewel heist, the bad guys could easily escape since a broccoli couldn't, due to its size, even reach the steering wheel of the police car to pursue them.</div>
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Lol!<br>
Another veg police officer here. I'm in oz, and our academy food sucked in general...veg or not. I lived from the salad bar, and had stocks of nuts/dried fruit etc in our communal kitchenette. I also went out for dinner a few nights per week for 'real food'.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Sevenseas</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3082271"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Over time, I've become a bit skeptical about the abilities of veggie police officers, especially given how in a recent jewel heist, the bad guys could easily escape since a broccoli couldn't, due to its size, even reach the steering wheel of the police car to pursue them.</div>
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nice one sevenseas! roflmao
 

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Retired police here. I wasn't veggie during the 30 years of my military and police career. Well, actually, I was going more and more veggie my last few years. It was a pretty awful time of it. The last seven years were just brutal. I wont go into great detail but, I was supervising detectives including a callout team for everything from homicide to rape and robbery. I was also a peer councilor for officers in crisis and a supervisor for fraud and computer crimes investigations. I also investigated criminal internal cases. Needless to say it sucked. My point here is that police work can be a super charged pressure cooker that wont let up even for a day. That makes it real easy to stop caring about your self discipline for your eating habits. You can just run right out of emotional and physical energy.<br><br>
Rookie school will be as easy as it ever gets. Sure, it's physically demanding but, they tell you what to do and what to wear. That's pretty simple. It's after you graduate and finish field training that it can get tough. You will have to make split second decisions that will get micro managed for months and years after that. You will work with good, honorable and competent officers and a few hooligans who slipped through the cracks and need to be fired. As you become a veteran the responsibilities will be piled on with no end in sight till the day you retire. If you spend your career in the trenches like I did then you will get death threats even after you retire. You will make decisions far above your pay grade. In 30 years you will get into a bunch of fights, get shot at, drive fast cars pursuing very dangerous people, or deciding not to chase because it's too dangerous to the public. You will be supervised by incompetent bosses. You will work with some of the most competent, compassionate and generous people you will ever meet. You will have to make ethical decisions that will cost you in your career. Doing the right thing is often expensive. But, do it honorably and there is no better service to the community. As a police officer you can help people in ways that no one else can.<br><br>
Above all, never tarnish that badge. If you do you hurt every officer in the country. If you are faced with a situation where you're going to have to take some lumps, take them up front. Tell the truth always. Require the officers around you to always tell the truth. Your reputation is all you have in police work. Defend it with good reporting, emotional distance, honesty and personal integrity. No arrest, and I mean no arrest is ever worth compromising your integrity. Once a thing is done it cannot be undone. Once a thing has been seen it cannot be unseen. Work to make your agency the very best it can be.<br><br>
lastly, and less important, when you get on the job, start looking and thinking about what you're career goals will be. Then start working towards that early. You will get there. I chose detective work and I loved it. Some people wanted to obtain rank. That never appealed to me. I'm an "in the trenches" kinda guy. I wanted to be in the thick of it what ever it was. In a big agency, by the time you reach sergeant your kinda removed from real police work. The higher you go the more of a paper pusher you become just flying a desk. I really enjoyed investigating, going out to the crime scenes for the "who dun-it's". I loved the process of going from a crime scene, interviewing witnesses and suspects and eventually closing the case with an arrest. It's a good feeling when you can get some justice for a victim. I personally have been on more death investigation scenes than I can remember or count. Some are heartbreaking. But, death isn't the worst thing that can happen to you.<br><br>
But, train your mind so that when your confronted with extreme violence targeted at you personally you can respond effectively and instantly. As much as people don't like to look at it, the reality is that there are times when you may need to use force. They wont be paying you to lose. I have seen officers killed in the line of duty because when that day came they weren't mentally prepared. If this isn't something you can do, do yourself, your spouse and your children a favor - choose another career. Right now, in every major city, there are people scheming to kill a police officer. Right now, as you read this, some officer is fighting for their life.<br><br>
Uniform, patrol division, police work can be nasty dirty. I have seen trainee officers quit after taking a piss soaked drunk to the jail to sleep it off. I have been covered in other peoples blood. I've been in many, many fights and been injured. Nobody will care when you get injured. They will only care when the person you arrest gets injured. Can you defend yourself within the reality that you might get slammed in the media? If not find another career, you're gonna get hurt. Can you put on some latex gloves and put a stinker dead body in a body bag? You will learn to deal with that but, as a rookie you will likely get stuck with that job at least once. The smell is worse than the visual. Can you be a team player? Your life will depend on your fellow officers as theirs will depend on you. If you have some ideas that you can't risk your life for your fellow officer pick another career. The way we go home at night is by looking out for each other. God knows no one else will. The general public will stand there and watch as you take an ass kicking. Your fellow officers will risk life and limb to bail you out. You will learn to love the approach of blue lights, sirens, engines wide open and screeching tires.<br><br>
Eat right (which was the topic of this post) and exercise. They are exercising in prison to take you on when they get out. If I were to go back in time as a vegetarian in rookie school I would make sure to get plenty of starches in my diet for energy. By the way, the people you go through rookie school will become your close friends for the rest of your career. No matter who gets promoted to what you will always be friends. It's friendships you will cherish as you get older. When youre all rookies you will all have a good time when you hit the streets because it's all new and exciting. Ignorance is bliss, enjoy it.<br><br>
There will be times when you will have the opportunity to do something wrong, no one will be around, and you may think it doesn't matter. Listen, it matters. I can't stress it enough. Never, ever, compromise your personal ethical standards. Hold yourself to the highest standards. Trust me, over time, everyone will know who the honorable officers are and who the people who need to be fired are. It all hinges on you holding yourself to higher standards than the community lives by. Make sure that you understand what you're signing up for. You're signing up for not having fun at times. Your neighbors will be watching you to see how you conduct yourself. They will hold you to higher standards than everyone else. You can't just be a cop when you're on duty. If you do a whole career it will change you and you will never get back to the carefree person you once were.<br><br>
Anyway, I hope the best for you. I will never regret my police career even though there were times when it was incredibly hard and stressful. The patrol function is where you will likely start. That is a good job. After 30 years I found that patrol is as good as it ever gets. You wont believe that after a few years in a marked unit but, after about 25 years you will look back and discover that it's a darn good job.<br><br>
I'm just a little envious and excited for you.<br><br>
lastly, there is no perfect. The grass isn't greener on the other side of the fence. When I was in the military I thought that life would be better when I got back to the world. Sure, there are situations that suck and situations that have drastically less suck. But, most of that is in your perspective of reality. The truth is, it's really never any better or worse. It just is. You want to be happy? Learn to discipline your mind and you will find levels of happy you don't even have the experience to imagine right now. There is no freedom without discipline. Without discipline we drive ourselves into bondage that we can't escape from, which includes things like guilt and regret. Read a book by Shunryu Suzuki called "Zen Mind Beginners Mind". It will do more for you than anything else I can think of.<br><br>
Never be the sheep. Always be the wolf. When attacked never think about defending yourself. In this way you are programing your mind to lose. If you fight fair you lose. Bullets always get the right of way. With the exception of 2011, more officers are killed in car crashes than by bullets. This last year it was bullets for the first time in many many years in the the USA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
FalconBrother I cannot begin to thank you enough. Yeah this thread was about being a vegetarian police officer but I think you enlightened me to the challenges and enjoyment of being a police officer. I think the reason I want to do this is because I want the challenge, not many people are willing the take that level of challenge in their life and are content with what they already have. The truth is that someone has to be patrolling the streets protecting the meek and innocent from the hate filled people in the world. I want to be a police officer, plain and simple.
 

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Quite a long read there <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> But yeah, it hits home. I'm no police officer but as a soldier much of what you said is very similar.<br><br>
Rich1288, when you talk of "patrolling the streets and protecting the meek and innocent from the hate filled people of the world," it might sound cliche to some, maybe even something out of a fiction book (many people will simply see you as a pig who lives to eat doughnuts and hand out tickets), but I have a real life example of the reality of this type of work I'd like to share.<br><br>
After spending a while on active duty, I eventually ended up in the Army National Guard. Ian Deutch, a friend of mine in my unit back in Las Vegas was a police officer for his civilian job, if you want to call it that lol. After a deployment to Afghanistan, in which he encountered and obviously survived multiple enemy encounters, he finally got back home and was given a short vacation before having to return to the police force. On his second day back on duty, he was shot and killed by some dumbass who I guess just couldn't let his ex girlfriend be. She made a call to 911 saying he was chasing her with an assault rifle, my friend got the call and intercepted and confronted him in the parking lot of a casino. Ian was killed, the gunman was shot and killed in return by a fellow deputy, the girl was protected and no longer has to worry about that crazy *******, and Ian's wife, daughter, and parents are probably the ones who pay the price the longest, having to spend the rest of their lives without him.<br><br>
Stories are one thing, but like Falcon said, you will experience things like this. I mean not everyone goes bat**** crazy, but we all end up with baggage that sticks with us forever. You will lose people you care about in horrible ways, and you will pay a hefty price yourself in one way or another. It's up to you to make sure that price was worth it.<br><br>
I invite you to read about Ian, imagine that you know him personally, and realize that if you choose this path, this reality will assuredly be played out in your life at some point. Keep this in mind not only as you decide your own path, but if you end up deciding to raise a family. The sacrifices you make, they will make with you.<br><br><a href="http://www.odmp.org/officer/20382-deputy-sheriff-ian-michael-deutch" target="_blank">http://www.odmp.org/officer/20382-de...michael-deutch</a><br><br><a href="http://www.lvrj.com/news/deputy-killed-in-pahrump-casino-shootout-identified-92208944.html" target="_blank">http://www.lvrj.com/news/deputy-kill...-92208944.html</a><br><br><a href="http:" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oE4toul_45c</a><br><br><a href="http:" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w3mKd8tVLAU&feature=results_video&playnext =1&list=PL1E76051D6143F05D</a>
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I didn't want to make it sound as cliche as it came out to be haha. As far as the price that someone pays I think is subjective based on the individual. We all give something up of ourselves when we commit to an organization that brings out the best and worst of each person. And I don't want to down talk the military, I have many friends who are currently serving in Afghanistan and I cannot even possibly imagine the sacrifices they make not only for the country but within themselves. But I believe that as a police officer that you have to be willing to change, to mold yourself into something that you are not entirely comfortable with. I personally have no idea what that is, given that I am not an officer, yet anyway, but I am sure that eventually I will find out.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Rich1288</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3085904"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
But I believe that as a police officer that you have to be willing to change, to mold yourself into something that you are not entirely comfortable with.</div>
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Actually I think that's a pretty accurate way to put it. I wish you the best of luck. I considered becoming a police officer as I leave the military but I don't think I have it in me. I'm barely past 30 and I already feel like a tired old man sometimes lol. I want my vacation now, so to speak <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>nomad888</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3086020"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Actually I think that's a pretty accurate way to put it. I wish you the best of luck. I considered becoming a police officer as I leave the military but I don't think I have it in me. I'm barely past 30 and I already feel like a tired old man sometimes lol. I want my vacation now, so to speak <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"></div>
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I certainly understand the need for a vacation. We had officers who were guard and reserves. They went from there police job to Iraq and Afghanistan and then back on the job. As I peer councilor I spent time with some of these folks. They told me about some really tough stuff. Early on we decided that we, as police, were unprepared to help these guys. The DOD stepped in with services and experts familiar with helping folks returning from war. I was impressed with what I observed.<br><br>
I want to say to you that the way you feel is temporary. I have been beyond emotionally exhausted. I have been paranoid and depressed. But, if you take some time to play you will wake up one day and things will be much better. Sure, there are times when something completely unrelated will happen and I'll go straight back to an unhappy place but, I can bounce back real quick. There was a time when I couldn't get back. The measuring stick in psychology is: What impact is the thoughts and stress having on your ability life conduct your life? Those of us who have experienced PSTD know that you never forget. But, you can learn to put things in perspective and move forward with a happy life. There is a place where you will stop thinking about it every day and get to something more of a "Sh!t Happens" kinda attitude.<br><br>
Everyone has "intrusive thoughts". But, we all need to be in a place where they don't control our decision making. Where we realize that they are fabricated and where we don't give them any real energy. My personal method is to realize that they are my mind's coping mechanism and then I thumb my nose at them and walk on. I refuse to give them any real play.<br><br>
I don't think humans are really wired to live with extreme violence. When we experience it we are left with a recovery time. The lowest level is probably something like the movie "SAW". The middle is probably viewing real violence playing out in our presence and the aftermath of violence (blood, death, etc..). Lastly is being directly involved in violence. I have found that for a lot of folks this can be hairy with a million wrinkles. But, the potential to learn to compartmentalize it and live with it is huge. Of course, if we don't deal with it we must deal with neurosis or even psychosis.<br><br>
For police it can be a challenge as they will likely see and be involved in more violence before retirement. Our purpose was officer retention. That is trying to help people stay mentally and emotionally healthy so, they don't quit or worse. But, the skills are universal.<br><br>
Nomad888, let me say thank you for your service.
 

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Wow Veggie police officer...first time in my ears. Please tell me if there's any connection between police officer and <a href="http://www.berrihill.com/" target="_blank">private detective agency</a>? It could be possible to resolve any cases if these two forces combine together as a team? those who know the answer throw me now. Any way I'm Harley
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Rich1288</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3085638"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
FalconBrother I cannot begin to thank you enough. Yeah this thread was about being a vegetarian police officer but I think you enlightened me to the challenges and enjoyment of being a police officer. I think the reason I want to do this is because I want the challenge, not many people are willing the take that level of challenge in their life and are content with what they already have. The truth is that someone has to be patrolling the streets protecting the meek and innocent from the hate filled people in the world. I want to be a police officer, plain and simple.</div>
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I found that as a vegeterian peace officer I was able to run faster, farther, and had more endurance than the "omnivore" officers.<br><br>
I stayed healthier through my career and as I approached the retirement zone where most would take desk jobs or easier duties I stayed active and kept up with the younger ones.<br><br>
Allen
 
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