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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there folks,<br><br>
My fiance and I moved onto a sailboat in Wisconsin about 2 months ago are sailing through the Mississippi river (and others) to the Gulf of Mexico and wherever the wind takes us after that. My fiance has been vegetarian for about 6 years and after we started dating and living together 3+ years ago, I shifted from occasional meat eater to de-facto vegetarian with occasional breaks when visiting my parents' or friends' organic farms. Since moving onto the boat, we have had to become very intentional about all of our food purchasing and meal planning decisions. Storage is at a major premium in our 28 foot boat and our only refrigeration is a picnic cooler, kept cold with blocks of ice that we have to replace every 4 days.<br><br>
We are both very flexible eaters and never feel particularly inconvenienced by our decisions, while at home or traveling, but we are also both pseudo-foodies and making exciting meals in the boat's tiny galley and with the lack of refrigeration (or running water) is a big challenge - but often a fun one. The whole experience is definitely shifting our meal planning dramatically - not only on the ingredient end - but also because the whole idea of "leftovers" gets turned on it's head when you can't keep extra food cold for one day - or three.<br><br>
Last night we made a Ugandan Pilau and Curry in the middle of an intense rain and wind storm that was kicking the boat all over the place. The food was great and the leftovers were still fine today - even though they were just on the "kitchen counter" all night<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
We're lucky right now, in that we are still in the upper Midwest, where co-ops and Whole Foods markets are abundant. Once we leave Chicago, through the Illinois waterway, we're expecting that our options for the more "natural" fare will dwindle dramatically. That is in one week (we're in Milwaukee now) and we planning on doing a major provisioning in Chicago right before we head out. We'd love to hear any ideas that anyone has for good, sailboat-y recipes or just foodstuffs to stock up on before heading down the river. Remember, both refrigeration and space are at a premium<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> Also, for reference, we do not eat seafood, but do eat dairy... I know! No-seafood sailors circling the globe in sailboat, crazy 8) What is that? lacto-ovo-vegetarian or something along those lines? anyway...<br><br>
Thanks and look forward to your ideas and comments!<br>
Jaxon<br><br>
Also, my fiance and I are photojournalists and are our posting photos, writings, recipes, etc at <a href="http://mangolandia.com" target="_blank">http://mangolandia.com</a> Please feel free to come take a look, read, comment or critique.<br><br><img alt="" src="http://mangolandia.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/shower-day6.jpg" style="border:0px solid;">
 

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Cool! I've always wanted to do something like that.<br><br>
I would think that veg*n food would be better anyway, as meat spoils and all that.<br><br>
We might be able to help with meal ideas if we know what kind of kitchen supplies you have. Stove? Camp stove? Heating appliance of some sort? I'd assume that a sailboat would be too small for an oven, right?<br><br>
When will you be hitting the southern U.S.? If you hit the South during growing season, fresh produce will be abundant, obviously.
 

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I just wanted to say that Mochila is adorable. I didn't know you could have pet hedgehogs, I've never seen that before. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
kibble, thanks a lot for the response. Totally right about the meat spoiling scenario. I'm sure this would be a lot harder if we were trying to store meat - especially if we were attached to eating meat once or twice a day. In the end, tofu and any kind of meat "substitutes" that we splurge on every so often don't keep well either, but at least the ramifications of them going a bit bad is not as intense as spoiled beef or something<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"><br>
About the kitchen supplies - good question. Probably should have mentioned that before<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> Even though we were in a big rush to get moved in and headed south before things got to cold up here in the Midwest, we still invested quite a bit of research, time and money in at least having a good stove aboard. It's actually a really cool little unit made by a Swedish company called Origo. They've been around for 20+ years and are very popular with liveaboard cruisers because they used non-pressurized alcohol as a fuel (think moonshine) - by far the safest option for having a fire in a small floating bucket - aka a boat. No potential explosions, leaks, flare-ups, etc. and the fumes are lighter than air - not the case with propane. Either way, we hunted across all Craigslists in the country to find a used one of their oven+2 burner models and ended up getting one for 1/4 of the $2000 retail price. So long story short, yes we DO have an oven now.. Pretty deluxe actually<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"><br>
There are a number of photos and more info on this post: <a href="http://mangolandia.com/2011/08/23/origo-stove-aboard/" target="_blank">http://mangolandia.com/2011/08/23/origo-stove-aboard/</a><br>
As far as other supplies go, we don't have much of anything with a motor (mixer, blender, etc.), but other than that have a good selection of the basic pots, cast iron pans, french presses and everything in between. We also have a TON of dry bulk stuff - beans, rice, chickpeas, steel cut oats (which neither of us like anymore), flour, sugar, etc. etc. We have not had great luck keeping veggies fresh onboard. Onions and garlic last okay. Carrots and potatoes too. Anything green, we end up eating constantly for 48 hours, so it doesn't spoil. Even though I grew up with a lot of "cold storage"/root cellars on the farm - we still haven't figured out how to pull it off here. Not enough airflow in the space we're using I think..<br>
Hopefully that's enough info to get the gears turning<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> Thanks a lot for taking the time!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Jessica, thanks a lot! Mochila is most definitely adorable. We did not know pet hedgehogs existed until about 2 years ago either. I really loved the IDEA of the animals because I grew up reading the Redwall series and hedgehogs play a great role throughout the books. Then a year ago, Caye was browsing the pets section of Craigslist as a homework break and ran into a hedgehog breeder about an hour away from our apartment. We did 3 day's intensive research, then went and picked up baby Mochila.<br>
Although she is super cute, we have had a lot of mixed feelings about owning an animal that needs to be caged and is nocturnal. It really makes the relationship pretty one-way. No jumping and licking when you return from the store. No purring and rubbing against legs. Just a lot of sleeping really. Who knows...? We have been and continue to be quite conflicted about the whole thing... but we do our best to cuddle with her often and make her life as interesting as possible<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>jaxonk</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3001552"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
In the end, tofu and any kind of meat "substitutes" that we splurge on every so often don't keep well either!</div>
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There is a type of tofu that comes in a little carton like a juice box that doesn't need to be refrigerated. The brand is MORI-NU, and at places like Whole Foods it's usually with the Japanese foods. It's pretty cheap (<$2/carton), and stays good in the pantry for a couple of months. My husband and I like to make scrambled tofu with it by mashing it up with some nutritional yeast, salt and pepper, and hot sauce, and we eat it on toast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Great tip Jennyface! We actually just ran into that in a wholefoods the other day, but didn't pick any up. I wonder how long the shelf-life is.. Maybe we could stock up with a few months worth like the super homogenized(?) milk we got. I love the scramble idea. We eat a ton of nutritional yeast around here and that could be great. Thanks!<br>
That reminds me, that I wanted to mention our current dinner of choice on here - popcorn. Seriously though. We're not particularly light eaters, but one killer batch of popcorn makes a perfect movie and dinner night for us.<br><br>
Our perfect batch of popcorn is:<br>
- 1-1.5 cups of popcorn<br>
- 2+1 tablespoons olive oil<br>
- a 2" inch cube of strong Parmesan grated<br>
- 2-4 tablespoons of nutritional yeast (we use the flaky type - not the fine powder)<br>
- 1-2 tablespoons chili powder<br>
- 2-3 teaspoons garlic powder<br><br>
Add the 2 tbs of oil and 2 kernels of corn to the pan and heat until the two pop. Then add the rest of the kernels. Shake the pan regularly on high heat until everything is popped. Dump into a bowl and sprinkle the final 1 tbs of olive oil over the top. Then sprinkle/grate all other ingredients over that. By the time we are about 1/2 through the giant bowl, we often replenish a few of the spices depending on how well we mixed them initially.<br><br>
Enjoy!
 

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Jaxon, you're living my dream!<br><br>
I can't add much, except maybe think about solar panels or a wind turbine for the future to power a small refrigerator.<br><br>
I'm curious:<br>
What is your boat called?<br>
How is it rigged?<br>
Will you be baking your own bread as you go?<br>
What about internet service? Will you be able to stay in touch with us?
 

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You can get some wheat gluten to mix up your own seitan. Dry tvp can be stored next to forever before adding liquid to it and cooking. Have you considered growing some food of your own? Maybe some spinach or herbs potted up to harvest as needed, at least until you entered salt water.<br>
Sounds like fun!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>jaxonk</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3003479"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I wonder how long the shelf-life is.</div>
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I know it's at least a couple of months, because a couple of times I've forgotten about it completely, and then it was totally fine when I rediscovered it in the pantry : )
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Jaxon, you're living my dream!<br><br>
I can't add much, except maybe think about solar panels or a wind turbine for the future to power a small refrigerator.<br><br>
I'm curious:<br>
What is your boat called?<br>
How is it rigged?<br>
Will you be baking your own bread as you go?<br>
What about internet service? Will you be able to stay in touch with us?</div>
</div>
<br>
Hi there Capstan,<br>
Thanks for chiming in<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> Refrigeration is kind of our holly grail right now. You nailed one issue - electricity. The other is price. We actually have a brand new super-high output solar panel stored in our quarterberth, just itching to be mounted. The sticking point is that the panel is enormous and the only spot on the boat where it will fit is on top of a cockpit bimini (see the below photo for an example) and we are going to need both a bit more expendable income and time in one place before we can get one of those made. After that is installed, we will have a lot of electricity, but the 12v marine fridges all cost over $1000 unfortunately and we haven't found much for used ones.. Either way, it's the direction we're going - but it will likely take a few months.<br>
BTW you have good taste in dreams<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"> This life is pretty great. It has its challenges of course, but so does every lifestyle... and not every lifestyle has mojitos while sailing into a sunset<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br>
Regarding your other questions:<br>
Boat's name: Surkha<br>
Rigging: Bermuda/Marconi Rig (single mast, two sails - one forward, one aft, both triangular) - other infos: tiller steered, made in 1975, 28' long and 43 tall, model: Ranger 28<br>
Baking bread: I really hope so. I grew up in a bakery that my parents owned/ran and since that changed hands my pops and I built a big outdoor wood-fired, bread/pizza oven, which he has baked 6 loafs of sourdough in every weekend for 8 years... My fiance and I also try to bake bread a fair amount but we typically had a freezer-full of his bread and never "needed" to. On the boat, the only issue is the oven's fuel usage. We need to find a more economical source of high-potency alcohol to run the stove on. I can go into some more detail about that on the blog, but suffice it to say that you'd have a couple of really good friends if you could find a source for medical or industrial grade alcohol that hasn't been "poisoned" for non-consumption like denatured alcohol is.<br>
Internet: We have a pretty sweet setup right now. Basically a Verizon data plan shot through a router for wicked-quick 3g/4g all over the boat. I run a web development business and we do freelance photo-journalism, writing and documentary work - so solid digital connectivity is key to making this whole lifestyle work for us. (I'm writing from our chilly cabin right now. Waves slapping the hull and little skiffs racing a regatta around us in Milwaukee's harbor).<br><br>
Have a great day and definitely check out the blog: <a href="http://mangolandia.com" target="_blank">http://mangolandia.com</a><br>
We're posting a couple times a day there, with enough photos and stories to keep any "armchair cruiser" content<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>jaxonk</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3003754"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
....but the 12v marine fridges all cost over $1000 unfortunately and we haven't found much for used ones.</div>
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Have you looked into over-the-road truck refrigerators? I know marine equipment can be very pricey. How well one would adapt to marine use, particularly exposure to salt air, I don't know, but they're typically about half the price. They're designed for travel and work very well.<br><br>
Am definitely going to check out your blog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Capstan</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3003774"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Have you looked into over-the-road truck refrigerators? I know marine equipment can be very pricey. How well one would adapt to marine use, particularly exposure to salt air, I don't know, but they're typically about half the price. They're designed for travel and work very well.<br><br>
Am definitely going to check out your blog.</div>
</div>
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Yep, 12v trucking and RV equipment both fit the bill some of the time. Salt air, lots of jostling and a generally wet environment are all factors, but there is certainly some wiggle room. If you know of any specific models, definitely send a link our way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>_elle_</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3003529"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
You can get some wheat gluten to mix up your own seitan. Dry tvp can be stored next to forever before adding liquid to it and cooking. Have you considered growing some food of your own? Maybe some spinach or herbs potted up to harvest as needed, at least until you entered salt water.<br>
Sounds like fun!</div>
</div>
<br>
This is great Elle! I had never heard of TVP before and had to look it up. Based on the wikipedia article, it seems like it may be the answer to my ongoing question of "what is the chewy stuff in all these fake meat products?"... Either way, I did not know it existed, more or less that it was available in retail shops. We'll definitely give it a shot. Is this the main ingredient in Seitan also or is it wheat gluten? Do you have a favorite recipe to make it? Spinach or other leafy things are a possibility but horizontal space is at a major premium and when things get rough, anything that's not tied down is at risk. Maybe one of those mini vertical/hanging gardens... hmm.... Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>jennyface</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3003694"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I know it's at least a couple of months, because a couple of times I've forgotten about it completely, and then it was totally fine when I rediscovered it in the pantry : )</div>
</div>
<br>
Perfect. We're at WF now and it's on the shopping list<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>jaxonk</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3003816"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
This is great Elle! I had never heard of TVP before and had to look it up. Based on the wikipedia article, it seems like it may be the answer to my ongoing question of "what is the chewy stuff in all these fake meat products?"... Either way, I did not know it existed, more or less that it was available in retail shops. We'll definitely give it a shot. Is this the main ingredient in Seitan also or is it wheat gluten? Do you have a favorite recipe to make it? Spinach or other leafy things are a possibility but horizontal space is at a major premium and when things get rough, anything that's not tied down is at risk. Maybe one of those mini vertical/hanging gardens... hmm.... Thanks!</div>
</div>
<br>
Wheat gluten comes as a flour and is what seitan is made from (adding a flavored liquid, then boiling or baking it, depending on what you like.)<br>
TVP is soy protein and is a good substitute for ground meats in recipes, especially spicy recipes as tvp has not taste of its own, it absorbs the flavor of what it's cooked in. For example, I use one measuring cup of tvp, one can of Manwich Sauce, and about four ounces of water, all simmered together to make sloppy joes. Maybe that isn't a particularly "foodie" meal, but I like it and nobody in my family can tell it isn't meat, so no whining about me serving vegetarian meals all the time. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"><br>
TVP reconstituted with water + taco seasoning is perfect unmeat for tacos, taco salads, etc.<br>
The commercially available fake meats are often a combination of tvp and wheat gluten, and sometimes are something completely different.
 
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