VeggieBoards banner
1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know of any vegetarian veterinarians? I want to take my pooches for a checkup, but I want to be sure that the doc is in tune with the way I feel about animals.

A while ago there was a thread about a woman who got her veterinary degree without performing any dissections, vivisection or nasty stuff to animals. That's the kind of person I'll trust with my pooches' well being. Anyone know of any?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by berrykat View Post

maybe contact this group for a vet referal http://avar.org/avar_vet_tech_comments.asp its the association of veterinarians for animal rights. hope this helps sorry about my poor spelling
If you have poor spelling then I must have it too, because I didn't see anything wrong.
Hey THANKS bk! That site is perfect. I had no idea such groups existed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,067 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeflatorMouse View Post

A while ago there was a thread about a woman who got her veterinary degree without performing any dissections, vivisection or nasty stuff to animals.
I think that's very rare though. She and a few others were, to my knowledge, the first to do so in Europe, and in a country as backwards about animal welfare as the US, that would probably be even more rare. So if you don't want to travel to Norway to find Siri Martinsen, you might have to compromise


Personally, I don't see it so important to have a veg*n veterinarian, because it may not affect the quality of treatment which is the main issue.
 

·
...
Joined
·
3,936 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeflatorMouse View Post

A while ago there was a thread about a woman who got her veterinary degree without performing any dissections, vivisection or nasty stuff to animals. That's the kind of person I'll trust with my pooches' well being. Anyone know of any?
dissection?

What about dentists? I gather that they train on pigs heads.

I don't really like this idea but I don't see how one can avoid the dentist indefinitely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
787 Posts
It seems to me that the dissections are also a rather important part of a veterinarian's education, in order to become familiar with the body systems a veterinarian is responsible for treating. I would not be easily convinced to take one of my pets to someone who has missed out on those crucial parts of education, regardless of the cruelty it entails. This is a situation in which the end justifies the means, I think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
I've dated 3 different vegetarian vets or vet students (I lived in a town that had a vet school), and all of them participated in dissections, putting down animals, etc. At first I was horrified that a vegetarian would participate in those kinds of things, but from what I gathered, dissections, etc. are pretty much mandatory if you want to become a good vet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by oriole View Post

I was horrified that a vegetarian would participate in those kinds of things, but from what I gathered, dissections, etc. are pretty much mandatory if you want to become a good vet.
Yeah, isn't that just so... wrong? Must... resist... temptation... to debate... the hypocrisy of destroying life to save life!!


Anyway, I see what you guys are saying that it's practically impossible to find a non-vivisectionist vet in the USA. Time to brush up on my Norwegian, I guess. Thanks for the link, 7S--she's indeed the one. I think I'll send her an email asking if she can refer me to anyone stateside.

If there's anyone in the USA who had the guts to do what she did, then I want to support that person 100%, even if it means travelling across a few state lines. So you see, my intentions are twofold. Sure I want a clean conscience by making a hypocrisy-free decision, but perhaps more importantly I want to help some struggling vet who went to great trouble to get a cruelty-free degree. If that person exists.

Well I guess I'll get to work researching with all the info you guys have given me. Thanks for the tips, and keep em coming.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,950 Posts
I wouldnt WANT a vet who hadnt practised on dead animals. First time operations/etc shouldnt be on live animals. High school kids do not need to do disections, vet students do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,664 Posts
Some vet schools are better than others; the vet school I had been applying to didn't put animals down for the sole purpose of teaching the students. The animals students used were either donated by people whose pets had died, or they came from the local shelter after they had been euthanised (sadly, it is not a no-kill shelter). So no animals were killed simply for the use of the students, but they were animals that were dead regardless and were donated for educational purposes.

They also kept live beagles, each student was fully responsible for two of them, and they were used in behavior classes. After a couple of years, the dogs were retired and adopted out. Cows and horses were also kept for educational purposes and they had strict conditions around their use.

So not all vets necessarily participated in questionable practices during their training. Back when I was a potential vet student, I was very concerned around their use of animals, and after hearing their explanations for where they got their animals and how they were used, I was ok with that, recognizing that you can't go through vet training without having animals involved in one way or another.

Sorry, I know this doesn't help you find a good vet, I just wanted to point out how some vet schools operate. I don't know if that use of animals falls within what you would consider ethical treatment or not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,186 Posts
I know of one in the NY or MA area. Anyways, he sometimes attends the Albany veg group.

I'm not sure how he feels about vivisection or what sort of vet education he had.

It was my understanding that some kind of disection is neccesary in all medical fields, even the fringe ones. They even make people training to be massage therapists do some disection sometimes because they train along side nurses.

I know he is supportive of having dogs and cats on veg*n diets, which would be a plus if you have a dog or cat and want to go in that direction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
847 Posts
I'm a veg vet and I've found that the major reason for doing disection (cutting up DEAD animals to learn their anatomy) is crucial to training. By doing an actual disection, the student learns the texture difference between connective tissue, nerve and vessels (very important when doing spays- especially on older overweight dogs!!!). By having multiple animals in the room for study, natural variation in animals can be observed. The anatomy dog of one of the other groups in my class had an odd vein pattern from the hind end. It helped me when I had to amputate the leg of a cat that had been broken for at least a week (she was found as a stray in this condition, probably HBC). We also did surgeries on dogs that were later euthanized (under anesthesia for the last surgery). While I did not like this, we were told at the very beginning of school that we would have to do this or not pass the class and fail out of vet school. It did help me later when I was thrown into doing a gut resection without someone to mentor me through it. We thought it was am infected uterus of a humane society cat (ie keep it low cost by not doing some diagnostics that wold have warned us that that was not the problem) and it ended up being a section of dead gut that had to be removed. Just reading about the surgery does not prepare you for knowing what color the gut should be, it's normal size and motility either.

Practice surgeries are done in some school, but the protocol used (anesthetics, pain meds, etc.) are the same as those that would be used as if the animal were a pet and expected to survive. Often the animal is euthanized without recovering from anesthetic or the procedure is such that the animal would not be in severe pain (no breaking and setting of bones, chest surgeries or such, typically spays, neuters, splenectomy, gastrotomy, etc).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
I'm working on my bio degree to go to vet school and was wondering if there were any actual vegan vets on this board..I worked for a vegetarian vet at one time and she was very clear at how heartless vet school can be (that a lot of students weren't exactly in it for the animals).

However, to be a good vet you'll be faced with life and death every day, and dissection is sadly a crucial part of understanding anatomy that you'll be dealing with in your profession.........and who wants a surgeon that's never actually practiced surgery???

I would never condone or want to be a part of killing animals solely for training purposes -- but if they are already dead..........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,664 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElectricGreen View Post

I'm working on my bio degree to go to vet school and was wondering if there were any actual vegan vets on this board..I worked for a vegetarian vet at one time and she was very clear at how heartless vet school can be (that a lot of students weren't exactly in it for the animals).

However, to be a good vet you'll be faced with life and death every day, and dissection is sadly a crucial part of understanding anatomy that you'll be dealing with in your profession.........and who wants a surgeon that's never actually practiced surgery???

I would never condone or want to be a part of killing animals solely for training purposes -- but if they are already dead..........
Not all vet schools are created equal. When I looked into it, I was appalled at the things some schools did to animals for the sake of research.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Like ElectricGreen & fyvel said, I don't have a problem with students learning on cadavers that are already dead (just like in the human medical profession). But this is appalling:

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheekywhiskers View Post

We also did surgeries on dogs that were later euthanized (under anesthesia for the last surgery). While I did not like this, we were told at the very beginning of school that we would have to do this or not pass the class and fail out of vet school.
cheekyw, I'm not attacking you personally but rather your school's curriculum. How the frig can they justify euthanizing some poor dog just because she's outlived her clinical usefulness? That's just laziness & hypocrisy. I hope, like fyvel said, that not all schools engage in that sort of practice.

I once heard of a school that would offer free veterinary services to people who couldn't afford it. This provided (1) healthcare for animals who wouldn't get it otherwise; and (2) a way for students to "practice" on living creatures. While I'm sure the quality of care wasn't up to par, at least I can't fault that system for being hypocritical. At worst, they'd be incompetent. But that's much better than being deliberately murderous. (Btw I'm not sure, but I think it was Berkely.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,664 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeflatorMouse View Post

cheekyw, I'm not attacking you personally but rather your school's curriculum. How the frig can they justify euthanizing some poor dog just because she's outlived her clinical usefulness? That's just laziness & hypocrisy. I hope, like fyvel said, that not all schools engage in that sort of practice.
Sadly, that is a somewhat humane practice compared to some I've heard of. At least the animal is under anaesthetic for it's final surgery (not that I am justifying it). I've heard of some vet schools that will deliberately break a dog's leg, just so a vet student can fix it. This is heresay though, as I saw it posted on a discussion group by a current (or previous) student, discussing the ethics of that particular school.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
531 Posts
fyvel- what school were you applying to? I'm an aspiring vet, and while I'm willing to go to vet school and do the horrible things so that I can move on and do overall good, I'd really would prefer to find a nice school
 

·
Ankle Biter
Joined
·
9,333 Posts
My vet is a vegetarian. Since he went to Virginia Tech, I imagine he did all that was required to get his degree. However, I do admire that he is now a vegetarian, and I tell him that every time I see him.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top