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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Where do you guys buy your veggies from? I am trying to avoid veggies fertilized by animal manure.
 

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So manure isn't vegan but chicken eggs are?
 

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I'd prefer veggies fertilized by manure than manmade fertilizers

I prefer farmer's markets when I can, or home grown... not always easy to do this when I am living in the city but here in the country it's more readily available.
 

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I used to buy all my veggies just from the grocery stores. But we've moved out west and they have these stores called Sprouts Farmers Market which has a huge produce section. A lot of their stuff is bought locally (they actually have a spot on their website that shows where their food comes from depending on the type and what month you're in). And their prices are great. So since we've discovered Sprouts, that's pretty much where we get all our fruits and veggies, along with some other things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Werewolf Girl View Post

So manure isn't vegan but chicken eggs are?
That was a more ethical discussion than anything just wanted a point counter point type of thing. Well I know where most animal manure comes from, those same mega farms that mistreat animals. How is using manure from abused animals any different than taking eggs from well treated animals?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by V.L.F View Post

That was a more ethical discussion than anything just wanted a point counter point type of thing. Well I know where most animal manure comes from, those same mega farms that mistreat animals. How is using manure from abused animals any different than taking eggs from well treated animals?
Well, animals aren't abused and held captive and slaughtered for their manure, it's a byproduct of the industry. This is similar to the argument that vegans can't eat vegetables or fruits because animals like birds, field mice, worms, etc may have been killed indirectly during harvesting. In a vegan world we'd be able to reuse waste efficiently and people wouldn't shoot birds and kill animals to harvest crops, but we're not there yet


Veganic farming and composting are an option though, if you can grow your own food I strongly recommend it! There are some great 'how to' websites out there.

In the end it comes down to what is possible and practical for each person. You can thrive without eating animal products but you'll die without eating plants, so if you aren't able to grow food or find a farm you know for sure is veganic there isn't a lot you can do. Starving to death isn't going to help any animals and if anything would give people more reason to say we're all wacko
 

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I think a good question to ask yourself is why are you vegan? Are you vegan to reduce suffering as much as possible or for the sake of personal purity? Is obsessing over every little thing going to help spread the word about animal cruelty issues and help animals or is it going to shut yourself off from people and make it impossible to live?

This is a great article on that subject: http://www.veganoutreach.org/howvegan.html

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Knowing this, the issue for thoughtful, compassionate people isn't, "Is this vegan?" Rather, the important question is: "Which choice leads to less suffering?" Our guide shouldn't be an endless list of ingredients, but rather doing our absolute best to stop cruelty to animals. Veganism is important, not as an end in itself, but as a powerful tool for opposing the horrors of factory farms and industrial slaughterhouses.
This moves the discussion away from finding a definition or avoiding a certain product, and into the realm of effective advocacy. In other words, the focus isn't so much our personal beliefs or specific choices, but rather the animals and their suffering.
If we believe that being vegan is important, being the most effective advocate for the animals must be seen as even more important! The impact of our individual veganism - several hundred animals over the course of a lifetime - pales in comparison to what we have the potential to accomplish with our example. For every person inspired to change their habits, the impact we have on the world multiplies!
Conversely, for every person we convince that veganism is overly demanding by obsessing with an ever-increasing list of ingredients, we do worse than nothing: we turn someone away who could have made a real difference for animals if they hadn't met us! Currently the vast majority of people in our society have no problem eating the actual leg of a chicken. It is not surprising that many people dismiss vegans as unreasonable and irrational when our example includes interrogating waiters, not eating veggie burgers cooked on the same grill with meat, not taking photographs or using medicines, etc.
Instead of spending our limited time and resources worrying about the margins (cane sugar, film, medicine, etc.), our focus should be on increasing our impact every day. Helping just one person change leads to hundreds fewer animals suffering in factory farms. By choosing to promote compassionate eating, every person we meet is a potential major victory.
 

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'Lo VLF


Werewolf Girl has said a lot of things on this already that, imho, are just pure common sense.

Trying to push the next boundary (which is what you are trying to acheive?) is both worthy and commendable, I like to think.

Sometimes though we just have to accept that how clean we can make ourselves is always going to be limited by how dirty is our world?
 

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Look for hydroponic vegetables. They aren't always easy to find. There's a hydroponic farm about 35 miles from me. I have never been to it myself, but I have had vegetables that they grew at a deli and at a health food store.
 
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