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artisan vegan princess
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hey everyone! it's izzy, and i just got back from whole foods to get protein powder & b-12 supplements. anyways, while i was there i was lectured about how my vegan diet would be horrible for my blood type O+. apparently my blood type needs red meats or else it won't function properly.. i am so freaked out right now, i don't know whether to believe them or not. is anyone a long-term vegan with an O+ blood type? i've felt fine within this week experience being vegan and i've been eating healthier than i ever have! any advice for me? it would be so greatly appreciated!
background info about me: i swim 4 hours a day, i'm 16, 5'5" & 112lbs
 

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I've been eating about 90 percent plant-based (the other ten percent isn't for my health, it's for my limited restaurant options) with no meat at all, since 2008. My blood type is O positive as well. I marvel at how unrestrained people can be, lecturing perfect strangers about what they eat. I saw an awesome shirt that said "Don't ask me about my protein and I won't ask you about your cholesterol."
 

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Oh lord. There is absolutely no validity to the blood type thing. It's total nonsense. Some scientists conducted an extensive study to test the hypothesis in the popular Blood Type Diet book and found absolutely no correlation between blood type and nutritional requirements (http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/271349.php) which isn't surprising when you consider that there's no reason there would be.
 

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Vegan since 1991
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Hi waterbunni,

Please take the time to read this entire post. I have been a vegan for 24 years, and this information is important for you.

The American Heart Association, the American Diabetes Association, and Kaiser Permanente have all stated that properly-planned vegan diets are healthy. These reputable organizations make no distinctions between blood types when it comes to vegan diets. Vegan diets are healthy for everyone.

It's never a good idea to believe health information from random people at supermarkets. Even the "vitamin advisors" at Whole Foods Market are not reliable; they are not Registered Dietitians, and they have no deep education within nutrition.

The American Diabetes Association makes this statement regarding vegan diets:

"A vegetarian diet is a healthy option, even if you have diabetes. Research supports that following this type of diet can help prevent and manage diabetes. In fact, research on vegan diets has found that carbohydrate and calorie restrictions were not necessary and still promoted weight loss and lowered participants' A1C"
Link to this statement: http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/meal-planning-for-vegetarians/

The American Heart Association makes this statement regarding vegetarian diets:

"Many studies have shown that vegetarians seem to have a lower risk of obesity, coronary heart disease (which causes heart attack), high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus and some forms of cancer."
Link to this statement: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Getti...nter/Vegetarian-Diets_UCM_306032_Article.jsp#

Kaiser Permanente makes this statement regarding plant-based vegan diets:

"Research shows that plant-based diets are cost-effective, low-risk interventions that may lower body mass index, blood pressure, HbA1C, and cholesterol levels. They may also reduce the number of medications needed to treat chronic diseases and lower ischemic heart disease mortality rates. Physicians should consider recommending a plant-based diet to all their patients, especially those with high blood pressure, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or obesity."
Link to this statement: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3662288/

Kaiser Permanente has even published its own vegan nutrition guide: http://www.kphealthyme.com/Healthy-...ams/Education-libraries/Plant-Based-Diet.aspx

Very important! Read on:

There's one thing that you must pay close attention to. As an athlete, swimming 4 hours per day, your calorie needs are much higher than the average person. This is especially true for such a slender person as you.

According to Harvard Medical School, vigorous swimming burns 300 calories per 30 minutes http://www.health.harvard.edu/diet-...-30-minutes-of-leisure-and-routine-activities . If you are doing 4 hours of vigorous swimming per day, then this is 2400 extra calories that you must consume in order to stay healthy! You might need 3500-4000 total calories per day to maintain your energy, depending on how vigorously you swim during those 4 hours.

Because many vegan staple foods (beans, grains, vegetables) are low in calories, you could easily make the mistake of not eating enough calories, and this will leave you feeling exhausted.

Here are typical calories for various vegan staples:

One cup of boiled beans contains about 240 calories

One cup of boiled grains/pasta contains about 200 calories

One cup of fresh (not dried) fruit contains about 40-100 calories

One cup of non-starchy vegetables contains about 5-40 calories

One cup of nuts or seeds contains 700-1000 calories

One tablespoon of vegetable oil contains 120 calories

You must remember to eat plenty on a vegan diet! If you have trouble getting enough calories, eat more nuts, nut butters, seeds, and/or dried fruits.

 

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hey everyone! it's izzy, and i just got back from whole foods to get protein powder & b-12 supplements. anyways, while i was there i was lectured about how my vegan diet would be horrible for my blood type O+. apparently my blood type needs red meats or else it won't function properly.. i am so freaked out right now, i don't know whether to believe them or not. is anyone a long-term vegan with an O+ blood type? i've felt fine within this week experience being vegan and i've been eating healthier than i ever have! any advice for me? it would be so greatly appreciated!
background info about me: i swim 4 hours a day, i'm 16, 5'5" & 112lbs
I'm O positive.

I haven't eaten red meat for forty-four years and my health has always been excellent!
 

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Beanitarian
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This is why I prefer this forum greatly to other vegetarian forums. There is a tendency towards facts instead of woo. In other forums, anyone doubting the woo would be gang bullied.

Anyway OP, sites like nih.gov, cdc.gov, cancer.org, sciencebasedmedicine.org, etc. are reliable. You will not see any of those touting the blood type diet.
 

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This is why I prefer this forum greatly to other vegetarian forums. There is a tendency towards facts instead of woo. In other forums, anyone doubting the woo would be gang bullied.

Anyway OP, sites like nih.gov, cdc.gov, cancer.org, sciencebasedmedicine.org, etc. are reliable. You will not see any of those touting the blood type diet.
Same here! I have a very low tolerance for woo.
 

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Oh go on ... who doesn't love a bit of woo and weyhey and whoopsy daisy this theory has no grounding in reality. :p

To the OP - please don't let this strange person in Whole Foods get you down. They had literally no idea what they were talking about - you can safely eat a vegan diet without worrying about your blood type.
 

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I love reading these types of threads. Those were some very great facts and I agree. I am no nutritionist but I would tell the OP they probably do not need B-12 supplements at this point in time. From everything I have read and seen on documentaries it takes a very long time to become deficient of B-12. I suggest having blood work done at least every 6 months and they can check for that.
 

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I love reading these types of threads. Those were some very great facts and I agree. I am no nutritionist but I would tell the OP they probably do not need B-12 supplements at this point in time. From everything I have read and seen on documentaries it takes a very long time to become deficient of B-12. I suggest having blood work done at least every 6 months and they can check for that.
This is a dangerous myth. B12 stores can become depleted quickly, especially if you only ate a small amount of animal products for a period of time before becoming vegan. All vegans should supplement B12 right away. Deficiency is so easy to prevent and can cause permanent nerve damage -- why wait for your levels to drop? Here are the recommendations:

http://www.theveganrd.com/2010/11/recommended-supplements-for-vegans.html
Vitamin B12. You can't get enough by eating unwashed organic produce or mushrooms grown in B12-rich soil. The recommended dose is 25 to 100 micrograms per day or 1,000 micrograms 2-3 times per week. If you have not been taking B12 for a while, start out with 2,000 micrograms daily for several weeks. Or get a blood test to see where you are and whether you might need a more therapeutic dose.
Also: http://www.veganhealth.org/b12/rec

And, to the OP, as others have said, the blood type diet is a fad diet that has been thoroughly debunked. A growing and very active young person like yourself does need to be concerned with nutrition, so make sure you have enough balanced meals and snacks so you are feeding your body enough. Be wary of adding any additional restrictions such as avoiding oil, nuts and seeds, refined grains, etc -- all of these can have a place in a healthy vegan diet.
 

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artisan vegan princess
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Oh go on ... who doesn't love a bit of woo and weyhey and whoopsy daisy this theory has no grounding in reality. :p

To the OP - please don't let this strange person in Whole Foods get you down. They had literally no idea what they were talking about - you can safely eat a vegan diet without worrying about your blood type.
actually the person at whole foods told me they were a nutritionist.. they said A blood types are great as vegans and O's will have many difficulties.. i was told i need to have more protein than the average vegan and i will probably feel light headed, but anyways i told them i wasn't switching back to my regular diet.
 

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hello! Lots of good here, but I'd like add my opinion, for anyone just switching to a plant based diet, but esp for someone as active as you. Normally I would say you'll get enough enough protein just by eating a variety of foods, but the fact is, meat is really high in protein, and in the beginning you're not going to eat as well as you will after you've been vegan for a good while. There is more to changing than just eliminating animal products, --it's mostly about the new foods you add!

I would suggest trying a protein vitamin shake, which is what the 'nutritionist' at WF's should have suggested. I found those useful in the beginning when I had to think about what to eat, and wasn't so sure of getting everything I needed. They're super quick, and so many to choose from.
This was one both my son and I liked. It has stevia which I found was best mixed with coffee, but my son used soy or almond milk. --
http://www.amazon.com/Green-Foods-V...&sr=8-1&keywords=true+vitality+protein+powder

BTW- B12 might stay in your system a long time, but deficiency is not good. If you eat cereals fortified, or non dairy milks that have it, on a daily basis you'll be fine. If not, those tablets that dissolve under your tongue are cheap and easy. I would recommend getting a bloodtest just to have something to compare.
 

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Vegan since 1991
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actually the person at whole foods told me they were a nutritionist.. they said A blood types are great as vegans and O's will have many difficulties..
Hi Izzy,

That person's title of "nutritionist" doesn't mean much. Unfortunately, there are no nationally-standardized educational requirements for becoming a nutritionist. In some states, anyone can call themselves a nutritionist, regardless of their education or experience: http://www.nutritioned.org/dietitian-vs-nutritionist.html

In contrast, a Registered Dietitian must graduate from a university dietetics program that is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics: http://www.eatrightacend.org/ACEND/content.aspx?id=73 Registered Dietitians must pass a national certification exam, and they must undergo standardized, continuing education throughout their careers. http://www.nutritioned.org/dietitian-vs-nutritionist.html .

The peer-reviewed nutrition publications have all concluded that the "Blood Type Diet" has no basis in fact. Although each of the recommended "blood type" diets can be healthy, there is no evidence that people must choose a diet based on their blood type, nor that they must avoid certain healthy diets because of their blood type. Please see these studies from these reputable publications:

From the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/98/1/99

From the National Institutes of Health: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3893150/

Izzy, if you'd like to consult with a nutrition professional, you might consider making an appointment with a Registered Dietitian. In the United States, you can find a local Registered Dietitian through this website: http://www.eatright.org . Just click on the "Find an Expert" button, located in the upper-right-hand portion of the webpage. On this website, if you wish, you can select a Registered Dietitian who specializes in vegetarian diets.
 

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Oryzatarian
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I resisted the urge to read this thread for a day just so I could see other people say the same as I knew I would:
No legitimate health authority recommends diets based on blood type, and you should be careful about advice gleaned in the super market ;)
actually the person at whole foods told me they were a nutritionist
In the united states the term nutritionist has no legal meaning, anyone can call themselves a nutritionist even if they dont know phosphorus from phylloquinone. I can call myself the king of the potato people, but I doubt I'll be revered as a noble monarch.
 

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I resisted the urge to read this thread for a day just so I could see other people say the same as I knew I would:
No legitimate health authority recommends diets based on blood type, and you should be careful about advice gleaned in the super market ;)In the united states the term nutritionist has no legal meaning, anyone can call themselves a nutritionist even if they dont know phosphorus from phylloquinone. I can call myself the king of the potato people, but I doubt I'll be revered as a noble monarch.
I totally agree! A lot of "personal trainers" get a few months of training and a certificate and call themselves nutritionists. A certificate and a few months of classes holds little water when it comes to the complicated relationship between diet, health, and disease. A registered dietician requires at least a bachelors degree and often a masters. And as someone who works in the medical profession, I can assure you that no properly trained dietician (or any doctor who isn't a quack) is going to agree with the blood type diet.
 

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Beanitarian
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David3 beat me to it--I've recently learned the term "nutritionist" is not very regulated and is being used by many charlatans.

If you're interested in pseudoscientific nutrition and humor, I highly recommend joining a Facebook group called Banned by Food Babe. You will learn a wealth of info. Food Babe is a computer science major who gives medical and nutrition advice to the scientifically illiterate masses. She's very popular and very dangerous in her misinformation. She also has quite the "interesting" behaviors.
 

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Not such a Beginner ;)
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I resisted the urge to read this thread for a day just so I could see other people say the same as I knew I would:
No legitimate health authority recommends diets based on blood type, and you should be careful about advice gleaned in the super market ;)In the united states the term nutritionist has no legal meaning, anyone can call themselves a nutritionist even if they dont know phosphorus from phylloquinone. I can call myself the king of the potato people, but I doubt I'll be revered as a noble monarch.
All about taters for your subjects:

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/1105586
 
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