VeggieBoards banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I apologize if this is in the wrong area- I have not posted in quite some time and there have been some category changes. Feel free to shift this post around if there is a more appropriate place.<br><br><br><br>
Basically- I've just recently been diagnosed with Crohn's and I have NO idea what to eat that won't set me off. I'm also dead-set on continuing to be vegan. I have problems with a lot of grains (which is killing me because I'm addicted to oatmeal, granola and 20-grain bread), uncooked vegetables (aka: fiber), anything with high fat content (can't do anything fried, avacados, etc). So what the hell am I SUPPOSED to eat? I'm so sick of being sick all the time.<br><br>
I've asked all my doctors what I should eat and they all tell me that I'll never make it if I'm a vegan. That I have to go back to eating meat. I really don't think that's possible; I haven't had meat in about 10 years and I'm quite certain it would make me sick.
 

·
Vegan Police Officer
Joined
·
5,211 Posts
Jaeska: Please consider going <b>raw</b>. And check out David Klein's colitis-crohns website.<br><br><br><br>
Whatever you do, DO NOT EAT DAIRY OR MEAT. And find a way to kill your addiction to grains.<br><br><br><br>
Doctors know piss all about nutrition and inflammatory bowel diseases. Absoutely piss all. The moment you mention to a gastro-enterologist that you are vegan, they stiffen and bristle like a dog in danger. If they could, they would bare their teeth.<br><br><br><br>
David Klein's website is here: <a href="http://www.colitis-crohns.com/" target="_blank">http://www.colitis-crohns.com/</a><br><br><br><br>
I suggest you buy his book. It is a wealth of information and gives you a path to follow to heal yourself from this debilitating disease.<br><br><br><br>
As to meat and dairy, and if you can afford to buy books, I would STRONGLY recommend you buy The China Study: <a href="http://www.thechinastudy.com/" target="_blank">http://www.thechinastudy.com/</a><br><br><br><br>
And please give the link to The China Study to your doctor. He will not like it that you give him the link, but give it to him anyway. MEAT IS SUICIDE.<br><br><br><br>
In no time, you will be more knowledgeable about Nutrition and Inflammatory Bowel Disease than the average doctor. Do not forget that the average doctor is just a DONKEY IN A WHITE COAT. You can find good doctors out there, but it's like finding a needle in a haystack.<br><br><br><br>
DO NOT LOSE HOPE NOR COURAGE. If you've only recently been diagnosed, you've got a lot of advantages on your side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,079 Posts
My nephew was thought to have Crohn's but the doctors are not able to agree on a diagnosis. He has had three surgeries to remove parts of his intestines. This has been helpful to him in managing his illness. He is not vegetarian but the information can easily be adapted to a vegan lifestyle.<br><br><span style="color:#FF0000;">I am not advocating in any way that this will absolutely work for you, only offering some information that has helped my nephew.</span><br><br><br><br><span style="color:#0000FF;">IBD Diet for Crohn's Disease and Colitis<br><br>
Drink lots of fluid (8 - 10 servings daily) to keep body hydrated and prevent constipation<br><br>
Your doctor or your registered dietitian may recommend a daily multivitamin-mineral supplement to replace lost nutrients<br><br>
Eat a high fiber diet when IBD is under control. Click here for a list of high fiber foods. Some patients find cooking and steaming the vegetables more tolerable than eating them raw<br><br>
During a flare up, however, limit high fiber foods and follow a low fiber diet or even a <span style="color:#FF0000;">low residue diet</span> to give the bowel a rest and minimize symptoms. Click here for a list of low fiber foods.<br><br>
Avoid lactose-containing foods such as dairy if you are lactose intolerance. Otherwise, you may use lactase enzymes and lactase pretreated foods. For details, please read Lactose Intolerance Management<br><br>
It is very important to continue nourishing your body even during a flare-up. Try small frequent meals. Eating a high protein diet with lean meats, fish and eggs, may help relieve symptoms of IBD. Your registered dietitian may recommend pre-digested nutritional drinks (elemental diet) to give your bowel a rest and replenish lost nutrients so that your body can repair itself<br><br>
Limit caffeine, alcohol and sorbitol (a type of sweetener) as these may exacerbate IBD symptoms. Click here for a list of food products containing sorbitol<br><br>
Limit gas-producing foods such as cabbage-family vegetables (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower and brussels sprouts), dried peas and lentils, onions and chives, peppers and carbonated drinks<br><br>
Reduce fat intake if part of the intestines has been surgically removed. High fat foods usually cause diarrhea and gas for this group of patients<br><br>
If the ileum (part of the small intestines) has been resected, a Vitamin B12 injection may be required<br><br>
Some studies found that fish oil and flax seed oil may be helpful in managing IBD. Some also suggested the role of prebiotics such as psyllium in the healing process. Furthermore, probiotics (live culture) may also be helpful in aiding recovery of the intestines.</span> To my knowledge, soy yogurt has live cultures.<br><br><br><br><span style="color:#0000FF;">Low Residue Diet<br><br>
Written by: Gloria Tsang, R.D.<br><br>
last updated: June 2006<br><br>
A low-residue / low fiber diet may be recommended during the flare-up periods of diverticulitis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD - Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). It may also be recommended as a pre- and post-operation diet to decrease bowel volume. An intake of less than 10 g of fiber per day is generally considered a low residue/low fiber diet.<br><br><br><br>
Many people use the terms "low-residue diet" and "low-fiber diet" interchangeably. Note that they are similar but not exactly the same however. Some low fiber foods, such as dairy and coffee, can actually increase residue or stimulate bowel movement. Some foods that are lower in residue, such as blenderized bran, are indeed high in fiber. In general, a low-residue diet is more restrictive than a low-fiber diet. Therefore, it is important to check with your healthcare providers whether a low-fiber diet is sufficient or perhaps a true low-residue diet is required. If you have been on a low-residue diet for an extended period of time, your doctor may recommend a daily multi-vitamin/mineral supplement.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Low Residue Diet<br><br>
Grain Products:<br><br><br><br>
enriched refined white bread, buns, bagels, english muffins<br><br>
plain cereals e.g. Cheerios, Cornflakes, Cream of Wheat, Rice Krispies, Special K<br><br>
arrowroot cookies, tea biscuits, soda crackers, plain melba toast<br><br>
white rice, refined pasta and noodles<br><br>
avoid whole grains<br><br>
Fruits:<br><br><br><br>
fruit juices except prune juice<br><br>
applesauce, apricots, banana (1/2), cantaloupe, canned fruit cocktail, grapes, honeydew melon, peaches, watermelon<br><br>
avoid raw and dried fruits, raisins and berries.<br><br>
Vegetables:<br><br><br><br>
vegetable juices<br><br>
potatoes (no skin)<br><br>
alfalfa sprouts, beets, green/yellow beans, carrots, celery, cucumber, eggplant, lettuce, mushrooms, green/red peppers, potatoes (peeled), squash, zucchini<br><br>
avoid vegetables from the cruciferous family such as broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, cabbage, kale, Swiss chard etc<br><br>
Meat and Protein Choice:<br><br><br><br>
well-cooked, tender meat, fish and eggs<br><br>
avoid beans and lentils<br><br>
Nuts and Seeds:<br><br><br><br>
Avoid all nuts and seeds, as well as foods that may contain seeds (such as yogurt)<br><br>
Dairy:<br><br><br><br>
as directed by your healthcare providers</span>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
NEVER FEAR! You can DEFINITELY be vegan with Crohn's and will be much better off for it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/carrot.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":vebo:"><br><br><br><br>
I was diagnosed with Crohn's in January of 2004 (when I was 21). I spent all of 2004 on steroids, in and out of the hospital and just sick all the time. In January of 2005 I went vegan and have been much better for it. The trick is to find out the foods that trigger you, which you already seem to have a handle on. Eliminate those foods, then slowly try new things. As far as grains, you may want to try millet - it's gluten-free and many people with Crohn's have wheat/gluten issues. I've also found quinoa to be really good and haven't had a problem with it - plus it's packed with protein. Spend some time a local health food store and just pick up things that you haven't tried before. My whole way of eating has completely changed and I've found that I love a lot of foods I had never even heard of before.<br><br><br><br>
I would also recommend looking for a doctor who is more in tune with your beliefs. I had 2 nutritionists and a GI doctor tell me I couldn't be vegan with Crohn's - basically because I needed meat so that I had "more food choices." I also had 3 other GI doctors who had no problem with the vegan thing, mainly because they didn't really know what it was. NOW, I've found a family practice doctor who uses a lot of natural practices and is completely supportive of my being vegan. He also has given me FAR more information on Crohn's disease and its causes than any of the GI doctors ever did and has been able to really sort out my whole health - beyond the Crohn's disease. You really have to be careful because once you have this "Crohn's" label, a lot of doctors just assume that everything that is wrong with you is due to that. I found out that I also have hypothyroidism and treating that has a come a long way in controlling the Crohn's. He also ordered an extensive food allergy test (the ALCAT) to see what foods could be triggering the Crohn's. You may want to look into a test like that if possible - a lot of the foods I eat all the time came up on the "intolerant" list, even ones that I never thought could trigger the Crohn's. It also helped in showing me which foods are okay for me and I have been developing a menu based off of those.<br><br><br><br>
In any case, I know that it's hard and it is a long process trying to figure out what foods will and won't work for you. The good news is, a vegan diet is probably the best diet to be on if you have bowel issues. It forces you to really think about what you're putting into your body and is just an overall healthier way to live. Feel free to PM me if you need any information or support. GOOD LUCK <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/broccoli.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":bobo:">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
Meat and alcohol (as well as other substances) might trigger flares.<br><br>
Green tea might reduce the risc for secondary carcinoma.<br><br>
Fiber is an issue in flares, though I don't know how much is tolerable during normal times. FridaVeg seems to be able to toterate quite a lot. If gluten is an issue: rice, amaranth, and kasha are also gluten-free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,660 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Jaeska</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I apologize if this is in the wrong area- I have not posted in quite some time and there have been some category changes. Feel free to shift this post around if there is a more appropriate place.<br><br><br><br>
Basically- I've just recently been diagnosed with Crohn's and I have NO idea what to eat that won't set me off. I'm also dead-set on continuing to be vegan. I have problems with a lot of grains (which is killing me because I'm addicted to oatmeal, granola and 20-grain bread), uncooked vegetables (aka: fiber), anything with high fat content (can't do anything fried, avacados, etc). So what the hell am I SUPPOSED to eat? I'm so sick of being sick all the time.<br><br>
I've asked all my doctors what I should eat and they all tell me that I'll never make it if I'm a vegan. That I have to go back to eating meat. I really don't think that's possible; I haven't had meat in about 10 years and I'm quite certain it would make me sick.</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
I have a friend who wrote a book about how she beat back her Crohn's into remission through diet.<br><br><br><br>
Virginia Harper, Controlling Crohn's Disease: The Natural Way.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=veggieboards.com-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fgp%2Fproduct%2F1575668319%2Fsr%3D1-4%2Fqid%3D1155744473%2Fref%3Dsr_1_4%2F104-1436706-6039112%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/157...e=UTF8&s=books</a><br><br><br><br>
Virginia follows a macrobiotic diet. The one she follows is for all practical purposes a vegan diet, but it also has emphases and restrictions that differ from veganism. The book also has about 50 pages of recipes.<br><br><br><br>
I see from Amazon that this book is almost a rare book, since used and new copies are going for $50 a piece or more. Try to get it through the library or interlibrary loan. I'll ask Ginny what the story is on its availability.<br><br><br><br>
Ginny also has a website that might interest you.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.kioflife.com" target="_blank">www.kioflife.com</a>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
Joe: one word of caution: vegan+macrobiotic+crohn might equal not fulfilling all nutrional needs. Maybe it works out and even helps to fight crohn's, but Jaeska has to look carefully that all needs are met.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Wow, thanks for all the info guys! I was totally expecting posts like "well...you're screwed" or something to that effect. I think I'll look into finding a new GI and throw all this stuff at a nutritionist and see if they can come up with something doable. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
My son has crohn's. He is 16.5 years old and was diagnosed at age 10. He went from six different meds three times per day before going vegan, to 1 pill a day (6mp) within 6 months of going vegan. You are already on the right track. Take care of yourself and you'll be fine. Oh, DON'T eat popcorn!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
My son has crohn's. He is 16.5 years old and was diagnosed at age 10. He went from six different meds three times per day before going vegan, to 1 pill a day (6mp) within 6 months of going vegan. You are already on the right track. Take care of yourself and you'll be fine. Oh, DON'T eat popcorn!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
My husband has had Crohn's for 5 years now and has been vegan for 10 years. He is currently not doing very well and has tried EVERY treatment out there including clinical studies. We are constantly hearing that he should not be vegan, but we feel that it is ethically impossible for us to cross that line. I too am trying to find nutritional options for him. He is allergic to soy, dairy and eggs. I have him on a low residue diet except I can not get him enough protein, iron (etc.) with out the meat specified in that diet. he just can not tolerate the fiber right now.<br><br><br><br>
That all said, he is about to try a new "natural" approach that has been proven to put crohn's into remision in a few people. We are infecting him with hookworms. They are believed to regulate the immune system in order to survive in the gut. It sounds crazy, but it's worth a shot. Here are some links:<br><br><br><br><a href="http://community.livejournal.com/alt_allergy/8456.html" target="_blank">http://community.livejournal.com/alt_allergy/8456.html</a><br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.autoimmunetherapies.com" target="_blank">www.autoimmunetherapies.com</a>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
<p>I have had Crohns with Celiac since 2001. Ill tell you right now doctors and dieticians dont know what they are talking about with Crohns.</p>
<p>Check out <a href="http://www.gerson.org" target="_blank">www.gerson.org</a> it is amazing its a food therapy and I love it. Dont blindly follow the medical world, its been 14 years of hell and the medical world made it no easier.</p>
<p>God bless and keep your head up.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
<p><a href="http://www.gerson.org" target="_blank">www.gerson.org</a> this man has a therapy as well as a medical back ground and knowledge. You could try gently and slowly roasting the veggies and poaching the fruit to make things easier to digest.</p>
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top