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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey ya'll,

I have recently decided to eliminate meat & dairy from my diet, mainly for health reasons. I've heard for a long time that vegans/vegetarians may have difficulty maintaining an adequate supply of vitamins, nutrients, protein, & other things.

I am VERY interested in starting a detox and beginning my new life ASAP.
Are there any simple charts available that demonstrate what to eat, how often, and/or what to eat certain items with? Or a list of necessary daily values of vitamins/nutrients accompanied with foods rich in those substances?

Basically, I'm looking for a set of instructions on how to be meat/dairy free WHILE staying healthy (not just in good shape). I want to have a simple guide I can refer to at any given time and decide what I need to eat for that day.

Thank you!
 

· Ex-*****
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I'm not aware of anything like that. Just wanted to mention that you need to either take B12 supplements or be very careful to eat enough B12 fortified foods. (Supplements are probably the best option as long as you remember to take them.) Vegan foods don't naturally contain B12, and deficiency in this vitamin can be very serious (though it can take a long time to manifest itself).

As for protein, you get the best results by ensuring your overall diet contains foods from two groups: 1) legumes: beans, lentils, chickpeas, peanuts, peas etc. and products made from those (such as tofu and soya milk) and 2) rice, grains, pasta, couscous, bread etc.
 

· Rat Queen/Mouse Matriarch
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Some websites that may help...

Vegan Health: http://www.veganhealth.org/

Boston Vegan Association on nutrition: http://bostonvegan.org/nutrition

PCRM Veg Starter Kit/Guide: http://www.pcrm.org/health/veginfo/vsk/index.html

I have not had any issues with deficiencies except for vitamin D, the primary source of that being sunlight. Since I live in a climate where there isn't a whole lot of sun and I don't get out during the day much, I eat fortified foods and take a vitamin D supplement. This is just my personal experience but obtaining proper nutrients as a veg*n has not been difficult for me. Arm yourself with knowledge and tasty foods and I'm sure you'll do fine. Good luck!
 

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The whole "combining" thing was a myth that was debunked years ago. Apparently, back in the 60's or 70's, people used to think that in order to get enough protein as a veg*n, you had to eat all the elements of complete protein in the same meals. So for instance, you couldn't just eat beans in one meal and rice in another, to combine the nutritional value of both. You had to eat them together. Nutritionists have since discovered that this just isn't true.

If you're worried about nutrition, I'll give my standard recommendation of getting the book "Becoming Vegetarian" by Melina and Davis.

--Fromper
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fromper View Post

The whole "combining" thing was a myth that was debunked years ago. Apparently, back in the 60's or 70's, people used to think that in order to get enough protein as a veg*n, you had to eat all the elements of complete protein in the same meals.
--Fromper
Not just in the 60s and seventies: when I became veggie in 1986, this theory was still going strong and, when my son was moving onto solid foods in 1993, I assembled a protein combining chart to help his father establish what to feed him when I was not around! By then, it was assumed OK if you had one of each group in a combined pairing during the course of a day - so you weren't as restricted -but it was still considered a good idea nutritionally to combine proteins to achieve the right amount of complete (used to be known as second class) protein.

Even if you read about Quinoa it is marketed as the only grain which is a "complete" protein containing all the amino acids so this must be considered important enough to promote.

To be honest, even if the combining theory has been discarded it is not a bad rule of thumb to go by to have a grain with a legume - eg baked beans on toast, dahl and rice etc.It is reassuring (if nothing else) for beginners to see that old favourites work well and are used the world over.
 

· Ex-*****
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1986 View Post

Not just in the 60s and seventies: when I became veggie in 1986, this theory was still going strong and, when my son was moving onto solid foods in 1993, I assembled a protein combining chart to help his father establish what to feed him when I was not around! By then, it was assumed OK if you had one of each group in a combined pairing during the course of a day - so you weren't as restricted -but it was still considered a good idea nutritionally to combine proteins to achieve the right amount of complete (used to be known as second class) protein.

Even if you read about Quinoa it is marketed as the only grain which is a "complete" protein containing all the amino acids so this must be considered important enough to promote.

To be honest, even if the combining theory has been discarded it is not a bad rule of thumb to go by to have a grain with a legume - eg baked beans on toast, dahl and rice etc.It is reassuring (if nothing else) for beginners to see that old favourites work well and are used the world over.
Protein combining is only discarded in the sense that you don't need to combine protein sources in the same meal. It's still a pretty good idea to ensure your overall diet contains foods from each group.
 
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