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Today my Mother and I were talking about my food choices and she was asking me what I would do when I had children. I want them to be vegan; of course I don't even know what the man I marry will do as far as diet is concerned. However, veganism is important to me, so I would LIKE to marry a vegan...

My question is, when your children are not at home, how do you KEEP them vegan?! What if they go to a birthday party where cake is being served? What if an aunt takes them to McDonalds? What about when they see junk food and such at the store? I'm just curious what you do about all those situations without looking...well...fanatical.

lovenlight!

linz
 

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first and foremost, you TALK with your kids about why you are vegan. my son is six, and has been vegan since he was 16 months old. he is often invited to birthday parties and friends houses and whenever he is offered food he asks what it is made from and explains, politely, that he does not eat animal foods.

i will, however, send him with a big tray of vegan cupcakes to birthday parties, so that there is a sweet for him to enjoy and share. and most parents seem to serve hotdogs or burgers at these things, which of course are easily replaced with faux meat products. thus far, we've had no trouble.

as far as relations taking my child out to eat, they all know and understand we are vegan and that it's vitally important that they respect that choice for our kids. if they can't, they don't take my kids out. period.

not that i'm saying that you should feed your kids junk food, but there ARE vegan sweets and snacks available in almost every store. potato chips, granola bars, jelly beans, dark chocolate, etc.

the most important thing is communication and a willingness to let them choose different things from you if it comes to that. for instance, i will NEVER serve meat or dairy in my home. but if my son decided to have a slice of pizza at some kids birthday party, i'm not going to blow a gasket. he is free to make his own decisions now...i've given him all the tools and information i think he needs to make the right ones, even if they aren't in line with my own. thus far, my son has been offered non-vegan foods many times at friends' places, and each time he has declined. maybe it will stay that way. maybe he'll try it a few times. maybe he'll become an omnivore. all of that stuff is out of my hands. he is his own person.
 

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Okay. Whose parents talked to them rationally about drugs, casual sex, violence, etc.? You know how a good parent who approaches the topic in a good way CAN instill morals into a kid? I remember being 12 at a party where a joint was passed around, and I passed on it. It's because I knew smoking was wrong and would hurt someone. I'm confident the same can be true of teaching veganism.
 

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I had a discussion with Jake the other night about this... as most of you know he is omni and of course I am not. I asked him if he'd have a problem if I wanted to raise the child vegetarian. He said no, but that he also wouldn't have a problem if the child wanted meat. He also believes that the child should be able to choose for him/herself once old enough to understand. I agree. I would not try and "force" them to stay veg*n out of the home, but they would only eat veg*n at home. Then, if you have communicated well enough, the child has the ability to choose from an educated position. I don't know what age to put on that but I certainly don't believe in forcing a child to do/be anything, as they might just rebel later on and go the other way BIG time...
 

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There's also the idea that they might try meat outside of the home and be disgusted by it. I mean... Cheese is a pretty gross thing to think about if you've never had it before. "Okay, this comes out of a cow's titty. Then it gets curdled. Oh, it's best when really moldy... Okay, now you melt it, yea.. The grease means it's working..."
 

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I had an interesting discussion in class somewhat related. One of the guys who was with us is of muslim decent, I'm unsure of which branch. But he said he was raised vegetarian and never in his life has had any desire to try meat. Now it may be a culture thing, but myself being a vegetarian for 3 years and a vegan a 1 1/2 of the three, I was pretty impressed with this, even all the other girls not understanding what we ate etc. Or saying "you pour things."

As this relates to keeping children vegetarian, I'm along with everyone else. It's the childs individual choice.
 

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To add on to the previous post, when I was growing up, a friend of mine was raised on all organic, healthy foods. Some meat was included but always free range etc and it was not consumed a great deal. She would always come over to my house and eat crap hehe.

Anyways, 18 years later I'm the vegan and she's the omnivor. Funny how life turns out.
 

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Your kids can come to my house Linz, I'll make 'em some good vegan food! Seriously though, it's one of those things where you need people to support you and respect your decision and how you choose to raise your kids. There are many ways of handling things, and being a good parental role model is one of the most important.
 

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*Now* we've got a question. I suppose you would simply feed vegetarian food in your home.. Same as you would feed any slant of food preference. If the kids want and are used to pepperoni pizza when they go to the mall... There isn't too much you can do to stop them. You'd just have to teach them about vegetarianism in the home and hope they pick up on some of what you're saying. Of course, with foster kids, you'd be wanting to build a strong relationship, not turn them off because "man, my new mom is some crazy hippie lady." Tricky!
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by CharityAJO

Cheese is a pretty gross thing to think about if you've never had it before. "Okay, this comes out of a cow's titty. Then it gets curdled. Oh, it's best when really moldy... Okay, now you melt it, yea.. The grease means it's working..."
LMAO!! I'm going to re-read this anytime I get a cheese craving!

My step-sister grew up in a vegan house. She ate meat and cheese every chance she got when she was away from home. Of course that doesn't mean that every kid will react that way, but it's one of the possibilities.

If I were a parent I would take Kreeli's attitude: keep the home vegan, provide lots of information, provide lots of fun vegan treats both at home and for taking with them wherever they go ... and then it's up to them.

I'd definitely emphasize the vegan treats and junk food, especially if ethical reasons are your primary ones. A vegan diet is still healthier overall, and having only "yucky" food at home will drive the kid to grab some eggs-and-dairy cake or cookies. My step-sister's mom used to try to feed us carob cakes and tofu and other stuff that we hated. There was no "real candy" in the house, vegan or otherwise.
 

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my husband is into "optimal" diets. It's very annoying, because he thinks that the "optimal" diet includes meat. He says that my ovo-vegetarian diet is "healthy" but not "optimal." of course, he's full of crap. It can be "optimal" if well done, and occassionally i can get him to agree to that.

i told him that when/if we have children, i would like them to be vegetarian. If, when they are older (and have been educated as Kreeli mentioned), they decide that they want to eat meat, then that is fine with me. It is their free choice. But explaining why i made the choices that i made is also important.

If our kids were foster kids,it may be another matter. If i had them since infancy, but there was the chance of giving them back, i'd probably raise them vegetarian as long as i could, educating them on my choices (particularly once they got to 3 or 4 years old and would start to understand the choices). If i was fostering a kid who was already an omnivore, i would likely let them continue being an omnivore (my omnivore husband taking care of the meat and such), though dairy free (neither of us consumes dairy). Again, educating them about my choices.

That's basicly the way to go: education.

The more difficult hurdle is seeing if my husband would agree as to their diets.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by CharityAJO

There's also the idea that they might try meat outside of the home and be disgusted by it. I mean... Cheese is a pretty gross thing to think about if you've never had it before. "Okay, this comes out of a cow's titty. Then it gets curdled. Oh, it's best when really moldy... Okay, now you melt it, yea.. The grease means it's working..."
I quoted that to my mum today.. when she asked what was wrong with cheese!! Shut her up quickly.. And Im so glad I read that yesterday!

LMAO!!!!

Danny
 

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In that situation I would do as has been suggested; keep the food at home vegan and let the child make choices outside the home. That way they have the choice so there's nothing to rebel against! I would get them to take some vegan food along to parties etc though, just to show people it isn't all lentils and tofu.
 

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This is a very interesting post. I am 7 months pregnant and the only person in my family that's vegan ( or vegaterian for that matter). My fear is that my family is going to undermind my decision to raise him vegan when I am not around. My mom has put her foot down and is going to nanny him, so I quess I should start by really sitting down and having a heart to heart with her about how serious I am about this life choice. Still though, they think I'm an earthy, tree-huggin' , veggie-lovin' weirdo. I'm not really sure how it's going to work. Anyway, thanks for listening (reading) my little "rant."

-Journey The Poet
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by rainbowmoon

However, veganism is important to me, so I would LIKE to marry a vegan...

My question is, when your children are not at home, how do you KEEP them vegan?!
I will make t-shirts and that kind of things with a text. The text says what the child may not have and what they may have.


If they are at school and that sort of things then you give the school or the people around the children a note with what the child may not have.

I don't have any children yet. I still looking for the perfect vegetarian or vegan woman. We can decide with eachother how strict we will be for the children. Meat/fish will be strictly forbidden, but maybe some candy or a cookie is not so bad, I think.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by CharityAJO

There's also the idea that they might try meat outside of the home and be disgusted by it. I mean... Cheese is a pretty gross thing to think about if you've never had it before. "Okay, this comes out of a cow's titty. Then it gets curdled. Oh, it's best when really moldy... Okay, now you melt it, yea.. The grease means it's working..."
My my that made my day
Next time anyone asks me what's wrong with "just a little cheese" --BAM!-- titty-story time
Thanks, Charity!
 

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Actually what really grosses me out more than the titty thing is the whole rennet explanation. What it is, how they get it, where it comes from. Gawd!! No wonder some cheeses smell like puke.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by MsRuthieB

No wonder some cheeses smell like puke.
Hehe, I made a mock-parmesan thingy yesterday, and I got a whiff of it and I was like "ah, and it doesn't even smell like vomit!"
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by MsRuthieB

Actually what really grosses me out more than the titty thing is the whole rennet explanation. What it is, how they get it, where it comes from.
Good point. I've said this before: when I learned about rennet I felt like I'd never even been a vegetarian in the first place.
 
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