VeggieBoards banner

1 - 20 of 86 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
19,873 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This thread is for the vegetarians who would like to try (no Yoda quotes please!) going vegan on 1/1.<br><br><br><br>
I guess until then we can introduce ourselves (again) and tell what, if anything, we're doing to prepare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
*stands at podium*<br><br><br><br>
Hello everybody. My name is Rogue and I... I... I'm a vegaholic.<br><br><br><br>
*sob*<br><br><br><br>
I once thought I could control my addiction, but I soon discovered I was just fooling myself. I came here seeking help for my addiction, and I've found it in all you wonderful people. With your guidance... and recipes... I hope to fully realize my dreams of Veganism. Together we can be healthy, happy and well fed. Thank you.<br><br><br><br>
*takes bow and departs from podium to sound of thunderous applause*<br><br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/blush.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":eek:"> Sorry... got a bit carried away there. I'm better now... really...
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
19,873 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Ok, here's my story. I've been a vegetarian for just over 4 years. Would like to go vegan. Have half-heartedly tried several times, usually for a week but the most recent attempt was two weeks.<br><br><br><br>
It's fairly difficult because I eat out a lot and to be honest I love the taste of certain non-vegan foods. To add to my frustration, I can't cook. It's not just that I don't cook, I <b>can't</b> cook. Usually when I try making something at home I end up throwing it away. So I have no will power and I'm easily discouraged. Not a good combination.<br><br><br><br>
Regardless of wether or not I actually pull it off I've decided that I want to eat healthier, more fruits and veggies, less dairy. At the very least I'd like to go three weeks eating vegan, then next time try four. I know that's not a good mindset going into this but I'm doing this for myself and I'm trying to be realistic. It's something that I have to feel comfortable with and even if I can't stick with it, every week that I do helps. And the longer I go the easier it will be and the less I'll crave non-vegan items during my relapses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,691 Posts
well i'm < > that far from total veganism, i just have to quit buying packaged foods that have teeny amounts of dairy byproducts. i've been doing pretty good lately so shouldn't be difficult. i'm still learning of things that aren't vegan like additives and whatnot, and cutting them as i go.<br><br><br><br>
but yep i'm going to aim for total veganism for the new year <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,451 Posts
michael:<br><br><br><br>
have you considered that it may not be in your best interest to become vegan yet?<br><br><br><br>
i mean, if you can't/don't cook, if you don't/cant get a lot of variety from eating out or whatever, and you do like certain tastes (and perhaps even then for health reasons), then why not just go ahead and be ovo-lacto or ovo or lacto vegetarian?<br><br><br><br>
it's really not a bad thing. Vegans aren't better than vegetarians and they aren't healthier necessarily and it's not like they have a better handle or perspective on animal issues than vegetarians do. Fact is, they just have a different diet to espouse their beliefs.<br><br><br><br>
the reason i bring this up is because you struggle with it so much. Or so it seems. Basicly, it's like you're beating yourself up for not being vegan, you struggle to be vegan, and you kinda beat yourself up for not being vegan for a long enough stretch of time.<br><br><br><br>
this just doens't seem healthy.<br><br><br><br>
When i became vegan, it was a process, but it was one that i could live with. it wasn't a struggle to cut out animal products and it hasn't been a struggle to stay away from those products. There are times when i must choose between vegetarian and starving and i will eat those things--but i don't feel guilty about it either. It seems that you're experiencing just the opposite of my expeirence.<br><br><br><br>
you can be satisfied with you diet--vegetarian or vegan. and you know what? That's OK.<br><br><br><br>
anyway, it's just something to think about. i'm not trying to discourage you entirely. i think it would be great if you became vegan, but it's better to become vegan fort he right reasons and at the right time rather than trying to force it and being frustrated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
I have been a lacto-ovo vegetarian for going on 2 years. I too am looking to go Vegan 1/1/02. I have made a lot of changes in my life over the past two years and I don't plan on stopping now. The only thing that will be hard for me, is using household items that are not Vegan. My family is total against my views and I would have to by everything seperate. But you know what, I will not be turned back. I will overcome!! Good luck to everyone and I will talk again soon. L8R X
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
19,873 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
zoebird -<br><br><br><br>
Even though I'm not sure I'll ever be able to stick to it I do want to keep trying. Even if I only do it for a week I feel better physically and mentally and I feel as though I'm contributing in my own little way.<br><br><br><br>
It is something that I want to do, I'm not doing it out of an overwhelming sense of guilt or anything. I just have issues, primarily the inability to cook and lack of will power. Eventually I will overcome them. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
Michael, God knows I'm not much of a cook, I get bored and I'm absent minded, but how hard is it? You bung a load of nice things in a pot, they come out tasting nice. I never cook complicated things, but I don't starve and even the husband likes some of my efforts. Have you worked out why you can't cook? Where's the problem? It's easier than learning to drive for sure, and easier than algebra, and easier than all the computer stuff you do.<br><br>
My mum's tequnique for cooking was to cook the same dish over and over until it was perfect, then move on. Maybe that's why I'm not into it. But 10 minutes or so gives you a nice meal, it's quicker than queuing in a restaurant. You could be vegan at home and lacto out, at first, if you find it hard to socialise and not be selfconscious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
michael, if you are not comfortable in the kitchen, checkout<br><br><a href="http://www.viva.org.uk/Viva" target="_blank">http://www.viva.org.uk/Viva</a>!Guides/l-plate/vegan/index.htm<br><br><br><br>
which may help.<br><br>
why do you want to go vegan anyway? if health is the issue, well you can eat healthily as an omnivore, vegetarian or vegan. (equally, you can eat unhealthily as an omnivore, vegetarian or vegan.<br><br><br><br>
if you want to become vegan because you have become aware of the suffering involved in the commercial production of dairy produce, well, that should help, next time you are eating out. are there no veggie places where you live and work - or are they just inconvenient for you.<br><br><br><br>
it comes down to motivation. not being good in the kitchen, or not having convenient vegan food to hand, just does not cut it, michael. wake up, this is the lot of the many vegans. yet people do make the effort.<br><br><br><br>
if you are happy with just cutting down on your dairy produce, thats fine, you are making a great contribution to reducing the suffering of animals (and may, as a side-product, keep your heart a little healthier) But the "i can't cook" or "there's nowhere i can eat out as a vegan" excuses are just that, excuses.<br><br><br><br>
nice board by the way <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"><br><br><br><br><br><br>
xvictim, ladyfaile: good luck to you both in the new year! don't worry if you have the occasional set back. it happens. after a while it becomes natural and fun, honest!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,645 Posts
Michael--<br><br><br><br>
Have you read Vegetarian Times?<br><br><br><br>
Every month, the mag includes at least 5 main-course dishes that can be made in 30 minutes or less. Really, these are fool proof. Start out with these easy dishes and then gradually build up your repertoire. Also, the food's dang tasty.<br><br><br><br>
Many libraries carry the magazine, too.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
19,873 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I bought a copy a couple of years ago but haven't really looked at one since. I think we've determined that the majority of my problem is that I don't follow the recipe and I tend to improvise too much. People who know how to cook can do that and get away with it, people who have no clue what they're doing can't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,451 Posts
i thought of something else to help out with the cooking problem:<br><br><br><br>
cooking classes<br><br><br><br>
i'm not talking about university classes or anything, but i know that in my university town, there were a couple of people who taught vegetarian cooking classes for free (or for the cost of the food--that is, you bought your own ingredients).<br><br><br><br>
if there isn't anyone in your area who does this, thenperhaps you could--through your club--find a person who is a pretty decent vegan/vegetarian cook and they could offer cooking classes. You could check out local public middle and high schools to see if they'll let you use their home-ec rooms (and they may even let you do it for free, but it usually includes a rental cost).<br><br><br><br>
Or, you could do it at someone's house and cook together. this may help you get the hang of things. . .and then you'll know how to cook. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,684 Posts
Okey dokey... since I'm not a huge boards-surfer and pretty much only go back to the ones that I've posted on before, it's taken me awhile to find this place.<br><br><br><br>
So here I am! I'm going to try going vegan on the new year, also. I haven't told my family yet so I don't know if my mom will freak out or thank me.<br><br><br><br>
My main problem is overindulging on desserts, most of which are lacto. If I don't eat any of the lacto desserts by being vegan, most of my health issues are taken care of. I mean, yeah, I can still eat most of the food I love, but I won't be eating any of the stuff I shouldn't be eating so much of anyway.<br><br><br><br>
Do any already-vegans have any other tips for going vegan? Do you always pack your lunch, or does your workplace/school provide enough vegan options for you? Was it hard to explain what you were doing to your family?<br><br><br><br>
Another big thing: I have a lot of birthdays in my family in January. Some of the birthday parties will be held at my aunt's house. This is the aunt that I've always had trouble with over being vegetarian. I can't imagine what it would be like to be vegan at her house. It would only be one meal, but should I risk it and bring my own food? Or volunteer to make the salad? What they usually have for family birthday parties is some kind of pasta/spaguetti sauce/cheese thing, like stuffed shells. How do I say, "No, I'm not going to take advantage of your hospitality and I'll just eat salad minus the shredded cheese. And no, I'm not having cake and ice cream, either."<br><br><br><br>
The situation might take care of itself because I might have to work the same evening as the party. I like seeing my extended family, but it can be SO HARD when they try to coerce me into eating things they know darn well I have ethical objections to eating. It's one thing to not understand, but it's another thing to not even provide any recourse for vegetarians.<br><br><br><br>
Shalom,<br><br><br><br>
Skylark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
good luck to everyone trying to make the switch from veggie to vegan!!!<br><br><br><br>
and zoebird...vegans R better than lacto ovo veggies, just ask the dairy cows, their slaughtered babies, and hens...they'll tell you how it goes, who's the better of the 2. sorry, but it is the trutH. get over it, and move on. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> dont ask the got milk people though...they'll tell u how much you need all that animal fat and protein covered calcium that ur body cant absorb...how ur body needs all that milky extra muscus...<br><br><br><br>
now, im vegan, and cook i can if i wanted to but hardly do. the only foods i cook on a regular basis r legums and grains--i made a couple cups of black beens yesturday...that's my cooking for most of the week!!! what is really easy...just throw together whatever types of beans...sometimes i tvp torwards the end. so, screw cooking classes, screw cook books, diy!! diy!!! diy!!! if i cook anything more complicated it's somew sortta stir-fry--eaaaassssyyy. the less u cook, the more raw veggie one consumes, the healthier, the better. so when it comes to eating raw veggies--take my aunts advice--"cook by colors"...u know, just chop up whatever looks pretty, throw on a simple dressing...a shiznitz of jalepenos (imo)...and vwala. then again im a lazy ass, and when i got the munchies, it's throw a potatoe in the microwave, throw salad and salsa on top and grub it!! remember peanut butter goes well with like n e fruit (and celery of course!!!).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,451 Posts
skylark:<br><br><br><br>
you ask some good and important questions--mostly about how to get along well with your family and other basic social issues.<br><br><br><br>
As for school/work, i always pack a lunch of some sort. Sometimes it's a vegan frozen meal (something from Amy's Kitchen perhaps) or leftovers or something that i whipped up for lunch. i also carry lots of my own snacks so that i'm never caught without food. Most of my snacks are raw foods such as fruit or nuts. they tend to keep without refridgeration and i can leave them at work or in the car for a couple of days without any problems.<br><br><br><br>
As for the home issue--and birthdays and the like--i mostly fend for myself here too. I usually make enough for everyone to share and it's rarely a salad. My father in law's birthday is in january and we always have a party for him. His favorite meal is lasagne and then cake and ice cream. Since they never make salads (they aren't fond of veggies, prefer starches), i always make one. Also, i make a vegan lasagne to take with me for them to try out too. They never do, but i make the gesture.<br><br><br><br>
I know that some aunts/uncles/grandparents/parents can be very particular about their kitchens and their meals. It's "their gift" and if you bring your own you're basicly taking over "their gift" AND saying that "their gift" isn't good enough. But you know what? You aren't responsible for how other people act or respond. THey have their weirdness and psychosis. And it's not egotistical to be yourself and to go ahead and forgo certain foods because you want to. You can also tell these relatives that you are very thankful for their gifts and all the love that they show you, even though you choose not to eat what they prepare. Gratitude goes a long way--and i'm sure you have a lot to be thankful for.<br><br><br><br>
Also, you don't have to jump in and volunteer lots of information when you go to these functions. When you make your vegan stuffed shells or your vegan lasagne or whatever, you can just say "i brought this along" or "i thought i'd try this" or even "i thought you might like this recipe." You don't even have to say that it's vegan. Some people may know, and some may not. And when they ask if you're having desert, just say "no thanks" and don't bother to explain or anything else. Just be polite and be yourself.<br><br><br><br>
Attitude--a good one--goes a long way. So, if you're happy, positive, and respectful of not only what you're doing but of what others are doing around you and for you, then you'll be fine. It's ok to be different, but you don't have to call too much attention to yourself.<br><br><br><br>
as for deserts that are vegan--there are many! many! many! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> i'm sure you'll find plenty of good cake and other dessert recipes online and around. I have a few myself that i'm looking forward to trying out this holiday season. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> Also, soy delicious and rice dream are great "ice creams"--i love the mint chocolate swirl! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"> i don't get it often, only as a special treat and usually only when we have guests. It's a nice treat!<br><br><br><br>
So, i hope that helps. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
Mice:<br><br><br><br>
actually, it is possible to be as ethical as an ovo-lacto as a vegan in the ways that you alluded too. There are ways of procuring both milk and egg products that do not involve battery cages and ultimate slaughter of chickens, adult female milking cows, or their children--which, of course, i alluded to in my original post.<br><br><br><br>
There are farmers who raise milking cattle (or goats) and are very ethical about both the treatment of the milking animals and their offspring. In some cases, the milk is not collected until after the babies have fed. some chickens actually are free range and are well cared for as pets. Personally, i see no ethical problem with aquiring eggs or milk from these sources.<br><br><br><br>
A vegan generally chooses to not participate in modern animal agriculture because of the general treatment of battery hens, milking cows and their offspring. Understandable. the conditions are often horrible and it does lead to the eventual slaughter of animals. But, if the conditions are not horrible and the animals will not be slaughtered, then there is little difference between this consciencious ovo-lacto diet and a vegan diet. In both cases, animals are not harmed.<br><br><br><br>
some vegans then might even become ovo-lacto vegetarians if the conditions were like this categorically. But, they aren't, so we all have work to do. Of course, other vegans wouldn't become ovo-lacto vegetarians because they take the idea about not-harming animals a step farther by saying that even owning, raising, or using animals in this way is harming them. I think this is an acceptable, but extreme, position. It is also not a position that i hold. THese vegans, even if conditions were better or are better for some animals, still would not/will not consume these products. I find that acceptable as well. and for some vegans, there are multiple reasons for becoming vegan--including personal, biological ones that do not necessarily apply to other people.<br><br><br><br>
in my area, it is possible for me to acquire eggs and milk products from humane farmers. I know many people with pet chickens or free range chickens. I know a few people with their own goats and cows and their own cheese making capabilities. For most of these people, the joy of raising and caring for these animals is a large part of their lives. The animals are happy and well cared for. and my friends recieve the benefits of milk and egg products. I choose to not consume these products because of lactose intolerance. I find it more difficult to turn down the eggs--as i have always liked eggs and really have no problem with the treatment of these chickens. But, as it is, i do not eat the eggs simply because i find it difficult to "keep" them and use them effectively. And to be honest, i enjoy my vegan recipes more than having to figure out what to do with eggs that i can't already do with tofu. Basicly, my life has changed and i'm happy with it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"><br><br><br><br>
I also have to say that many ovo-lacto vegetarians who are not so careful about where their foods come from are not necessarily "unethical" either. In fact, most ethics have multiple, reasonable conclusions. Simply because it is not a conclusion that i would reach does not mean that it is unreasonable or wrong--just different. That is not to say that all conclusions are right either. In fact, some conclusions are wrong--even when they are reasonable.<br><br><br><br>
One conclusion that i think is generally wrong is to consider one's own way as categorically "the best" way or "the only" way, when in fact it is more closely "the best way for ME in THIS CIRCUMSTANCE."<br><br><br><br>
and, btw, i AM vegan. And that's the truth, so get over yourself and move on. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,763 Posts
My personal experience with changing food habits is that making changes that are small changes, but which I intend to have last indefinitly, gets better results than making changes that I try to maintain for a small amount of time. Instead of trying to maintain a vegan diet for longer and longer periods, I would tend, according to what has worked for me, to just make one tiny change in my diet, that brings it just a tiny bit closer to veganism -- but make the change permanent. For example just stop one kind of cheese. Find all kinds of things that make you happy (not nec in the area of food, but most likely) that you can do instead, whenever a thought pops up that you want such a cheese, and you have trouble forgetting the thought. By tge way, isn't it funny how things we wan;t to remember, we often have trouble remembering, and things we don't want to pop into our miind, pop in, and we can't get rid of them?<br><br><br><br>
I think you will need to learn to do some food prepareation yourself. Unless you can afford to hire a private chef for yourself of a group of people like yourself. I don't thnk there is any way around this.<br><br>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
Wow great advice here. Especially liked zoebird's early comments to Mike.<br><br><br><br>
Anyhow. Good luck to everyone. In order for it work in me I just really had to have a shift in thinking. Oh, I thought about it for awhile and did it for a year and then was back to ovo-lacto for a year. It's a LOT harder than going vegetarian, but if you can find foods you love and not consider it denying yourself then go for it!<br><br><br><br>
And mike. Really, I have lots of free time this winter break. Why don't we hook something up? We can go shopping and Jeremy and I will come over and see what we can do and you can come over here. Open arms, buddy. We'll be your personal support team.<br><br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
And again to everyone else. GO FOR IT!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,645 Posts
It's hard at first (maybe for the first couple of years?!?) but then it becomes very EASY.<br><br><br><br>
Yes, go slow. It sounds like everyone here has just a few main places where veganism might be a problem (lunch at work and family gatherings). Start out just being vegan everywhere except those places (when I made the switch, I decided to go vegan at all times in my life except when I ate out--and gradually I weeded out my non-vegan practices).<br><br><br><br>
As far as eating at work, yes I pack every day. Occasionally, I don't have time or forget my lunch and have to eat some of the nasty sides at the school cafeteria or I grab a T.Bell bean burrito (although I hate to give them my business), but it's just one meal and you have to make do. They're not real healthy, but there's plenty of vegan convenience foods out there now if you want to go that route.<br><br><br><br>
Family events are tougher. Even after I went full-fledged, die hard vegan, there were still those moments when someone made something especially for me and I just could not refuse it. Yes, it's tough and can be embarrassing or seem ungrateful to make your point of view known, but I think the only option is just to go for it. It's got to happen sooner or later. Be honest and tell them what you're up to. Ideally, call them up BEFORE the event and just explain yourself as politely as you can. I still call my folks before Thansgiving to ask them if I can bring anything and subtley clarify/remind them of my dietary choices. Again, it's hard at first, but eventually, at least in my experience, people just accept it and move on. In time, it will cease to be an issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,684 Posts
I love you people! Thanks SO MUCH for the suggestions!<br><br><br><br>
LOL I can just imagine the look on my aunt and grandma's face when I turn down cake and ice cream! I have one of the biggest sweeth teeth (tooths?) around and would never pass up dessert-- unless, of course, I'm vegan now and the dessert isn't vegan.<br><br><br><br>
Do ya think I could email my aunt now and ask when my cousin's birthday party will be, or would that be too ahead of time? Her birthday is Janauary 6th, and the party ususally would be the Sunday before or after.<br><br><br><br>
And beautifulvegan, yes, I was surprised. I was surprised to see that you misspelled 'surprise'... but hey I'm not really picky... just if you wanted it to be 100% accurate...<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Shalom,<br><br><br><br>
Skylark
 
1 - 20 of 86 Posts
Top