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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know if there's a compilation out there of vegan foods that you'd find in the regular grocery store? Like what kinds of cereals are vegan. what kinds of rice mixes, etc? It'd be easier than deciphering the ingredient lists. Also, I know to look for the basics like milk, egg, whey powder, etc. but are there other ingredients that are used that you wouldn't be able to identify as non-vegan if you didn't already know? Like, I saw I think it was stearoyl lactylate? I'm not sure exactly, but the "lactyl" made me think milk. Also, what exactly does "Natural and Artifical Flavors" mean? How are you supposed to decipher that? Is my Cookie Crisp cereal vegan?

Thanks Bunches!
 

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well, PeTA has a list (of dubious quality) of ingredients found in processed foods that aren't vegan. check their site, in the "compasionate shopper" section. it's quite long, and soilman has often explained that many of the things they list can, indeed, be vegan, although PeTA doesn't say so. soilman is also a wealth of information here at VB, so i'm sure he'll have something to say about it.

one thing i learned is that ingredients that say "lactic" or something similar aren't often of animal origin. lactic acid can form in some fruits and vegetables (like pickles and olives) during the fermenting process, naturally.

as for cookie crisp....ew! maybe you should try experimenting with some of the less processed foods that are available. whole grain, organic breakfast cereals have got to be better for you than that junk!


my general rule when shopping is, the fewer ingredients it has, the better it is for you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I can't give much help, because my grocery list basically stays the same. Natural and Artificial Flavors can be vegan, meat based, other, if your unsure of the source of a ingredient, write the company. Also, do you consider sugar vegan? I remember not being able to buy products because they weren't vegan, by refined sugar. It may clarify what you'll eat and won't, for other board members. I use to write the name of the ingredient down, if I was unsure of it's veganality, and later check into it on the net. PETA's Caring Consumer book has a list of ingredients, and may be a good investment. Sorry, I can't give much help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm not really familiar with the whole sugar situation. I know that there are some sugars that have something to do with bone char, and wine too, right? But I don't really know how the stuff is processed or what kinds of sugar and wine is processed this way. As far as the Cookie Crisp goes...I know it's got a million strange chemical ingredients in it, but I'm not vegetarian (or maybe vegan soon) for my health. I made the choice to be veggie for moral reasons only, and the associated health benefits are just an extra. I was raised "meat and potatoes", and was allowed to eat whatever junk food I wanted. As a result, I'm about 35 lbs overweight...and that's the lowest weight I've ever been. I keep trying to make myself like stuff like brown rice and whole wheat bread, but my super-processed upbringing keeps screwing me up. It's not that I don't want to eat better, it's just that I don't want to eat stuff that doesn't taste good. I'm a foodaholic, and I've gotta have my sweet stuff and my chocolatey stuff, and my greasy fried stuff.

That's one aspect of veganism that's really hard for me to think about doing...all the chocolate candies and brownies and chocolate chip cookies, cakes, etc. aren't vegan!

It just seems so daunting. Why is it that vegetarianism seemed to come so easily to me, but veganism is like pulling teeth?
 

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Keep in mind that this is a process. You shouldn't worry about being perfect from the get-go. I've had to pare away stuff from my grocery trips on an ongoing basis ever since becoming vegan overnight. Start with the obvious stuff, and cut out things as you learn about them. Meantime, keep adding new things.

I recommend buying as many of the best vegan cookbooks (and treats cookbooks) as you can find. As I've learned various recipes, I've gotten a better sense of what's "vegan kosher" and how to combine things in new ways, as well as how to prepare foods I never ate before becoming vegan. It takes time, so be patient with yourself.
 
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