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_\t<a href="http://channels.netscape.com/ns/news/story.jsp?floc=FF-APO-rontz&idq=/ff/story/0002%2F20030204%2F145452642.htm&sc=rontz&photoid=20030123BEJ103" target="_blank">http://channels.netscape.com/ns/news...20030123BEJ103</a><br><br><br><br>
By Randy Fabi<br><br><br><br>
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - About 60 percent of the largest U.S. meat plants failed to meet federal food safety regulations for preventing the E. coli bacteria in their products, the U.S. Agriculture Department said on Tuesday.<br><br><br><br>
With proposed record level funding for its food safety programs in fiscal 2004, USDA said it would begin imposing the "next generation of enforcement" on the U.S. meat industry as part of its "war against E. coli."<br><br><br><br>
"We are doing everything possible to prevent outbreaks of E. coli in the summer, certainly to prevent these large recalls that we've had," USDA Undersecretary Elsa Murano told reporters.<br><br><br><br>
In September, the department ordered all U.S. beef slaughter and grinding plants to reexamine their food safety systems after inspectors discovered E. coli was more prevalent in meat than previously thought.<br><br><br><br>
A preliminary review of these reassessments found 60 percent of 35 large meat plants not meeting federal food safety regulations.<br><br><br><br>
"They were scientific and design issues and not direct food safety issues," said Garry McKee, administrator for USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service. USDA said many plants could not verify that their food safety systems were adequate.<br><br><br><br>
E. coli O157:H7, typically acquired through contaminated food or water, causes bloody diarrhea, vomiting and cramps. In some cases, usually involving elderly or young children, it can lead to kidney failure and death.<br><br><br><br>
PLANTS GIVEN 30-DAY NOTICE<br><br><br><br>
McKee said the department has notified the plants to fix the problem within 30 days. Meat companies are also being told add at least one safeguard in their food safety systems that will reduce the risk of E. coli.<br><br><br><br>
The strain of bacteria causes an estimated 73,000 infections and 61 deaths in the United States each year, according to government data. It is destroyed when meat is cooked to at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit.<br><br><br><br>
Caroline Smith DeWaal, food safety director for the Center for Science in the Public Interest, said USDA's findings proved that companies were not effectively implementing mandated food safety programs.<br><br><br><br>
The White House on Monday proposed an $899 million budget for food safety, hoping to repair its image after a series of massive meat recalls last year. The recalls, which caused more than 100 illnesses and a handful of deaths, involved such large meat producers as Smithfield Foods Inc., ConAgra Foods Inc., Pilgrim's Pride Corp. and privately held Cargill.<br><br><br><br>
The proposal includes funding to increase the number of meat inspectors to 7,680 and double the number of E. coli tests at ground beef plants.<br><br><br><br>
USDA said about $18 million would be used to establish the Office of Food Security and Emergency Preparedness. It will coordinate with the Homeland Security Department and other federal agencies to prevent deliberate attacks against the U.S. food supply.<br><br><br><br>
The Bush administration's budget proposal now goes to Congress. Fiscal 2004 begins on Oct. 1, 2003.
 

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If people would know how and in with circumstances there food is made, they wouldn't eat half of it.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>1vegan</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
If people would know how and in with circumstances there food is made, they wouldn't eat half of it.</div>
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Yes, I found out WAY too much when I worked at Tyson. I quit eating chicken soon after I started working there. After I found out that the rest of the factory farming industry was just as bad, I swore off all meat completely, <span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><i>forever</i></b></span>. Nasty, just nasty. I know WAY too much to EVER eat it again, even if I didn't have a problem with killing the animals for their flesh. (Which, of course, I do.) <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/spew.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":spew:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>cyberactivist</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Yes, I found out WAY too much when I worked at Tyson. I quit eating chicken soon after I started working there. After I found out that the rest of the factory farming industry was just as bad, I swore off all meat completely, <span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><i>forever</i></b></span>. Nasty, just nasty. I know WAY too much to EVER eat it again, even if I didn't have a problem with killing the animals for their flesh. (Which, of course, I do.) <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/spew.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":spew:"></div>
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I know what you mean... it's unspeakable! Blech. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/lipsrsealed2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":sealed:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>RedStarJedi</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><br>
The White House on Monday proposed an $899 million budget for food safety, hoping to repair its image after a series of massive meat recalls last year. The recalls, which caused more than 100 illnesses and a handful of deaths, involved such large meat producers as Smithfield Foods Inc., ConAgra Foods Inc., Pilgrim's Pride Corp. and privately held Cargill</div>
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yay. More tax dollars wasted because of the animal industries.<br><br><br><br>
I wonder how many starving people in third world nations $900,000,000 could feed?<br><br><br><br>
How about taxing companies that violate health regulations, or "supply bad meat" huge amounts? 20 people sick from e.coli. from your contaminated animal flesh products? $100,000 fine per person sick.
 
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