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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.wnyt.com/x10549.xml?ag=x995&sb=x183

200+ safe with reputable rescuers, Advocates for Game Farm Animals, and Friends of Catskill Game Farm. Boom-Boom the female white rhino (over 30 years old) was purchased by rescuers from the winning bidder, a canned hunt operator, for nearly double her bid price. Louise the 4-year-old warthog (in the photo) and Rusty (~20 years old) move to a private, upstate-NY sanctuary.
 

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I was curious how many didn't get rescued, since there were a lot more than those listed...

http://timesunion.com/AspStories/sto...ate=10/25/2006

Quote:
Group blasts animal auction

Humane Society alleges unlicensed buyers, filthy conditions at game farm sale

By DAN HIGGINS, Staff writer

First published: Wednesday, October 25, 2006

The Humane Society of the United States is calling for a federal investigation of the Oct. 18 auction at the Catskill Game Farm, claiming that at least two unlicensed buyers purchased animals.

The animal protection group also said the conditions at the Game Farm were unsanitary, and that many animals for sale were filthy and malnourished. Some animals were found dead in their pens the day of the auction, the group claims.

It also pressed its case that many of the animals sold will wind up as trophies on walls or at "canned shoots," where hunters pay to shoot animals on fenced-in property.

...

The Catskill Game Farm closed earlier this month after 73 years in business. The owners hired a Michigan auction company to sell off close to 1,000 animals including exotic birds, sheep, alligators and monkeys.

In a letter to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the society said at least two of the bidders who purchased animals did so illegally because of revoked or contested licenses. One bidder, a man who bought 10 alligators, illegally transported them back to his property in Pennsylvania by placing them loose in the back of his sport utility vehicle, the animal protection group alleged.

Their accusations come from witness accounts of the Oct. 18 auction and Internet searches on some of the buyers.

The Humane Society's claims contradict the assurances given by the Catskill Game Farm, whose owner, Kathie Schulz, told the public that buyers were screened and the animals were going to "good homes."

...

She did acknowledge that once the animals left the game farm, anything could happen to them, including winding up on a hunting preserve or on a taxidermists' table. While that wouldn't be illegal in many states, including New York, the thought horrifies people who grew up going to the Catskill Game Farm and hand-feeding some of the animals.

Andrew Page, a Humane Society official who investigates canned hunts, named at least one man at the auction who identifies himself as a trophy hunter. Victor Hollender, who purchased fallow deer and yak, advertises "trophy hunts year-round" on his business card, Page said. That's not illegal. But Page pointed out that Hollender was the man who originally bought the white rhinoceros Boom Boom for $5,500. Hollender then sold the rhino to ecko unltd., a clothing company that plans to place Boom Boom and Jack, the game farm's other rhino, at a sanctuary or zoo.

Hollender couldn't be located for comment. But the Humane Society wants the USDA to investigate all his purchases because, they said, his license as an animal dealer was not valid. They cited online records showing he was disciplined by the USDA in 2000 for dealing animals without a license.

Another buyer, Bodie Knapp of Wayne's World Safari in eastern Texas, also came under scrutiny. The Humane Society points to a USDA decision to revoke his license to deal in animals last year. Two calls to Knapp's business in Texas went unanswered.

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No matter how good the intentions of the game farm's owners, he said, there was never any way to guarantee the animals would go to "good homes."

"There was no basis in making that promise," he said.
I also see in a communication that one of the hippos got auctioned off to a hunting farm, to be penned until she gets a bounty put on her head. Apparently a vet is trying to buy her from them, but no word on that.
 

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more...

Quote:
...some of the auction bidders may have been fronting for canned

hunt operations, which are illegal in some states. One dealer,

representing an organization that promotes trophy animals available

year round, paid over $15,000 for fallow deer and red deer - common

trophy animals. The dealer in question has been previously charged

with operating without a license on 22 separate occasions. In 2002,

the dealer was arrested by Texas game wardens for transporting

undocumented white-tail deer into Texas. He pleaded guilty and was

fined $11,500...

A group of biologists, veterinarians, animal welfare advocates, and

sanctuary operators mobilized to purchase many of the higher risk

animals at auction. Their purchases included Nilgai, Aoudad, a

Southern White Rhino and the highest animal sale of the day, a

Warthog. A buyer wishing to remain anonymous said, The approach of

buying animals to save them from canned hunts is neither ideal nor

sustainable. The optimal solution would have been for the Schulzs to

have worked with our organizations to ensure the placement of these

animals in accredited sanctuary facilities. In the end, only less than

20 percent of these animals were placed.
For the remainder, and for

thousands of exotics born and sold in this country, their only hope is

legislation stopping this barbaric process.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
HSUS and AGFA both knew that canned hunt operators would have--and did have--fronts at the auction, and a known fact that despite Schultz's assurances prior to the auction that she would not allow animals to go to known operators, she did little if anything to keep these people out of the bid process. Below is a quote from an AGFA coalition member in reference to Boom-Boom the rhino, saved by Marc Ecko:
The guy who originally purchased one of them was our main contender in the warthog bidding. One of the reporters covering the sale came up to me later and said she overheard one guy saying to him "that is going to be a very expensive trophy". There were certainly a lot of seedy looking characters in attendance.
This was a very difficult process strategically and financially for many rescue bidders, but they knew well in advance what they were up against. The hard task now is monitoring the movement of those exotics who aren't under AGFA protection. I hope HSUS stays with it because it's their only hope.
 

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"The Humane Society's claims contradict the assurances given by the Catskill Game Farm, whose owner, Kathie Schulz, told the public that buyers were screened and the animals were going to "good homes."'

A big fat load of crock is what I call that. That, or the lady is genuinely an idiot.

What's even worse is that most of the people who commented on this story focused most of their attention attacking animal rights activists. Hello? Did those morons even read the article?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Veghead0 View Post

"The Humane Society's claims contradict the assurances given by the Catskill Game Farm, whose owner, Kathie Schulz, told the public that buyers were screened and the animals were going to "good homes."'

A big fat load of crock is what I call that. That, or the lady is genuinely an idiot.

What's even worse is that most of the people who commented on this story focused most of their attention attacking animal rights activists. Hello? Did those morons even read the article?
Kathie doesn't care what happens to the animals, plain and simple. She made no effort to get them to sanctuaries, it was highest bidder, period. She would not work with any animal welfare people to place the animals. It was common knowledge that canned hunt operators and others with questionable motives were bidding on the animals.

Some of the comments were from people who obviously don't understand the issue - they somehow concocted in their minds that it was the activists themselves who got the farm shut down, which is completely untrue - if anything, they would have preferred that it stay open, so as not to have this horrible scramble to purchase as many animals as possible, and watch in misery as others face a terrible fate. Some people understand, though, like this person:

Quote:
The Game Farm stayed open for so long in spite of their abuse of the animals. I stopped going years ago after seeing a baboon in a cage with a dirty cement floor, swatting an empty coffee can around. Thank God this disgusting place has closed.
This makes me really sad. I wonder what happened to the baboon.
 
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