VeggieBoards banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, I'm a veggie in progress (going the slow route this time to guarantee success, but it's DEFINITELY working this time!).<br><br><br><br>
I need some feedback on what I need to pay attention to. For example, I read that I (as a 31 yrF) need 50g protein a day, and I'm not sure I'm getting enough.<br><br><br><br>
I still eat dairy, so got appr. 8g from my cereal milk this morning, and the peanut butter I just had for lunch gives me 7g. But even if I have 2 veggieburgers for dinner (as a newbie, I am still relying heavily on canned/frozen food) that is only 30g which still leaves me short.<br><br><br><br>
I do have one frozen dinner that has 25g protein, but I don't think most of them are like that! What are the best ANYTHING to get protein from?<br><br><br><br>
Also, how much iron do I need daily and where are the best places to get that? As I progress, I am eating Total cereal to make sure I'm covering as many vitamins as possible, but I don't plan to eat it forever.<br><br><br><br>
Also B12......and what else? I have oj with added calcium and vitamin D in the mornings as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
I'll address this better later, but here's a quick rundown.<br><br><br><br>
Beans, whole grains (whole wheat bread, brown rice, ww pasta, quinoa, millet, etc), soy and lower-fat dairy also provide good sources of protein.<br><br><br><br>
Iron comes from beans, tofu, whole grains, lentils, nuts.<br><br><br><br>
Vitamin D is not an issue if you drink milk or fortified soy milk. Same with B12.<br><br><br><br>
I'll go over the other ones later.<br><br><br><br>
Also, with fortified cereals, make sure to drink the milk in the bowl, too. The fortification minerals leeched into the milk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,304 Posts
Check out this link. It should answer a lot of your questions.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/index.htm" target="_blank">http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/index.htm</a>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,374 Posts
Yup. Good info so far. Additionally:<br><br><br><br>
Protein<br><br><a href="http://pcrm.org/health/veginfo/protein.html" target="_blank">http://pcrm.org/health/veginfo/protein.html</a><br><br><a href="http://pcrm.org/health/veginfo/vsk/VSK4.html" target="_blank">http://pcrm.org/health/veginfo/vsk/VSK4.html</a><br><br><br><br>
B12<br><br><a href="http://pcrm.org/health/veginfo/b12.html" target="_blank">http://pcrm.org/health/veginfo/b12.html</a><br><br><br><br>
Calcium<br><br><a href="http://pcrm.org/health/veginfo/vsk/VSK5.html" target="_blank">http://pcrm.org/health/veginfo/vsk/VSK5.html</a><br><br><br><br>
EFAs<br><br><a href="http://pcrm.org/health/veginfo/essential_fatty_acids.html" target="_blank">http://pcrm.org/health/veginfo/essen...tty_acids.html</a><br><br><br><br><i>From elsewhere at the PCRM site:</i><br><br><br><br>
"There are 20 different amino acids in the foods we eat, but our body can make only 11 of them. The 9 essential amino acids which cannot be produced by the body must be obtained from the diet. A diet based on a variety of grains, legumes, and vegetables easily provides all of the essential amino acids. It was once thought that various plant foods had to be eaten together to get their full protein value, a method known as "protein combining" or "complementing." We now know that intentional combining is not necessary to obtain all of the essential amino acids.<br><br><br><br>
"Concentrated protein sources include tofu, soymilk, tempeh, seitan, and various meat analogues which can be purchased in any health food store or the vegetarian section of your grocery store.<br><br><br><br>
"Protein requirements are very individualized and are primarily dependent upon body size. The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for the average, sedentary or lightly active adult is 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight per day.10 For most people, this is more than enough. However, some authorities believe that protein needs for athletes may range from 1.2 to 1.7 grams per kilogram of body weight per day for the highly active adult athlete.<br><br><br><br>
"It is important to keep in mind that while some protein will be broken down into amino acids for fuel during exercise, the primary role of protein is for structure and support. While protein needs are increased in the diet of athletes, adequate (10 to 15 percent of calories or enough to meet your calculated requirements), but not excess, protein should be consumed. Protein should come from plant sources, rather than meat, dairy products, and eggs, which are devoid of fiber and complex carbohydrates. Emphasis should be placed on a diet that is high carbohydrate to ensure that protein is spared for those activities it does best: the building and repairing of body tissues, including muscle."<br><br><br><br><i>Tips for Meeting Protein Needs</i><br><br><br><br>
"Top salads with a variety of beans, including chick peas, kidney beans, great northern beans, and black beans. These legumes have as much as 7 to 10 grams of protein per serving."<br><br><br><br>
"Marinated tempeh or veggie burgers grilled on a bun or added to pasta sauce, offer a quick protein boost to any meal.<br><br>
On the go? Sports bars and soy powder shakes are quick and convenient supplements that can help increase the protein content of any well-balanced vegetarian diet."<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Eating a variety of foods is important, including legumes, grains, veggies, and fruits. Don't forget nuts and seeds.<br><br><br><br>
Try to avoid overly processed sources of protein like TVP, if possible, or at least limit your intake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Why should I avoid processed sources like TVP? I actually only recently hit on that and am so glad I really liked it......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,874 Posts
It's ok to eat TVP and other processed foods, but just don't go overboard. They're good for you, but they lack a lot of nutrients that whole foods such as beans, tofu, nuts, whole grains, and fruits and vegetables have. In other words, if you're eating too much processed food, you're probably missing out on a lot of nutrients, so eat a little bit of them, and make whole foods the bulk of your diet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,374 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by tearhsong2</i><br><br><b>It's ok to eat TVP and other processed foods, but just don't go overboard. They're good for you, but they lack a lot of nutrients that whole foods such as beans, tofu, nuts, whole grains, and fruits and vegetables have. In other words, if you're eating too much processed food, you're probably missing out on a lot of nutrients, so eat a little bit of them, and make whole foods the bulk of your diet.</b></div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
What she said. Love ya, babe.<br><br><br><br>
Oh, plus (as soilman so cogently pointed out in another thread I'm too tired to find again) TVP is usually processed with hexane, a petroleum product. There are expeller-pressed versions, but I've never seen one, and they're supposedly pretty expensive.<br><br><br><br>
Eat as close to a food's natural state as possible, and you'll nearly always be in better shape (that's where the raw food movement comes in, but that's another topic entirely... literally -- Oatmeal started one! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)">).
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top