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i have been trying to make the leap to a wheat free diet these last few weeks (geesh it's in everything!) I was wondering what kinds of flours I can subsitute and which kinds work best for what? (ie;breads vs. cookies, vs. muffins etc) is there a differenc in the textures of the final baked goods using different flours? What are your favorites? Other than wheat I've pretty much only used soy and rice flours really..
 

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Kamut and spelt flours are delicious. They are related to wheat, but many people with wheat allergies, for example, can eat these with no ill effects. These two are the closest to wheat in taste and texture and substitute well for whole wheat flour.

Then there are others like amaranth, quinoa, oat, teff and others that do not function the same and need to be used in combination with wheat flours to produce good results. I will add those types here and there in recipes like cookies, bars, sweet loafs, etc., in small amounts. But, a 100 percent amaranth flour loaf bread wouldn't work!


I say give spelt and kamut a try.

Are you phasing out wheat completely, or are you willing to use it in portions?

Also, looking up gluten-free recipes on the internet (do a Google search) will bring up lots. They will show you how to combine flours in the correct proportions. For recipes using all non-wheat flours, such as amaranth, quinoa, rice flour, etc., you may have to buy products such as guar gum or xanthan gum (both vegan). These are used for gluten-free breads.
 

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Ditto everything Strix said, but I just wanted to especially second the spelt suggestion. I use whole spelt flour in my breads, muffins and pancakes and it's wonderful.
 

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My husband had a wheat allergy, so we became quickly acquainted with all the wheat-free alternatives out there. I have to admit, I wasn't really a fan of any of the wheat-free stuff, with the exclusion of rice noodles which, in my opinion, are ten times better than their wheat counterparts. (My husband had an accupressure treatment for his wheat allergy, and that cleared it all up. Sounds wacky, but it totally worked.)

One of the more convenient items I enjoyed was the premixed wheat-free baking mixes. Wheat-free baking often requires the mixing of certain flours to specific ratios for best results, and on my own I had a terrible time trying to get the right proportions. The baking mixes usually even come with stuff like xantham gum mixed in, which also helps.
 
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