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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a great recipe for Hummus that calls for Tahini. So off to the HFS I went, only to discover that there were like 7 different kinds of Tahini. Raw, roasted, salted, unsalted, etc., etc. And like 5 different brands, to boot.<br><br><br><br>
Help! What kind of Tahini does everyone use? I guess I could experiment with all the different kinds, but considering that each jar costs about $5.00, I'd rather not waste my money on something that isn't right.<br><br><br><br>
Thanks!
 

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I use joyva brand tahini. I get the roasted kind b/c sometimes I have a mild allergy to raw nuts/seeds. I think roasting also brings out more of the sesame flavor.
 

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I buy regular ole' tahini...whichever is cheapest, but make up for it with adding a lil' extra fresh garlic and lemon juice...some paprika. Turns out really good...That's the great thing about making hummus..you can kinda add anything that you'd like (well, almost) and it just adds to it.
 

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The health food store stuff is really expensive; Wild Oats wanted ten bucks a jar! Look in the yellow pages for a Middle Eastern supermarket. It's cheap as all heck ($3 vs $10) and the people there told me it's all the same stuff.
 

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I like "Maranatha" or "Arrowhead," but whichever organic variety is available and least expensive is what I choose! I use roasted if a recipe calls for it, or if I want that flavor. Sometimes, I do prefer it in hummous, sometimes, raw.<br><br>
Also, there are tahinis or sesame seed butters/pastes (same thing) usually imported from the Middle East, that come in large jars and are much less expensive. But these are almost always, in my experience, thin and the consistency of salad dressing. So those don't work well in a lot of recipes which assume you're going to use the thick, more common tahini. I use this kind too, but only in recipes where it won't make too much difference. For example, I used it once to try to make halvah! What a disaster. It was too thin. It's great for dressings or as an ingredient in baked goods, seitans, marinades, or even cookies and candies that don't require it to be too prominent an ingredient like halvah does.
 

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Yeah, buy whatever's cheap as long as the ingredients are simply sesame seeds and maybe salt if you're not sensitive to it. When it comes to making hummus and tahini sauce for your falafel any kind of tahini will work just fine. BTW, if you live near a Trader Joe's they've recently begun to carry roasted tahini in small jars that are extremely inexpensive. Two jars equal more than one jar of Maranatha and are cheaper per unit overall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all your help! I'm going to go ahead tonight and make the hummus - I'll let you all know how it turned out.<br><br><br><br>
I'm going to try to find a good Middle Eastern market in my area, but barring that, there's a Trader Joe's down the road. Thanks!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by sherijohnson</i><br><br><b>I have made hummus many times, don't use the tahini - you don't need it. Use everything else and it will taste great!</b></div>
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I agree. That's how I make hummus. A can of chickpeas, some garlic, some lemon juice, a tad of salt and whir the whole thing up. I'm not a big fan of tahini (or sesame seeds, for that matter), so I just leave it out.<br><br><br><br>
Here's some tahini-free hummus recipes:<br><br><a href="http://www.vegweb.com/food/misc/hummus-02.shtml" target="_blank">Hummus</a><br><br><a href="http://www.vegweb.com/food/misc/hummus-04.shtml" target="_blank">Vegan Hummus</a><br><br><a href="http://www.vegweb.com/food/misc/hummus-10.shtml" target="_blank">Another Vegan Hummus</a><br><br><a href="http://www.vegweb.com/food/misc/1351.shtml" target="_blank">Superfast Hummus</a><br><br><a href="http://www.vegweb.com/food/misc/hummus-14.shtml" target="_blank">Vegan Hummus</a><br><br><a href="http://www.vegweb.com/food/misc/hummus-07.shtml" target="_blank">Hummus</a><br><br><a href="http://www.vegweb.com/food/misc/2383.shtml" target="_blank">Zippy Hummus</a><br><br><a href="http://www.vegweb.com/food/appetizers/3199.shtml" target="_blank">In A Hurry Hummus</a><br><br><br><br>
The last recipe is the one that I use and I like it the best.
 

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I just made hummus myself recently.<br><br>
I used Arrowhead Tahini (it was pretty inexpensive)<br><br><br><br>
My recipe came from VeganOutreach.com - but I omitted the water because I wanted a really stiff hummus. This I use as a sandwich spread. I like it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by sherijohnson</i><br><br><b>I have made hummus many times, don't use the tahini - you don't need it. Use everything else and it will taste great!</b></div>
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I made hummus once without and it was disgusting imo. I guess it just depens on your taste.
 

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I love anything sesame, so hummus without it isn't that appealing to me, although certainly not disgusting either.
 

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Although it's processed more, I look for a roasted tahini with added salt. The raw stuff seems to go rancid more easily in my experience. You can tell it's rancid if it smells and or tastes strongly bitter. Sesame should taste nutty and sweet. The cheaper stuff at the middle eastern shops works best for me. Often when I buy it it has a layer of sesame oil sitting atop the butter, which I pour off right away since I like my tahini thick.<br><br>
Brandy
 

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I really like the Woodstock Farms brand and I think it was toasted and I have tried Krinos, that stuff is not as good! I am going to stick with Woodstock Farms. Shannon/Zimma
 

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I dunno--I think the tahini kind of --makes it. my no fail recipe is just this:<br><br>
can of chickpeas, drained & rinsed<br><br>
about 2 spoonfuls tahini (I use the larger spoon in my everyday set)<br><br>
2 cloves garlic, which I usually chop in the processor before ingredients are added<br><br>
2-3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar, depending on taste<br><br>
1-2 tablespoons olive oil<br><br>
pinch salt<br><br>
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin<br><br>
1/4 cup water, more or less, to thin it out and blend better.<br><br>
I use my processor, and just throw it all in. Let it rip for a while, cause I like mine smooooooth. I actually prefer the balsamic to the traditional lemon juice. Maybe it's the bit of sweetness. Last time I chopped calamata olives in it--really good!
 

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The jar I got recently at one of the many Middle Eastern shops in town here was $2.99 for 16 oz. The brand name is Al Nakhil out of Lebanon and the ingredient list is simply "100% Sesame" <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
I don't find it any thinner than the domestic brands since you must stir all of them up thoroughly, just like any unprocessed nut butters. And this brand is recognizable by the tan plastic jar with the green lid <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> And you will be amazed (and hopefully pleasantly so) at the things you can buy in some of these Middle Eastern markets <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 
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