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Hello , I am doing a project and I have to do a survey.
Those who owned a pet rabbit , how do you range for your rabbit when you are travelling overseas ? How many food you prepare and who was there to watch over your rabbit for you?
 

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We have a pet sitter who visits our bunny daily when we're away for short trips (like over Christmas). If we were to go on a longer holiday, our sitter also boards bunnies at her own home.
 

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We have a pet sitter who visits our bunny daily when we're away for short trips (like over Christmas). If we were to go on a longer holiday, our sitter also boards bunnies at her own home.
Can we see pics of your rabbit?
 
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I really love animals, but cats in particular are my favorite animals as pets. However, i find it unethical to have a vegan cat since cats are naturally carnivores. I'm considering adopting a rabbit instead, but I'm not sure how rabbits do with being alone for a few hours during the day while I'm working and I'm also not sure if they're very affectionate. Also, can they roam the house freely?
 

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I really love animals, but cats in particular are my favorite animals as pets. However, i find it unethical to have a vegan cat since cats are naturally carnivores. I'm considering adopting a rabbit instead, but I'm not sure how rabbits do with being alone for a few hours during the day while I'm working and I'm also not sure if they're very affectionate. Also, can they roam the house freely?
I'm a cat person turned bunny mom, so I might be able to offer some insight.

We have one rabbit and she has free roam of the apartment, no cage or enclosure of any kind, and a litter box-- just like a cat. She's not as precise with the litter box as a cat, and often leaves poop right outside of it, but rabbit poop is dry and odourless, so it's not too much of a pain. She has a favourite corner of the room where she sleeps for most of the day. She's very quiet and seems to prefer solitude. She enjoys being stroked but not picked up, and I have to go to her because she's never approached me specifically looking for affection (although she runs up to me and circles my legs when she knows I have food for her.) We adopted her from a friend at age three. She's always been a solo bunny, but I've read that most rabbits do better in bonded pairs. With two rabbits, you won't have to worry about them getting lonely while you're at work. You will have to rabbit-proof your home by concealing electrical wires and other dangerous items. Our bunny has never chewed on anything of ours, but apparently that's unusual as they like to chew. Overall, I've found my rabbit to be great company. She's sweet, gentle, cute, and very soft. I am a bit in love with her.
 

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I really love animals, but cats in particular are my favorite animals as pets. However, i find it unethical to have a vegan cat since cats are naturally carnivores. I'm considering adopting a rabbit instead, but I'm not sure how rabbits do with being alone for a few hours during the day while I'm working and I'm also not sure if they're very affectionate. Also, can they roam the house freely?
I'm a cat-person-turned-bunny-mom, so I might be able to offer some insight.

We have one rabbit and she has free roam of the apartment, no cage or enclosure of any kind, and a litter box-- just like a cat. She's not as precise with the litter box as a cat, and often leaves poop right outside of it, but rabbit poop is dry and odourless, so it's not too much of a pain. She has a favourite corner of the room where she sleeps for most of the day. She's very quiet and seems to prefer solitude. She enjoys being stroked but not picked up, and I have to go to her because she's never approached me specifically looking for affection (although she runs up to me and circles my legs when she knows I have food for her.) We adopted her from a friend at age three. She's always been a solo bunny, but I've read that most rabbits do better in bonded pairs. With two rabbits, you won't have to worry about them getting lonely while you're at work. You will have to rabbit-proof your home by concealing electrical wires and other dangerous items. Our bunny has never chewed on anything of ours, but apparently that's unusual as they like to chew. Overall, I've found my rabbit to be great company. She's sweet, gentle, cute, and very soft. I am a bit in love with her.
Aw l, that's good to hear. I was afraid that my love for rabbits would never be even close to my love for cats. I just love how cats are so affectionate and cuddly. Maybe I'll be fortunate enough to find a rabbit that thinks he/she is a cat:stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:
 

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Aw l, that's good to hear. I was afraid that my love for rabbits would never be even close to my love for cats. I just love how cats are so affectionate and cuddly. Maybe I'll be fortunate enough to find a rabbit that thinks he/she is a cat:stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:
I'm sure that there are affectionate rabbits out there. I've only had experience with my snooty little princess, though. ;)

Rabbits are funny in how they show displeasure. You know how an annoyed cat might flick its tail or swipe at you with a paw? Bunnies are much more passive-aggressive. They'll turn their back to you, peeking at you over their shoulders to see if you're properly repentant for giving them the wrong kind of treat or whatever else you did to offend. If they abruptly turn and then start grooming, it's like they're saying, "Go away, I'm done with you!" 😂

They can be so sweet, though. Our Honey Bun flattens herself out like a pancake and closes her eyes when we stroke her head, then makes soft little chattering sounds with her teeth. This is the bunny version of purring! When she gets excited and runs around the room doing little jumps and kicks, it's the greatest thing. I really do recommend it!
 

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I really love animals, but cats in particular are my favorite animals as pets. However, i find it unethical to have a vegan cat since cats are naturally carnivores. I'm considering adopting a rabbit instead, but I'm not sure how rabbits do with being alone for a few hours during the day while I'm working and I'm also not sure if they're very affectionate. Also, can they roam the house freely?
The House Rabbit Society website has a great deal of useful info for prospective bunny parents. Although they don't have an Arizona chapter, I did a quick Google search, and there appear to be a number of rabbit rescues in Arizona. In the course of that, I happened on this guy, who apparently is a great cuddler: http://www.rascallyrabbitrescue.org/ :p
 

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The House Rabbit Society website has a great deal of useful info for prospective bunny parents. Although they don't have an Arizona chapter, I did a quick Google search, and there appear to be a number of rabbit rescues in Arizona. In the course of that, I happened on this guy, who apparently is a great cuddler: http://www.rascallyrabbitrescue.org/
Oh, look at him! ???
 

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I really love animals, but cats in particular are my favorite animals as pets. However, i find it unethical to have a vegan cat since cats are naturally carnivores. I'm considering adopting a rabbit instead, but I'm not sure how rabbits do with being alone for a few hours during the day while I'm working and I'm also not sure if they're very affectionate. Also, can they roam the house freely?
The House Rabbit Society website has a great deal of useful info for prospective bunny parents. Although they don't have an Arizona chapter, I did a quick Google search, and there appear to be a number of rabbit rescues in Arizona. In the course of that, I happened on this guy, who apparently is a great cuddler: http://www.rascallyrabbitrescue.org/
Oh thanks! He sounds like he would be the perfect pet:) I'd definitely want to adopt from a shelter rather than a pet store. I've heard a lot of horrible things about pet stores:/
 

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Oh thanks! He sounds like he would be the perfect pet:) I'd definitely want to adopt from a shelter rather than a pet store. I've heard a lot of horrible things about pet stores:/
Rabbits get a really tough break. They're one of those animals that people buy on impulse (many stores get them in especially for Easter) and then get rid of after a short while. The local bunny rescue has at least a hundred rabbits on its website, with a note that the ones listed are just a sample of the many more that they are trying to adopt out at any given time.
 

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Rabbits get a really tough break. They're one of those animals that people buy on impulse (many stores get them in especially for Easter) and then get rid of after a short while. The local bunny rescue has at least a hundred rabbits on its website, with a note that the ones listed are just a sample of the many more that they are trying to adopt out at any given time.[/QUOTE]
Yeah, it's really sad:/ I didn't even know there were rabbit shelters though until recently. I try to adopt all pets from shelters because they're the ones that need homes the most. Also when you buy from a pet store it encourages them to continue to breed animals when there are already so many unwanted pets in shelters.
 

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Actually, rabbits don't "purr". What they're doing is grinding their teeth when they're happy, so it sounds a little like cat purring, but it's not. They don't have vocal chords, so they don't vocalize like most mammals we're used to.

Rabbits make great pets, but as mentioned above, you WILL need to bunny-proof. They'll chew on anything they can get their little teeth around. So you'll need to cover up/remove things they shouldn't chew on, and give them toys and hay, so they have something appropriate to chew.

My Flash likes chewing on cardboard boxes, willow baskets, and even whitewood 2x4s. When I moved into my current apartment, I had to put plastic edges on the corners of the walls and baseboards, to keep him from chewing on them. And he's not allowed in my bedroom, where there's too much trouble he can get into.

Also, someone mentioned bonded pairs of bunnies above, so I thought I'd throw out a HUGE warning for someone who's new to bunnies. They're very territorial, and always establish a "pecking order" when they socialize with each other. That means you can't just grab two bunnies and make them live together, because they WILL fight for supremacy when they first meet, possibly with bloody results. Bonding a pair of bunnies is a process that takes time and patience.

If you want two of them to keep each other company while you're not home, your best bet is to ask the shelter you're adopting from if they have an already bonded pair that you can adopt together. Most shelters with lots of bunnies will have some pairs like that. Also remember that bonded pairs might not be as affectionate as solo buns with their human families, because they have each other for companionship.

As mentioned above, the House Rabbit Society web site, rabbit.org, is THE place for bunny info, so definitely go there and read up on diet, toys, litter training, bunny proofing your home, etc before adopting your first bun.

--Fromper
:juggle:
 

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I didn't mean to imply that bunnies literally purr, just that they make a sound when they're happy which is analogous to a cat's purr.Sorry for the confusion!
 
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