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I'm currently L/O. At home and at work (I bring my lunches) I'm mostly vegan, no problem. Most of the non-vegan stuff I get comes when I travel, and I want to reduce that -- the non-vegan, not the travel.<br><br><br><br>
There are some complications. We live in the farm belt, where avoiding animal products is mostly a foreign notion. We are cyclists, often riding 50-100 miles a day. This burns huge calories, so a normally sized meal just doesn't do it and a salad as a meal is right out; and so we favor buffets. Ethnic foods have been our mainstay since we went veg, but communication with the servers is quite a challenge in most cases.<br><br><br><br>
So given this situation, do you all have any ideas on how to manage the food issue effectively?<br><br><br><br>
Thanks for your input,<br><br><br><br>
Jeanne
 

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I'm vegan and basically live on the road working on different client sites all around everywhere staying in hotels and eating in restaurants constantly. I find it quite easy. You just need to be aware of what restaurants serve and how to communicate with them. Its easy with practice and the smaller the restaurant the better, I've found.<br><br><br><br>
Easiest are:<br><br><br><br>
1) veggie pizza with no cheese<br><br>
2) spaghetti aglia olio<br><br>
3) Chinese restaurants if they have tofu on the menu. Buy 'Vegan Passport' and it has your dietary restrictions written in zillions of languages to assist your comminication. <a href="http://www.vegetarianguides.co.uk/products/veganpassport.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.vegetarianguides.co.uk/pr...passport.shtml</a><br><br><br><br>
But the most important thing to do is research where you are going and where you plan on staying the night. Plan to stay in decent sized towns with few restaurant choices and research what restaurants are available before you go there. You can even call up nice non-chain restaurants reserve a table telling them your dietary restrictions a few days in advance to give them a chance to make something special for you. Many smaller bistro type places would be happy to make a risotto or similar for you.<br><br><br><br>
Another thing to consider is to cook yourself. You can buy stuff from shops and cook them yourself if you're staying in a campground or at a hostel with cooking facilities. Even if you're staying in a hotel you can sometimes find a way to secretly cook something up in a small backpacking stove in the parking lot or in a nearby park.<br><br><br><br>
You can also cook in your hotel room if you bring along your own electric steamer. Cook veg, tofu and rice in the steamer and buy a jar of sauce for a simple big meal. You can also cook in a Thermos using supermarket ingredients and boiling water from an electric kettle.<br><br><br><br>
If you have specific situations please list them and I'm sure I can find an answer for you.
 

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I always look for hotels with rooms with kitchenettes. These rooms may be a bit more expensive, but the cost you save vs. eating out more than makes up for the difference. The last vacation I took, I was able to do my own cooking 80% of the time with this strategy. Of course, you need to know how to prepare a few quickie plant-based meals because you won't have access to all of the good stuff you're likely to have at home. Someone should write a veg*n cookbook for people on the road. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sunny.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":sunny:">
 

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bring vegan energy bars with you wherever you go. when you can't find vegan options, just whip it out. (the energy bar)<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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I've found that at a lot of restaurants, it's a matter of getting something without cheese. Even if a mexican dish, house salad etc. doesn't list cheese as included, I ask for it without either way. I agree with MrFalafel's suggestions. I've had to eat a lot of spagetti while travelling.<br><br><br><br>
Hostels are where it's at! Not only are they cheaper than hotels, they usually have a kitchen (you can check before you book). I've found that pasta with tomato sauce is the meal of choice for hostel frequenters, so the stuff I make tends to look gourmet.<br><br><br><br>
When roadtripping through the US (which I seldom do), I go to Taco Bell... :/
 
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