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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First, let me say that I am not anti gym, anti weight lifting, or anti machine. But there are many advantages (primarily cost and convenience) to learning how to train effectively without having to use any of these. I figured I'd share some of the techniques I use because there might be a few people out there who could benefit. Also, nothing I do is new or revolutionary. In fact, any exercise program that claims to be is usually full of it and just trying to make a quick buck off a fad. Everything I do, aside from perhaps a few modifications for my own specific needs, I've learned from someone else (military training, martial arts, rosstraining.com, etc.). Anyway, here are a few examples of some of the exercises I use:<br><br>
Weighted vest or backpack.<br>
I use a V-Max from weightvest.com for convenience, but they're a bit pricey and a backpack or hiking pack full of pre-measured sand bags for easy adjustment works almost as well. Just fill a ziplock with sand, wrap the hell out of it with some strong tape, write down the weight on it, and throw it in.<br><br>
You can hit any muscle with calisthenics as you can with isolation resistance training at the gym. The disadvantage is typically that they are only useful as endurance training exercises. The vest/backpack negates this disadvantage. Here is a short list of my favorites:<br>
Chin-ups, pull-ups, muscle ups, horizontal pull ups, pushups (and the many pushup variations), squats, lateral jumps, crunches, V-ups, Russian twists, gymnastic and wrestling bridges, and burpees.<br><br>
From there, you can apply the same principles as you would apply in a conventional gym workout. If you're going for maximal strength, use high weight low rep. If you're going for muscular endurance, reduce the weight and increase the reps. For conditioning, you can build interval or circuit training routines using combinations of 3 or 4 different exercises.<br><br>
Ab wheel<br>
This might sound cheesy, but variations of standing rollouts are incredible for building core strength.<br><br>
Jump rope<br>
Aside from simply being a good workout, speed roping forces you to remain focused on timing while fatigued. This is critical in combat sports, or any sport for that matter. It's not just coincidence that boxers do a lot of rope training.<br><br>
Portable gymnastic rings (can be thrown over anything from a tree branch to a swing set at a park)<br>
I bought mine, but they're pretty easy to make. Essentially turns any location into a pull up station. I toss them over the swing set at the park near my house.<br><br>
Rope climbing<br>
Same muscle groups as pullups, but with the addition of a killer grip workout. Grip, by the way, is extremely underrated. Whether you're a rock climber or a submission grappler, you don't have to use much imagination to think of a benefit to having a strong grip.<br><br>
This is just scratching the surface really. A simple list of exercises is not a workout routine by any stretch of the imagination. Routines are a bit more specific depending on what the goal is. Sport specific conditioning, bodybuilding, weight loss, etc. are all achieved through very different methods. But, again, anyone on a budget, without much free time, on the road a lot, or deployed out in the boonies with no access to a gym might benefit from the knowledge that expensive equipment is not necessary to stay in shape.<br><br>
Happy to expand on this if anyone shows interest, and I also encourage anyone else with an interest and something to add to contribute to the thread.
 

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I'm interested in the grip stuff. You said in the other thread grip training strengthens wrists too? What's a good way to start training to improve grip and wrist strength (without going straight to rope climbing because I'm confidant I can't do that).
 

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<ul><li>Swimming in thick vegan caramel sauce.</li>
</ul>
This increases arm muscle strength since swimming in the sauce is difficult. All you need is a huge pot and tons of brown sugar, maple syrup and cornstarch.<br><br><ul><li>Throwing American congressmen off mountains.</li>
</ul>
Climbing a mountain, your thigh muscles become tighter. Then throwing the congressman helps with your arms and also makes your stomach more firm, as you are lifting him.
 

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How about: jumping to conclusions, dodging responsibilities, throwing one's weight around, beating around the bush... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><br><br>
Seriously though: for some wierd reason, I and some people I know tend not to stay with exercise programs at home. I had a list of stretching and strength-building exercises to do, and I just didn't stay with it. When I joined a local YMCA, I made a point to go there 2 or 3 times a week. (But even then, there were times I only went once or twice, which wasn't enough if I wanted to progress and not just stay at whatever level I was at). My mother had one of those stationary exercise cycles, and she never used it for long.<br><br>
The extensive walking I do is different: I have to go and buy food, etc., and I rely on my feet for transportation- so it's a part of my general living routine. Also, I just like walking as an activity and don't have to push myself to do it. I enjoy the warm, loose feeling I get after a strength-training session, and it does make me stronger (although I'll never win any bodybuilding competitions). I just find the actual workout a bit unpleasant, as a rule.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>kazyeeqen</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3050545"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I'm interested in the grip stuff. You said in the other thread grip training strengthens wrists too? What's a good way to start training to improve grip and wrist strength (without going straight to rope climbing because I'm confidant I can't do that).</div>
</div>
<br>
Most resistance training movements naturally incorporate some wrist training. Probably the best thing you can do without even having to create any unique movements specifically for the wrists is simply to focus on going through a full range of motion with your wrist flexors as opposed to just moving your arms. Chinups work great for this or, if that is not realistic or if you prefer to use regular weights, curls or anything that mimics the movements of curling is great. If you use a loosely filled burlap sack (sand or grains work great for weight) instead of dumbbells or barbells, then just do the same exercises with the sack as you'd do with normal weights and it will accomplish pretty much the same goals but force you to actively utilize more hand muscles since you don't have the luxury of a bar to grab onto. Note that although a bar does increase grip strength as well, it does not allow your hand to progress through any ranges of motion so the benefit to them is considerably more limited.<br><br>
For some additional grip training, open up that sack and grab handfulls of sand or grains and squeeze as forcefully as you can. As the grains seep out of your hands, your hand muscles will go through a full range of motion. Just do this over and over. This technique has been used by martial artists for a long, long time, and is very effective.<br><br>
Those hand grippers with the springs actually work very well, but make sure it is strong enough to actually provide some decent resistance.<br><br>
Also, if rope climbing isn't realistic, you can try horizontal pullups using a rope or pair of ropes instead of a bar. Horizontal pullups are significantly easier than standard pullups or chin ups since your feet still pivot on the ground. If you're not familiar with horizontal pullups you can just youtube it, there are plenty of tutorials. Probably the hardest part is finding something to drape the ropes over, but anything from a tree branch to a swing set will work. Also, to work different ranges of motion for your hand muscles, you can get a few different thicknesses of rope and switch from workout to workout.<br><br>
Now if I remember correctly we were also talking about actually increasing the size of the wrist to manipulate BMI measurements. This is kind of difficult because small muscle groups like those in the wrist and hand are much less prone to hypertrophy than larger groups like the biceps or triceps, and even less prone to hypertrophy in women since a large part of muscle development happens simply as a result of testosterone. So although it is fairly easy to work on grip and wrist strength and endurance with a bit of imagination, actually increasing visible muscle size is not likely to happen.
 

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Yeah no, I don't need to build up muscle on my wrists. I just broke my arm a couple of years ago and my wrist is still not up to peak efficiency (maybe never will, that's life). And I have delicate female hands, not very strong. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":shy:"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
Thanks for all the tips! The grain/sand thing is a good idea, and my man was just telling me about horizontal pullups...
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>nomad888</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3050337"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Routines are a bit more specific depending on what the goal is. Sport specific conditioning, bodybuilding, <b>weight loss</b>, etc. are all achieved through very different methods.</div>
</div>
<br>
What would be the nature of workout routines designed for the goal of weight loss?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Joe</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3050861"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
What would be the nature of workout routines designed for the goal of weight loss?</div>
</div>
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The best I can give is my opinion, as the nature of weight loss is highly debatable.<br><br>
Variety and progression are the most important. The body adapts to to the challenges we introduce to it, always trying to become more efficient. As far as weight loss is concerned, this means if you suddenly decide to run 3 miles per day at a 7 minute per mile pace, you will probably find that although you initially experience weight loss as a result, it is temporary. This is because repeatedly doing the same thing at the same intensity allows your body to adapt with conservation of energy as it's objective. Machines like treadmills tend to produce diminishing returns for this reason.<br><br>
My advice is first to keep workout intensity high and, as your cardiovascular abilities improve, push yourself with increasing intensity accordingly. Second, alternate routines and exercises used in those routines regularly. Here are a few types of training that I believe are very effective for burning calories:<br><br>
Circuit training: An example of circuit training would be to choose a few different exercises (i.e. pushups, jumprope, crunches), and spend 10 minutes alternating between these exercises at a predetermined interval with no breaks in between. 1 min doing pushups, 1 min jumping rope, 1 minute doing crunches, 50 seconds doing pushups, 50 seconds jumping rope, 50 seconds doing crunches, etc. without stopping at all during the 10 minutes.<br><br>
Interval training: You can either alternate intensity or even have periods of rest. For example: Run 2 miles by sprinting at maximum speed for 20 seconds, then jogging at a snails pace for 10 seconds, and repeating this interval throughout the run. Another example: Put together circuits similar to the previous circuit routine using a similar timing scheme to the previously mentioned running method. 20 seconds of pushups at maximum intensity/speed, followed by 10 seconds of rest<br><br>
There are a lot of different ways you can go about circuit and interval training. I'd encourage anyone interested to google the following terms: integrated circuit training, high intensity interval training, tabata intervals. Do some research and have some fun putting together a variety of routines. Just make sure your body doesn't get much of a chance to adapt to any one of them. It's okay to repeat the same one every now and then, just don't overdo it.<br><br>
To increase the variety, you can also use different variations of the same exercise. Pushups, for example, can be done in countless different ways. Close, standard, and wide grip. Hindu pushups, divebomber pushups, pushups on an incline or decline, etc.<br><br>
Always be progressing. More intensity, higher repetitions, whatever. Just make sure you are pushing yourself just a little harder every day to compensate for increased efficiency.<br><br>
If you have access to a pool, swimming can also be incorporated into this type of training. What I like to do is put together routines where I might do one lap, jump out of the pool and do pushups for a minute, do another lap, jump out of the pool and do Russian twists for a minute, etc.<br><br>
Be sure to hit many muscle groups over the course of your workouts. Stronger muscles are inherently less efficient (burn more calories even during rest time simply by existing). This is why they are genetically predispositioned to atrophy in order to save energy during periods of non-use.<br><br>
Abandon the idea of burning most of your calories through the workout itself. Most energy will be burned through increased resting metabolism. With enough variety, your body will be expending more calories repairing and restoring muscle tissues while you are sleeping than you will expend while actually performing the workout.<br><br>
Clean up your diet. No amount of exercise will burn fat if you aren't controlling what you eat.<br><br>
Oh, and spot reduction is a myth. This is not debated in legitimate exercise science really, but I still see it pop up in magazines every now and then. Crunches do not burn more belly fat than pushups, and squats do not burn more leg fat than pullups. The exercise determines only how much energy is consumed and how much will be needed to repair. Genetics determine where that energy will come from. Fat will typically be lost in reverse of how it was gained.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tom</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3050572"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
How about: jumping to conclusions, dodging responsibilities, throwing one's weight around, beating around the bush... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><br></div>
</div>
<br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>nomad888</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3050881"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
The best I can give is my opinion, as the nature of weight loss is highly debatable.<br><br>
...<br><br>
Oh, and spot reduction is a myth. This is not debated in legitimate exercise science really, but I still see it pop up in magazines every now and then. Crunches do not burn more belly fat than pushups, and squats do not burn more leg fat than pullups. The exercise determines only how much energy is consumed and how much will be needed to repair. Genetics determine where that energy will come from. Fat will typically be lost in reverse of how it was gained.</div>
</div>
<br>
Thank you very much for the info. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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body weight exercises are great. Lunges, jumping, kickbacks, jumping jacks, treadmill etc, all for timed intervals......have a great video for you to see...<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8c-HJjpZsE&feature=related" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8c-H...eature=related</a>
 

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Call me when you can put 120 kg in a weighted vest. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p">
 

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I like the gym.<br><br>
But... Here's exercise I do outside of the gym:<br>
Hiking (if you wear a 30 pound toddler on your back it's serious strength training)<br>
Running (if you push a jogging stroller you get arm work with your cardio)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Envy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3051227"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Call me when you can put 120 kg in a weighted vest. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"></div>
</div>
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Numbers are irrelevant for my purposes. Most people who can bench large amounts of weight can't do more than a few pullups or even climb a rope without any load at all. For me, being able to march for extended periods of time on rough terrain or rappel from a helicopter while wearing a flak vest and a moderate load of equipment and still have enough juice left in me to engage an enemy, should the need arise, is more important than the ability to pick things up and put them down while lying on a bench <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> We all have our own goals, and my calisthenics based, predominantly outdoor routine is suited for mine and mine alone.
 

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I have been involved in weight lifting for 12yrs (with a 2yr absence), and have tried multiple training programs from benching 335, squatting 505, dead lifting 450...to doing variations of hi-low programs- pick a weight that is 70% and 40% your max and do sets of 12 light 6 heavy, 10 light 5 heavy, 8 light 4 heavy- that is one set repeat for another set. This workout program gave me insane results but also resulted in fatigue and over-training. I have since left the gym and have entered in the home gym using one tool that has really balanced my body by increasing strength on my weak areas, giving me a better range of motion, reducing stress on my joint and ligaments, and giving me better balance and coordination. I know some people think this item is not worth the money (as did I) but the TRX Suspension trainer is the tool that does it all for my needs...it applies resistance while letting you be the controller of difficulty. I agree with the OP, who cares how much you can bench if you cant put it into real life scenarios or create imbalances within your body so bad that it hurts your shoulders to sleep at night (yes this was me). I now have more energy, a tighter core, much more mobility, more balanced body, and I can actually sleep at night and wake-up in the morning without any shoulder pain...and believe me the TRX workouts will kick your butt! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/shocked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":eek:">
 

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These crossfit workouts have been pretty good for me when I can't get to the gym<br><br>
Angie<br>
100 Pullups<br>
100 Pushups<br>
100 Situps<br>
100 Squats<br><br>
Barbara<br>
20 Pullups<br>
30 Pushups<br>
40 Situps<br>
50 Squats<br>
(Either 5 rounds for time, or 5 rounds with 3:00 rest between each round.)<br><br>
Chelsea<br>
Each min on the minute for 30 minutes<br>
5 Pullups<br>
10 Pushups<br>
15 Squats<br><br>
Cindy<br>
As many rounds as possible in 20 minutes<br>
5 Pullups<br>
10 Pushups<br>
15 Squats<br><br>
Mary<br>
As many rounds as possible in 20 minutes<br>
5 Handstand pushups<br>
10 1 legged squats<br>
15 Pullups<br><br>
Nicole<br>
As many rounds as possible in 20 minutes<br>
Run 400m<br>
Max rep pullups<br>
Note number of pullups each round.<br><br>
Murph<br>
Run 1 mile<br>
100 pullups<br>
200 pushups<br>
300 squats<br>
Run 1 mile<br>
Partition the pullups,<br>
pushups,<br>
and squats as needed. Start and finish with a mile run.<br>
If you've got a 20# vest or body armor, wear it.<br><br>
Jason<br>
100 Squats<br>
5 Muscleups<br>
75 Squats<br>
10 Muscleups<br>
50 Squats<br>
15 Muscleups<br>
25 Squats<br>
20 Muscleups<br><br>
Griff<br>
Run 800m<br>
Run 400m backward<br>
Run 800m<br>
Run 400m backward<br><br>
Ryan<br>
5 rounds for time:<br>
7 muscleups<br>
21 burpees<br>
Each burpee 12 above max reach
 

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Have you thought about working out with kettlebells? They're kind of pricey but very versatile.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Green_Gentleman</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3070638"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Have you thought about working out with kettlebells? They're kind of pricey but very versatile.</div>
</div>
<br>
Actually I have some homemade kettlebells, I'm kind of cheap like that lol. They're not quite as nice looking as the store bought ones, but a lot cheaper. There's lots of websites out there for homemade equipment of almost any type. My medicine balls are homemade as well using basketballs that I've basically injected with sand.
 

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body weight exercises are the BEST.. here is a link to help you. clink on how to videos.. nerdfitness.com
 

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I like to go running. No fancy equipment required, although I wouldn't mind getting one of this distance counters.<br><br>
Biking is probably my favourite thing to do, as it can be practical and not just for exercise (eg biking to meet people or go to the grocery store).<br><br>
Now that it's winter, I've been going to the local pool. It's only $4.60 to drop in for lane swimming. It's a great cardio workout, plus it works out the muscles (especially the triceps!)
 
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