VeggieBoards banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As you may already know, I have recently become a vegan.<br><br><br><br>
In my search for more ways to incorporate protein into my diet, I have come to the realization that tofu is apparently, the food of the vegan gods <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">.<br><br><br><br>
My problem is this...I am a texture freak. If something feels gross and mushy in my mouth, I don't want it. I don't like soggy, soft foods.<br><br><br><br>
Do you have any tips on cooking with tofu that will eliminate this problem? Any great recipes?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
mmmm, I love deep fried tofu. <a href="http://vegweb.com/index.php?topic=8769.0" target="_blank">General Tao's Tofu..</a> <-- this recipe is soo good!! Highly recommend it!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,851 Posts
Tofu smoothies<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/hamster.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":hamster:"> (silken Tofu)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
345 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>ldpullen</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
My problem is this...I am a texture freak. If something feels gross and mushy in my mouth, I don't want it. I don't like soggy, soft foods.</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
The first time I had tofu, it was put into a stir-fry in big chunks and was undercooked. I couldn't take the texture, so I can understand where you're coming from!<br><br><br><br>
The first recipe I found that helped me eat tofu was baking it. Get the extra firm variety and put it in the freezer. (I just toss them in the freezer when I get home from the grocery store, so we always have some frozen tofu.) Thaw the tofu and drain it. Press some of the excess water out and then chop it into 1/2 inch to inch long cubes. Marinate it in whatever you like. I usually let it set all day, or even overnight, in a mix of soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic powder, ginger and a little bit of pepper. Bake it at 350 until it looks done. It's sort of chewy and really flavorful when made this way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,521 Posts
If you get some of the ready marinated stuff (I like taifun almond and seasame), it actually works well sliced on sandwiches with salad!!! This particular kind is quite firm anyway, but I second freezing the stuff, certainly...<br><br><br><br>
pirate x
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
927 Posts
I sometimes make tofu "carnitas": cut into rather small cubes (maybe 1/4 inch), dust in chili powder and garlic powder, and bake at 350 until they are pretty dry and firm (30 minutes or more). Use in tacos, burritos, or mixed with corn, onions, and peppers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you so much for the tips! I never thought of baking it!<br><br><br><br>
Keep those great tofu tips coming, please....
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
19,873 Posts
This stuff is great, it's firm right out of the package...<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.nasoya.com/nasoya/tofu_cubed.html" target="_blank">http://www.nasoya.com/nasoya/tofu_cubed.html</a><br><br><br><br>
We get it at Meijer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,929 Posts
Slice thin (it gets crispier), marinate and bake 15 minutes, flip em over and bake 15 more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
If you're in a sweet-tooth mood, I really like this recipe:<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.vegetarianbaby.com/recipes/choclatecreampie.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.vegetarianbaby.com/recipe...creampie.shtml</a><br><br><br><br>
It tastes pretty much like choco pudding (in my opinion, better). I like to make an oreo crust to go with it (or if you're feeling lazy, crush some oreos and sprinkle on top). <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> I suggest letting it sit overnight though, to take in all the flavors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
The voice of wisdom has already spoken - freezing tofu is the best way to change the texture.<br><br><br><br>
Try recipes that call for blending and seasoning tofu, like in tofu quiche (I use this one: <a href="http://vegweb.com/index.php?topic=10760" target="_blank">http://vegweb.com/index.php?topic=10760</a> )<br><br><br><br>
and vegan manicotti (I *love* this one: <a href="http://vegweb.com/index.php?topic=4675" target="_blank">http://vegweb.com/index.php?topic=4675</a> )<br><br><br><br>
But you should also give other nicely textured protein options a try, like tempeh and seitan.<br><br><br><br>
Tempeh you should be able to find in health food stores - it's got a heartier texture than tofu, as it's made from pressed soybeans.<br><br><br><br>
Seitan has a sort of meatlike texture. You can buy it ready made, or you can make your own from scratch, using wheat gluten flour. Try this recipe: <a href="http://vegweb.com/index.php?topic=7589" target="_blank">http://vegweb.com/index.php?topic=7589</a><br><br><br><br>
You may also be able to find bean curd noodles or bean curd skins in asian markets. These are also made from soy, and are sold dry in packages (at least the ones I buy are). You soak them in water to soften, then cook. I find they're very tasty in stir fries, or pan-fried/sauteed in a tasty batter or sauce.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top