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It has come to my attention that there is tofu and there is Tofu!<br><br>
It all began many moons ago when I happened across "The Vegetarian Restaurant" in my old home town. Hardly anyone knew it was there, I think it was open for about a year, before those poor fellows had to close their doors. They sold vegetarian Chinese foods, fair trade tea and coffee and some delicious little potato vegan cookies.<br><br>
Anyway. They had Tofu! Oh, you have never had such delicious Tofu! You know most tofu, when you fry it it just looks like a tiny little sponge. Like a little hard pillow with bubbles in it. Not this Tofu! This Tofu! was softer and billowy and spongy in the way that you could actually squeeze it and make it flat if you wanted to. It was like a delicious pillow of soft delicous Tofu!<br><br>
And then they closed down!! And I didn't even know, I went bck there one day and it was closed. That was a really sad day, being that the only vegetarian place in town was closed. Plus - I never got a chance to ask them where they got their Tofu! from.<br><br>
I have tried a few different brands, but alas, have only found tofu.<br><br>
Perhaps it was homemade Tofu!?<br><br>
Does anyone here make their own Tofu!?<br><br>
What is the best brand of of Tofu! you have found?<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

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Hi, cheeno.<br><br><br><br>
I don't make my own tofu, but found this: <a href="http://www.ellenskitchen.com/clearlight/tofu/tofu1.html" target="_blank">http://www.ellenskitchen.com/clearlight/tofu/tofu1.html</a><br><br><br><br>
The site lists different types of tofu, such as Aburage (Deep fried Tofu Slices) and freeze dried tofu (koyadofu). According to the site: "The spongy dried tofu we're talking about is actually dry-frozen, rather than freeze dried (a rather high-tech process where something is frozen, then flash dried under vacuum). Made traditionally, the tofu freezes at night, breaking down the structure. During the day, when it warms up and the sun comes out, the liquid runs off and it dries. This is repeated until liquid is no longer released. With a resemblance to sponge rubber, it absorbs sauces voraciously, and may be an acquired taste. Cost ranges from $3-$5 US for 3 to 4 ounces, which is equivalent to about 2 pounds (2-3 packages) of fresh tofu."<br><br><br><br>
I've never even seen this stuff in the stores, but maybe it's what you're looking for? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/huh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":confused:"> I typed <i>spongy tofu</i> into google. The only tofu I've eaten has been the fresh boxed kind or the NoriNu brand. Now I'm intrigued! Hmm...Anyway, hope this helps.
 

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I might be able to help with this (maybe)<br><br><br><br>
I'm a tofu-aholic, and LUCKY ME - I live in Japan right now!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
I think the awesome tofu you experienced is what some call "fresh tofu". Actually all tofu (except processed tofu products) is fresh - so it really shouldn't be referred to as "fresh tofu".<br><br><br><br>
The reason this tofu tastes different than the boxed stuff most people are used to is how it's made - and could involve many factors.<br><br><br><br>
* There are two ways to set tofu Gypsum (calcium sulfate) and Nigari (magnesium chloride). Asian tofu is usually set with Nigari - and, in my opinion - Nigari is better!. I've done taste tests and have made both - the taste is quite different.<br><br><br><br>
* The type of soybean matters. When I get soybeans from the United States - they are smallish and not so great. Japanese soy beans are bigger and better quality. I've made soy milk and tofu using both - the asian (or maybe just better quality) soybean makes better milk and tofu.<br><br><br><br>
* The process matters as well. In Kamakura and Hokaiido they have this tofu that is absolutely to total die for. It is sold in the container it's made in - in a bowl of sorts. You can just go and get a spoon and eat this tofu right out of the container - and you don't even need any sauce or dip or anything - it's totally fabulous. I'm not sure exactly all the differences - but for sure - this tofu is made in smaller batches by hand.....not in huge batches with big machines.<br><br><br><br>
So that's most of what I know about it if any of it helps.<br><br>
The difference could be a combination of any of these factors.
 

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i know the tofu that you are talking about .... i can get it in asian grocery stores in brisbane (australia).<br><br>
check out a local asian grocery store if you can!<br><br>
mmmmmm <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/drool.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":drool:"><br><br><br><br>
i first tried tofu when i was living in japan. i was so surpised to see a big FRESH tofu section in the supermarket with the tofu in huge tubs of water and the staff cooking it there and handing out taste testers/samples ... mmmmm i wasn't even vegetarian then but i love(d) tofu! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

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I agree, it must have been fresh. At the Asian markets I shop, they have them floating in tubs of water, made fresh daily. None of the packaged will taste this good. However, try those labeled "medium" or "medium-firm," or "medium-regular." They may be closer in texture to what you want.<br><br><br><br>
I don't buy this often, actually. I usually use super-firm tofu. I prefer the kind prepared with nigari. "Soy Power, Super Firm" is the brand I buy, wrapped in plastic; not in the plastic tubs.
 

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Ahrk! I miss the Tofu I grew up with now.....back in China, I used to go to the farmers market and buy freshly-made (still hot!) tofu from those nice and humble Tofu-makers <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> . I went so often that they gave my extra chunks for free<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"> . Even after I came to the states, the Tofu makers were still asking my mom about me and mom would tell me about how they are doing and all that......I don't eat much tofu here b/c they don't taste !<br><br><br><br>
dvmarie, you are indeed lucky to be in Japan!!!
 

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I never knew tofu was so complicated!!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/huh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":confused:"> lol It sure makes me hungry learning all about it!!
 
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