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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok. I finally tried this last night. Yesterday morning I marinated a block in sesame ginger sauce. I get ready to cook it and read the receipe books that I got from the library and they all say to press it and then marinate it. I didn't do that so maybe that's why I really didn't like it that much. I stir fried some veggies and cooked some brown rice and mixed it all up with the toffu. If it wasn't for the other stuff I wouldn't have ate the toffu. Anyhow....<br><br><br><br>
Just what do them mean by pressing the toffu? The one I bought was in a box and really didn't have any liquid with it (like I read in the books that it may have).<br><br><br><br>
Any suggestions on how to get better results????
 

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When I press tofu, I generally slice it up into whatever size pieces I'm going to be using, and lay it out on a layer of paper towels on a cookie sheet, and then place another layer of paper towels on top. Then, I place something flat and heavy on top of the "tofu sandwich". (Like a glass casserole dish with some cans placed in it, or some such thing.)<br><br><br><br>
This allows the fluid in the tofu to soak into the paper towels, which allows the tofu to absorb more flavoring from whatever marinade you use.<br><br><br><br>
I've heard that pressing, freezing, thawing, marinating, and then cooking tofu contributes to good flavor and texture as well, but I've never tried it.<br><br><br><br>
Finally, if you don't care about lowfat, fried tofu is very tasty. I made tofu tempura on New Years, and it was awesome. ^___^
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by MsRuthieB</i><br><br><b>Just what do them mean by pressing the toffu? The one I bought was in a box and really didn't have any liquid with it (like I read in the books that it may have).</b></div>
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You have silken tofu. It isn't packed in water, but comes in a box. The kind that you have to press is Japanese (I think?) style tofu, and has to be stored in water. Usually before preparing it you press the water out. It might be that the silken tofu doesn't really work well with the recipe you tried.
 

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the water-packed tofu is chinese tofu. it is better for stir-fries and meat-substitutions in foods.<br><br><br><br>
the kind you had, ruthie, was silken-style. it is better used in creamy sauces, creamy soups, tofu "quiches", and desserts.
 

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*nodnods*<br><br><br><br>
I used silken tofu to make a vegan onion dip that was quite tasty.<br><br><br><br>
Somehow, I also managed to successfully use it to make tofu tempura. I had to be very careful, however, as it was very delicate and broke apart easily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oh yes, it was silkie. I admit, it didn't taste very good in the brown rice and veggies. But I bet it would be good dressed up to be rice pudding!<br><br><br><br>
Ah, ya live and learn <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

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i wouldn't have known either.<br><br>
can we get that onion dip recipe? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/lick.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lick:"><br><br><br><br>
i never cook with tofu, too complicated <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"> but for onion dip i might make an exception
 

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Sure, I'll post it as soon as I can find it.
 

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groovy, thanks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 
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