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The first photo is a doodle we drew up. The cob home takes the shape of a spiral, similar to a sea shell or snail shell. I'm still unsure of the window facing North East. This is where the sun starts to rise, but I have heard from other cob builders that you'll lose heat having windows facing North East. I am definite on small windows in the South East and West, and a large window facing South.

As of now, the trench spans 26 foot wide and 26 foot in length. I'm not too certain it's that length and width because I was using my foot to estimate, since their around 10 inches. I'll get exact measurements later....
There will be 2 foot of cob walls on the outside. The entrance will be about three foot wide, depending on the door we find. The living space will be an open concept (with the kitchen counter, couch, and stove), spanning 8-10 feet in length and less than 22 feet wide. The bedroom will be surrounded by 2 foot wide cob wall spiraling inwards creating a nook. The length of the bedroom comes to 17 foot and the width of the bed about 8 foot.
Most likely, the measurements are off, especially considering I was using my feet as measurement. Since writing this post, I have already dug the trench deeper, as well expanding the house another 4 feet.
On a piece of paper, you don't realize how small this house will be until you look at the photos I posted below. Already, we have dug out the trench, which we will be digging deeper about a foot or two. Really the trench I dug is a visual of the shape of the house.

I need to save up money for a small stove to heat the house, which will have a pipe going up the wall out of the roof. In the sketch below, I have the stove up against the wall facing the living space. The wall behind the stove will release heat in the night, making our bedroom warm and cozy.



In the following photos you'll notice a trench in the shape of a half circle. Also notice the four sticks marking the entrance of the house, and one of the sticks represents the wall extending in the house creating the wall for our bedroom.
The square sheet of plastic, you see in the photos, represent the living space where the couch and stove will be placed.













My vision for the home will look similar to Ziggy and April's creation, seen below. Their home was small but efficiently designed to save space. The picture here is the outside, and the second picture is a panoramic of the interior.



I have videos discussing my process for outlining the home and digging the trench here: Digging outline/trench for cob home (video). Also, I have other posts on the topic of cob homes. For more details on cob homes and building houses for free and with all natural materials, click the links here: Constructing our own home: cob building, homesteading, & free materials and COB BUILDING (Straw, clay, & Sand for building DREAM EARTH HOME.

Again, I understand that this is an incredibly TINY home to some people. I grew up in a trailer and a small house with five other people. I usually shared beds and slept on floors. I am used to living in a small conditions. I do not intend to have a shower or toilet in the house either. My only intention with this home is to have somewhere to sleep warmly at night and store food and books.

It's actually liberating to live in a small home because you understand what's most valuable in the home. Possessions are overrated and too many possessions causes a feeling of "weighed" down or you feel like you could never pack up and leave. You'll always worry if someone will rob you of your stuff as well.


Original post @ http://veganslivingofftheland.blogs...d-max=2014-12-19T18:59:00-05:00&max-results=5


-Cassie K, Vegans Living Off the Land
 

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Why do you not want a shower or toilet?
 

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No flesh since 99'
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I would assume you use solar showers and have a outhouse of sorts not connected to the house then?

I think it's great that you are choosing to live a minimalistic lifestyle and I love your idea for a home. In the last year, I have gotten rid of a large percentage of our possessions that were not adding value to our lives in any way. I have not limited myself to "100 items or less" kind of minimalism, rather taking a good look at what gets used, what is enjoyed and what add value to our lives as opposed to clutter. Thankfully, my husband has been pretty supportive of a shift away from materialism over the past few years and the more recent, more drastic reduction in material goods we posses. Curious what type of thought process you are are trying to adhere to with your decision? Also what made you choose to live a less materialistic and more simple lifestyle? For me, it was moving cross country and seeing how much crap we crammed in a uhaul. It disturbed me, and I had to take action, though I have been for several years using all cloth products, trying not to buy items we don't need or replacing items with 'newer' versions until the old ones broke. Unfortunately, my husband would NEVER agree to living in a cob house, RV or communal living (the latter 2 which I have brought up numerous times over the years, especially living in an RV). About the best I can get out of him is agreeing that when we look for a house to get a smaller, older, fixer we can work on as a project to make more eco-friendly. Curious if you have a spouse or partner and how they feel about this? Supportive or resistant? Thanks for sharing and I hope you keep us updated!
 

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I am jealous. I saw a documentary on tiny houses and a few youtube videos and I have been inspired. I have very few possesions, but live in a too large space. However, I cannot find a micro apartments (smallest apartment I've seen is 400sq ft) in my city and all the rooming houses are in drug infested areas. I hear Vancouver has micro apartments, so I might consider moving there after school.
 

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Nice, I dream of creating my own little sustainable earth house one day. People like you posting up ideas and images help to get the wheels turning about different ideas that one may not have thought of on their own.

I would use some modern materials, but overall should be off the grid. Main thing would have to be close to a natural water source for various reasons - which it looks like you have there!

I for one would like to figure out a way to run water piping off the stove for radiant style heating, and hot water/steam availability for cleaning and showers.

I am also considering alternative ways to dispose of human (and dog, lol) waste without having a water - fed toilet.
 
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