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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Some fan bases tend to be loyal. Country fans are one, and I'd say rock fans are another. On the other hand, some fan bases aren't very loyal. Mainstream top 40 artists have this problem. Big one day but they can't keep up their popularity. Sarah Mclachlan, Jewel, Sheryl Crow, and Alanis Morisette are a few examples. More recent examples would include Christina Aguilera, Hillary Duff, and it appears Avril Lavigne. Why is it that some fan bases are much more loyal than others?
 

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Speak for yourself. Jewel, Alanis Morisette, and pretty much any of the Liz Phair ladies are on heavy rotation in my house. And always will be, I'm sure. I love me some 90's women.
 

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I don't know how you can consider yourself familiar with a whole fan base that can consist of tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands or millions of people (the size of the fan base that the craptastic artists you mentioned might have), and then make some quantitative judgment about how loyal it is.
 

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I also find it interesting how you only mention female artists. Could this be evidence of an internalized gender bias that buys into the cultural belief that women can't make 'serious' (whatever that is) music?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
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Originally Posted by Kibbleforlola View Post

Speak for yourself. Jewel, Alanis Morisette, and pretty much any of the Liz Phair ladies are on heavy rotation in my house. And always will be, I'm sure. I love me some 90's women.
Maybe in some households but as far as mainstream music goes you don't hear them anymore. They're not requested very much these days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
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Originally Posted by Sevenseas View Post

I don't know how you can consider yourself familiar with a whole fan base that can consist of tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands or millions of people (the size of the fan base that the craptastic artists you mentioned might have), and then make some quantitative judgment about how loyal it is.
Let's take country. Billy Ray Cyrus was basically a one-hit wonder but I can't think of too many others that have faltered the way pop singers have. It's not the case with all fans but in general there are some fan bases that are more loyal than others.
 

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Some artists remain popular; others do not. Such is life. Why frame it in terms of fan bases and their loyalty?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
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Originally Posted by Kibbleforlola View Post

I also find it interesting how you only mention female artists. Could this be evidence of an internalized gender bias that buys into the cultural belief that women can't make 'serious' (whatever that is) music?
Most of my favorite singers are female. Pop music is dominated more by females than males so it would make sense that those in my list were female.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
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Originally Posted by Sevenseas View Post

Some artists remain popular; others do not. Such is life. Why frame it in terms of fan bases and their loyalty?
Even in the 1980's many artists enjoyed longevity. Mariah Carey was the only one I can think of who came out in the 1990's and enjoyed longevity. You had very few in the 2000's as well. I find the differences very odd and would like to know why people feel it is this way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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Originally Posted by RabbitLuvr View Post

Not because I like her less, but because things aren't really done like that now.
What does this mean? Regarding Poi Dog Pondering, are these 2,000 seats that they're selling out or 10,000? It makes a big difference. I never said any musician has lost their fan base completely but if you were being played frequently on radio and aren't being played later in your career, it probably means a decent portion of your fan base has gone elsewhere.
 

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The fanbases you refer to as loyal generally tend to include a lot more 'outsider' teens who devote themselves to a relatively static set of trends, while being more accessible musically (as in, easier to start a rock band than to get taken seriously as a DIY boy band).
 

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Originally Posted by rainforests1 View Post

Even in the 1980's many artists enjoyed longevity. Mariah Carey was the only one I can think of who came out in the 1990's and enjoyed longevity. You had very few in the 2000's as well. I find the differences very odd and would like to know why people feel it is this way.
Weird, I really don't know **** about Mariah Carey, but if I need to name pop singers who I think are very popular and listened to with longevity, Mariah Carey isn't the first name that comes to mind.

I still don't know how you are evaluating the longevity, or the loyalty of fan base, for any given artist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
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Originally Posted by Kappa View Post

The fanbases you refer to as loyal generally tend to include a lot more 'outsider' teens who devote themselves to a relatively static set of trends, while being more accessible musically (as in, easier to start a rock band than to get taken seriously as a DIY boy band).
Maybe I'm far off with this, but I thought it was more because pop fans are a bit younger than other fan bases. It's nice that you tried to answer the question.
 

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Originally Posted by rainforests1 View Post

Maybe I'm far off with this, but I thought it was more because pop fans are a bit younger than other fan bases. It's nice that you tried to answer the question.
I don't know that pop fans are generally younger. I think it's just the demographic that each appeal to. Generally, heavy metal is a more tight knit community than, say, mainstream RnB which will attract clubbers from a wider range of backgrounds. Add to this that 'pop' is a very broad term whereas rock, metal, punk have their own mythology almost.
 

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I think rock is the same way, some bads have a loyal folowing and others die off into oblivion. You have Metalica that lives on forever but many other bands were one hit wonders (does anyone listen to Sugar Ray anymore?). It just may be a bias for the top 40 crowd because they have such a huge fan base, it is noticble when it drops off. Some bads, like Vader, never had a huge fan base or sold out arenas but those that listen to them are loyal. I don;t know much about Alanis or Jewel but they may still have a solid fan base just smaller than when they were top 40.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
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Originally Posted by DarkwingDuckie View Post

You have Metalica that lives on forever but many other bands were one hit wonders (does anyone listen to Sugar Ray anymore?).
I thought the hits Sugar Ray had would be considered pop rather than rock. They did get played on mainstream stations when I listened to it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rainforests1 View Post

Some fan bases tend to be loyal. Country fans are one, and I'd say rock fans are another. On the other hand, some fan bases aren't very loyal. Mainstream top 40 artists have this problem. Big one day but they can't keep up their popularity. Sarah Mclachlan, Jewel, Sheryl Crow, and Alanis Morisette are a few examples. More recent examples would include Christina Aguilera, Hillary Duff, and it appears Avril Lavigne. Why is it that some fan bases are much more loyal than others?
I'm disappointed no one has given a nod to:

 
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