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I found this article through <a href="http://www.veganporn.com" target="_blank">www.veganporn.com</a> (hilarious website - check it out).<br><br><br><br>
Apparently, scientists are shocked to find out that exercising "works like a drug" to prevent heart disease (HUH??). As veganporn.com put it, "Just like eating less works like a diet pill."<br><br><br><br>
The kicker, though? After making this remarkable discovery by studying humans (who, I'm told at least, are identical to us biologically), the scientists want to start researching these results on animals to make sure they're accurate. (DOUBLE HUH??)<br><br><br><br>
I mean, come on... Clearly such controversial results such as "exercise is good for you" must be confirmed by torturing animals whose bodies are biologically different than ours, right? (end sarcasm)<br><br><a href="http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/breaking_news/5016126.htm" target="_blank">http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansas...ws/5016126.htm</a><br><br><br><br><i>Breaking News<br><br>
Posted on Thu, Jan. 23, 2003<br><br>
Exercise Like a Drug in Heart Disease, Study Finds<br><br>
Reuters<br><br><br><br>
WASHINGTON - Exercise can act like a drug on the blood vessels, reducing the risk of heart disease by literally getting the blood flowing, U.S. researchers said on Thursday.<br><br><br><br>
It works in a surprising way, reducing inflammation, which has recently joined high blood pressure and high cholesterol as a leading known cause of heart disease, the researchers said.<br><br><br><br>
The blood stresses the walls of blood vessels as it passes over them, reducing inflammation in a way similar to high doses of steroids, the researchers report in Friday's issue of Circulation Research.<br><br><br><br>
"Inflammation in blood vessels has been linked to atherosclerosis, a hardening of the arteries, and here we see how the physical force of blood flow can cause cells to produce their own anti-inflammatory response," Scott Diamond of the University of Pennsylvania's Institute for Medicine and Engineering, said in a statement.<br><br><br><br>
"Conceivably, exercise provides the localized benefits of glucocorticoids -- just as potent as high doses of steroids, yet without all the systemic side effects of taking the drugs themselves," added Diamond, who led the study.<br><br><br><br>
"Perhaps this is a natural way in which exercise helps protect the vessels, by stimulating an anti-inflammatory program when the vessels are exposed to elevated blood flow."<br><br><br><br>
The findings could help explain why exercise works so well to reduce the risk of heart disease, Diamond said.<br><br><br><br>
"We're not talking about running a marathon here. We're just talking about getting the blood moving at high arterial levels," he said.<br><br><br><br>
Studies in recent years have found that cells and chemicals linked with inflammation can be found in arterial clogs, and much research is now focusing on ways to reduce this inflammation. For instance, teams are investigating whether giving patients antibiotics or anti-inflammatory drugs lowers their risk of heart disease.<br><br><br><br>
Diamond has worked using human arteries in the lab but wants to move into animals to confirm his hypothesis.<br><br><br><br>
"Think of blood flow as a stream -- whenever a stream branches off you get small areas of recirculation eddies or pools of stagnant water," he said.<br><br><br><br>
"These same situations of disturbed flow irritate the endothelium (the lining of the blood vessels). When blood vessels branch off, all the arterial flotsam -- fats and activated blood cells -- can clump and stick at these hot spots for atherosclerotic plaque formation," he added.<br><br><br><br>
"Perhaps, elevated blood flow may alter these disease-prone regions to relieve some of the localized inflammation."</i>
 

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Heh, it should be said that some drugs work like exercise on the blood vessels.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by Mera'din</i><br><br><b>I found this article through <a href="http://www.veganporn.com" target="_blank">www.veganporn.com</a> (hilarious website - check it out).<br><br><br><br>
Apparently, scientists are shocked to find out that exercising "works like a drug" to prevent heart disease (HUH??). As veganporn.com put it, "Just like eating less works like a diet pill."<br><br>
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Huh ?<br><br><br><br>
Im not a intellectual, but I thought this was general knowledge.<br><br>
Frequent running or exercise releases endorphin in the body and gives sort of natural high.<br><br>
Stimulation the body is a good thing.<br><br>
Over here they have a running program to help people cope with depression.<br><br>
Frequent running (in a group) reactivates people.<br><br>
Its a accepted therapy over here..<br><br><br><br><br><br>
I'd like to check the site, but I can't bc the P-word in the url....
 

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"Frequent running or exercise releases endorphin in the body and gives sort of natural high."<br><br><br><br>
I pretty sure this is pure conjecture. People noticed that they got a good feeling after running, and hypothesized that maybe it was due to release of endorphins. But I don't think any actual measurement of endorphins or even observation of anything that suggests endorphines, has ever been done. It's just conjecture. It is not "general knowledge." It is general conjecture.<br><br><br><br>
Furthermore, I occaisionally take large amounts of the non-endogenous chemicals that were in use for thousands of years before physiologists discovered that endorphins work on the same receptors that these drugs work on -- and never get the least bit high as a result. So even the conjecture that endorphins cause one to feel "high" -- is nothing but conjecture.<br><br><br><br>
Bull****, bull****, bull****.<br><br><br><br>
All that is really know for sure is that certain endogenous chemicals work on the same receptors as chemicals produced by certain plants, or that are manufactured in other ways, and resemble these natural phytochemicals.
 

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I'm quite willing to believe that running makes people feel good. But whether it is due to endorphins is just pure conjecture. Sounds plausible, but it's unproven.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/huh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":confused:"><br><br><br><br>
I might be wrong, but running is a (big) part of some treatments for depression. Well it is here.<br><br>
If the government pays for it, there should be some thruth in it ( I hope)<br><br><br><br>
Maybe I got the hormone names mixed up.....<br><br><br><br>
(Eitherway: I'll have to see the dictionary for "conjecture")
 

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1vegan, I'll save you a trip to the dictionary: a conjecture is a guess or hypothesis.
 
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