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I found the idea of the switch incredibly hard at first. Now that I'm on the "other side" I don't know how to explain it. I think I was using cheese as a "meat substitute," and I couldn't imagine how to get beyond that. Luckily I've been a longtime fan of "ethnic/exotic" foods, so I just stepped up my consumption of them.

Here's what I did (although this may not be so easy for you, living with parents): I went to the grocery and said to myself, "There is no budget limitation. I am going to buy every single vegan thing that appeals to me." I went up and down every aisle to see what I could find. Suddenly I found myself with a fridge and a cupboard full of things that I hadn't had in ages, even though I liked them. (For example, I've always loved curries but never bothered to make any for myself.) And a bunch of new things as well.

I don't know if this helps at all, but my approach was, "Yay, what yummy things can I eat?" instead of allowing myself to think about what I was not eating.

I'm still having fun with the experimentation!
 

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I was about to ask the same thing.

Should I just avoid all 'dairy' drinks (like coffee, tea) and recipes until I can stomach Soy milk or the like?

I bought Soy Cream Cheese yesterday ate a teaspoon of it and literally threw up - it tastes like play dough. Soy still doesn't appeal to me - even the flavoured stuff.
Maybe I wasn't made to be vegan. I just can't imagine ever liking - let alon loving - these replacements so maybe I just need to stop trying to replace it?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by thefragile77

I bought Soy Cream Cheese yesterday ate a teaspoon of it and literally threw up - it tastes like play dough.
Was that the Kingland brand? That stuff is disgusting. The Tofutti soy cream cheese is nice (in my opinion). The only place I know where to get it is at Woolworths in Glenmore Park (near Penrith).
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Kurmudgeon

Was that the Kingland brand? That stuff is disgusting. The Tofutti soy cream cheese is nice (in my opinion). The only place I know where to get it is at Woolworths in Glenmore Park (near Penrith).
Yep Kingland
Yech that was horrible I still can't get over the taste. I'll try Glenmore Park then that's not too far to go -esp. considering I do most of my shopping in Surry Hills near work at the moment.
 

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I found it really easy, but that was a factor of living in a veg-friendly city like LA, and really being invested emotionally and intellectually in my reasons for switching.
 

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If you take inbetween steps it's probably easier. Or at least for me it was. I first wasn't even really planning on going vegan any time soon, I just kept going and ended up here (not that I didn't want to be vegan, but I wasn't really planning on it). First I went lacto-vegetarian, I found it easier to avoid eggs as the first thing. And it worked quite well. Then I started avoiding gelatin, which was harder because I like Haribo gummybears so much, but within a week or so I was used to that way of eating already. Then I started avoding milk by itself (in the glass and such) and yogurt by itself. I wouldn't it as an ingredient in bread for example. Then I started avoiding cheese, which wasn't hard, because I'm not a cheese lover really. Then I started cutting down on all the other products that i still ate that had dairy as an ingredient, such as bread with whey, or chips with cheese flavoring. Then after a long struggle, I finally gave up honey as well. Man, this was all over a couple of months, so I really gave myself enough time to get used to every small change I made. When I look back. I don't think I ever really had a problem with wanting to go back. I just looked forward at all the food I could still eat (which is A LOT). Then I started hearing about the Vitamin D3, and cut that out too, and later I discovered more good and cheap shampoos and things like that that are vegan. I don't buy clothes very often so I don't know aobut that. But I had tried going vegan cold-turkey before that, several times, and everytime I failed. I think a gradual change is much easier ( I didn't even really have to TRY, I just did it).

Good luck!
 

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I thought it was pretty easy. Although, I did it gradually. At first I said, let me see if I can go one day eating totally vegan. And I did, and it was yummy and satisfying. So I said, "okay.. soon as I finish out all this cream cheese in the fridge, I'll give this a whirl..." So I cut out the obvious things like milk and cheese. Then after a while I started being careful about whey and stuff like that. Then after maybe five months or so I cut out honey. You definetely just need to take it slowly. Eliminating small things one at a time isn't too hard.
 

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i found it hard at first, since i was 12 when I went vegetarian. I wasn't completely sure what I was doing. But after a while, I got used to all the changes that I'd had to make. I ate quite a lot of meat beforehand as well, so I probably found it hard because of that.
 

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I switched cold turkey. One day I was a confirmed meat eater, the next day Vegan. I have had to work through a few things regarding my stance on certain "vegan" items, but it has been 4 months now, and I haven't gone back - in fact, I have become more strict.

I think that it was easier giving up everything at once because I have found that certain foods "trigger" others. I find that meat triggers milk and cheese, and that certain combos trigger meat cravings.

One thing that I have found very interesting is that, in giving up all animal product, I no longer crave simple carbs - well, not very much. My Mom, who ate Macrobiotic for a long time, told me that, in Macrob. meat and dairy are one extreme, while refined carbs are the other. Since the body is always trying to get into a place of "neutral" if you eat one extreme, you crave the opposite extreme.

Anyway, when I switched to Veg*n, I found it to be much easier than the times that I just tried to go lacto-ovo. Eating eggs and cheese makes it so that I just am unable to go veggie.

Just my experience.
 

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i found the idea of the switch really hard, but the actual switch to be really damn easy

when i switched to veganism, i cut out white sugar, white flour, and white rice too

and still it wasnt hard

the hardest part of it was that i had to drive so far to get decent substitutes. and there wasnt nearly as much stuff out there as there is today. this was 5 years ago.

the only soy milk i could get was soy dream in that aspectic packaging, the bread was all disgusting, the ice cream was rice dream (which sucks)

i actually had to eat lots of salads and veggies... and without dressing! unless i wanted olive oil and vinegar, which i hate

nowadays theres so many awesome subsitutes... and theres so much you can buy in your local grocery store

in my trashy neighborhood store i can pick up those vegan eggplant tv dinners, soy delicious ice cream, silk soy milk, and a bunch of other awesome stuff, including gimme lean sausage and the yves fake turkey

there seems to be vegan substitutes for almost everything, and theres so many vegan restaurants or at least vegan friendly restaurants

heh, you dont even have to settle for nayonaise anymore, because there is vegenaise, which actually takes like what i remember mayo to taste like

where are you from, tofu rebel?

i wish you luck on the switch, if/when you make it



Caroline
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
i'm in the UK, Caroline
. and thanks.

what i find hard about it - i don't have a problem with the craving of dairy products, not at all; in fact i can't wait to give them up cuz they give me so much catarrh - it's all the vitamins and stuff that you need to get. i've been researching it for what...a few months? and i still haven't got it all. ideally, i need to come up with a two week plan of meals so that i can get all the nutrients i need but i'm finding it so hard to include it all. and all the little chemicals that they sneak into foods - like there's glycerol in the brown sugar we have, but i only realised that after i used it in cooking at ate it
. just things like that. it seems like i can eat hardly anything. there's even beta-carotene and things like that in orange juice (for example. i drink water anyway).
 

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i wouldnt worry about making mistakes...

talk to other vegans from the UK... find out what brand orange juice they drink


mistakes are bound to happen, they happen to All of us at one point or another

too much emphasis is made on vegans lacking vitamins and nutrients... i seriously am the most unhealthy vegan, see the unhealthy vegan thread....

but since i went vegan from vegetarian, all my nutrients and stuff levels have all been perfect

and thats without taking a multivitamin

if youre worried about nutrition, take a multivitamin...

just subsitute what you ate before for vegan things

i used to eat kraft mac & cheese, now i eat road ends organic mac & chreese...

its easy to substitute

good luck!



Caroline
 

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I think I would agree with most people here, is that it's easier cutting down on one thing at a time.

I cut out all the super fattening dairy stuff first. Sweets (anything with butter like croissants) cheese cake, and ice cream, (but that's just me) and started to buy dried fruits as sweet snacks instead. Dried mangoes are the bomb.

I've been "off" milk for a very long time, cause I always thought it was gross.

The only thing that I still eat dairy-wise is cheese, but I eat less and less of that all the time, and really only goat cheese.

"Silk" soy milk is great. I highly suggest buying it if you've not tried it. It stays mixed up in coffee, instead of separating and sinking to the bottom like all the other soy milks. It's good to drink plain too.

I agree that's it's sooooo much easier to go veggie/vegan now, that I don't know why everyone doesn't do it.

Here's my list of suggestions that are vegan:

Burritos--

-----or anything Mexican (tvp tacos, veggie fajitas...)

Mediterranean foods----

-----falafel, hummous, stuffed grape leaves, salads with a ton of stuff on them, roasted veggie pita sandwiches, olives, spinach pies (w/o feta)...

Asian foods----

-----stir frys (endless ideas for that), steamed veggie dumplings, fried seasoned tofu, garlic string beans, broccoli & tofu...

Thai foods of all kinds

Indian foods of all kinds

Cajun foods----red beans and rice

I think it's important to make sure you eat plenty of fruits and veggies, and not be a Carbohydrate Vegan.
 

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Also, if you like curry, then most indian restaurants are very vegetarian friendly, since indian cuisine is influenced by a culture which frowns upon meat.

There's this really cool place in Blackpool, and they do an awesome vegetarian rogan josh. If I had money, I'd go there more often!
 

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Nothing that I know of! I was going to comment on that myself!

Beta-Carotene is a provitamin, which means that we need it to convert to Vitamin A. The only way to get straight-up vitamin A is to eat animals, or milk products and eggs. Those products contain vitamin A because their bodies already converted provitamins into vitamin A for us (besides, if we had to avoid betacarotene, we'd have to avoid my horns! (see my avatar)).

If you're a vegan, you'll have to convert the provitamins yourself.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by mikie

Nothing that I know of! I was going to comment on that myself!

Beta-Carotene is a provitamin, which means that we need it to convert to Vitamin A. The only way to get straight-up vitamin A is to eat animals, or milk products and eggs. Those products contain vitamin A because their bodies already converted provitamins into vitamin A for us (besides, if we had to avoid betacarotene, we'd have to avoid my horns! (see my avatar)).

If you're a vegan, you'll have to convert the provitamins yourself.
I didn't think there was anything wrong with it (b-c).

<edited>

I just read something that said beta-carotene can be animal derived (www.vnv.org.au) but surely in orange juice it would be plant derived i.e. from Carrots?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
My switch to vegan was gradual. I educated myself with books from the library about vegan nutrition, social problems, and cooking at home. I had been a vegetarian for a few months, and I just decided to take the extra step to vegan. Although my parents are omnis, they eat tons of tofu because they're on high-protein, low carb diets. Prior to going vegetarian, we had lots of soy products in the house just because they taste good! When eating out with my friends, while making the transition to vegan, I would just ask for a salad without chicken and cheese, or I'd eat french fries or spaghetti. Even when going out for pizza, I could order mine without cheese without people questioning me, because I've never really liked cheese and my friends are used to me picking it off. I love cooking new vegan foods from The Garden of Vegan for my family and friends and showing them how tasty it is to be vegan! The switch wasn't painful at all!
 
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