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http://www.theatlantic.com/life/arch...arming/244063/

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I know a factory farmer named Bill. His Texas ranch raises upwards of 4,000 head of cattle in a way that typifies industrial animal agriculture. Cows are numbered, not named. Animals don't eat food, they convert feed. The ultimate goal couldn't be more straightforward: raise cows as quickly, efficiently, and safely as possible; transform them into well-marbled cuts of beef; and, throughout the process, minimize inputs while maximizing outputs.

What does Bill think about his vocation? He absolutely loves it. Factory farming has afforded him a life in the country, an opportunity to raise his family in a rural environment, and an income healthy enough to send his kids to prestigious colleges. When I recently challenged Bill on the ethics of industrial agriculture, he smiled and shook his head, insisting that the cows he fattened and slaughtered were of no more moral worth than the iron grates that enclosed them.

Bill is an emotionally aware person who gives the impression of a quiet academic. He has a warm smile, and is as likely to be found reading the New Yorker as Horse and Livestock. As he sees it, a factory farm simply makes good business sense, much as an assembly line does for fabricating cars. Consolidation is a logical response to economic incentives.

But I think Bill misses a critical point. True, even without subsidies, there might indeed be economic advantages to raising animals under intensive conditions. But we should never fail to overlook the psychological implications of something as emotionally charged as killing animals for food. And when it comes to this endeavor, scale and density of production accomplishes something essential for all factory farming: it severs the emotional bond between farmers and animals. In the bluntest terms, it allows my friend Bill to kill thousands of animals a year and remain a happy person.
This is a great piece. I've often thought about how a person could possibly do that job.
 

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It allows my friend Bill to kill thousands of animals a year and remain a happy person.
IMO, this is truer and creepier and sadder than the idea of someone who ran a factory farm and was morally conflicted about it. Even if they kept doing it, it's just scary to think that someone could be that disconnected.
 

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This is a great piece. I've often thought about how a person could possibly do that job.
Economic amorality, that's how. I disagree that it "severs the emotional bond between farmers and animals" because that never existed. They're emotionally bonded to the process, not the equipment.
 

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It is a good piece actually.

the writer is not afraid to be blunt. I believe the AR movement probably needs more people with outspoken attitudes instead of all this candy arse sugar coating that has been going on.
 

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This is an excellent article. Food for thought for veggies and omnis alike.
 

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Originally Posted by sorrowthepig View Post

Economic amorality, that's how. I disagree that it "severs the emotional bond between farmers and animals" because that never existed. They're emotionally bonded to the process, not the equipment.
100% agree. And yet how many of those same people would argue that they 'love' the animals they imprison? We humans have an amazing ability to rationalize. Maybe that is the real difference between humans and animals. We rationalize, they just 'are'.
 

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I used to work in one of those intensive production environments at one time.

An overcrowded dirty polluted misery pit it was. Full of dumb creatures, many living their entire lives in nowt much more that little boxes stacked high upon each other.

Every day I got to watch the livestock trucked in to their stalls for their fleecings and milkings. Tired, miserable, heads always down, avoiding eye contact with each other.

Nasty species they kept there, mind. The type of creatures who, so long as they could benefit from even worse exploitation and misery of others, could cope with their own misery and exploitation - even to the level of some delusionary degree of happiness.

Beautifull place to visit but a horrible place to have to live in, is London.
 
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