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I just got the keys to my new (to me) apartment and it has a gas range! I've never had one before, so I'm really clueless on how they work. I was cleaning the range today and realized that the top is warm, even when the burners are not on - is this normal? What else do I need to know about it?<br><br>
Thanks!
 

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You are so lucky!!! You now have instant heat control at your fingertips, something I would give a lot of money for! I grew up cooking on gas, and I have never fully adjusted to electric, even after 10 years of apartment living.<br><br><br><br>
I believe the warm top is probably normal. Gas ranges have a pilot light, a small flame that burns all the time so that you can turn on the stove with a simple twist. But in the house I grew up in, the pilot light was always turned off because my mom didn't like it (thought it was a waste of gas), so for decades I didn't even know there was such a thing. We just lit the stove with a match. If you're uncomfortable with the idea of a small flame burning there all the time, you should be able to turn it off. To light the stove, just light a match, hold it in the vicinity of the burner, and turn the knob, and the stove will poof into lovely blue life.<br><br><br><br>
As for other things you need to know... if there's a ceiling fan in your kitchen, it can play havoc with the flame. Not to the point that it's dangerous or anything, but it can make it kind of hard to cook.
 

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<span style="color:#008000;">I did all my learning to cook on a gas stove. Now I live in a place that has electric, and I miss my gas range so much. You have so much more control over the temperature with gas.<br><br>
Once you get used to the pilot lights/or lighting the burners and the little differences, I bet you will grow to love cooking with gas.</span>
 

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Yay! Gas stove! I hate electric :\\ I like to SEE how high the fire is for cooking. You should know to be careful about dropping spaghetti near the flame or letting kitchen towels/recipes etc... get too close cause they'll set on fire <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/blush.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":eek:"><br><br><br><br>
You should know that if you're turning the stove knob to light it and it's going "click click click click click" but it isn't LIGHTING, turn it off and wait a minute or so to let the gas dissipate or you get a big FWOOM! and the fire goes up high for a second... (I've burned off arm hair like that!)... or your kitchen stinks like gas. But if you aren't using the stove and it kinda smells like gas, but the pilot is still lit, then don't worry cause if there was a gas leak everything would have exploded by then.<br><br><br><br>
Hmm... this is just like the "bad things that can happen with gas ranges" response isn't it??<br><br><br><br>
Really though, it's the best for cooking. I promise.
 

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Overall I love cooking with gas, but after using electric for such a long time there are things I had to learn.<br><br><br><br>
1. Do not put plastic salt and pepper shakers near the burners. We used to keep our plastic salt and pepper shakers on or the burners of our elextric range. Since the pots covered the elements, there was never enough radiated heat to melt them. However with the space between the flame and the pots on the gas range, the heat escapes sideways and we now have two slightly distorted salt and pepper shakers.<br><br><br><br>
2. Consider getting a heat difuser. I've found that although gas gives one more control overall, it concentrates the heat where the flames hit the pot as opposed to spreading it out more like the electric burner did. I find it easier to scorch food on the gas range. If you have thick enough pots or copper clad pots, this might not be an issue for you.
 

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I bought a new gas stove when I moved into my house last year. It doesn't use a pilot light. Instead it uses a small electrical current for ignition.<br><br><br><br>
Really, a gas stove is just about the greatest thing ever.<br><br><br><br>
If your oven is gas (many gas stoves have electric ovens) don't store your cast iron pan in it. It'll rust because one of the by-products of combustion is water.<br><br><br><br>
If you have an exhaust fan above your gas stove, please use it whenever you cook. I find the exhaust from the stove unpleasant when I don't.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>cookingVeg</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I bought a new gas stove when I moved into my house last year. It doesn't use a pilot light. Instead it uses a small electrical current for ignition.</div>
</div>
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Most of the newer ones don't have pilot lights, but Sally says the top of hers feels warm, so I'd guess it's a pilot light model. If it makes a clicking noise when you turn the knob, that's the sound of an electric ignition. If you don't have the clicking, look underneath in the top of the oven, or open the top of the stove and peer down under where the burners are. Somewhere in there you should be able to spot the small blue glow of the pilot. How to turn it off is a different matter-- it's been so long since I've dealt with a gas stove that I'm not sure how you go about turning it off.
 

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Gas stoves are wonderful for roasting chili peppers on. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/yes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":yes:"><br><br><br><br>
Everyone else has pretty much covered the rest.
 

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On the ones that have a live pilot light, it usually sits between the burners. Ususally you can see it back under the lid of the stove. To check for a leak in your line, take a slolution of dishwashing liquid and water and put it on the line, it make bubbles where it is leaking. Put bubble gum over the leak and call the service man. If you smell gas, always check to see if the pilot is lit in old stoves. Just stick a match back under there and light the pilot. When you deal with gas, remember you always have the flame ready before you turn the gas knob. Unless you like being a hairless wonder.<br><br><br><br>
I'm with the rest. Once you are used to it, you will love cooking with gas. Instant response in temp control. Things to remember. Keep your cooking area clear of extra "fuel". Oil, paper towels, clothes, hair, arms, overflowing food, small children. Remember, Oil fires are not put out with water, but must be smothered. Keep a kitchen fire extingisher close by at all times.<br><br><br><br>
Good luck and enjoy.
 

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Wow, you guys were *not* kidding. It's so much more fun to cook on a gas range! Amazing! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/blush.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":eek:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>SallyK</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Wow, you guys were *not* kidding. It's so much more fun to cook on a gas range! Amazing! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/blush.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":eek:"></div>
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I have one, too. Aren't they great? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> It's good to see that you like using it!
 

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Yeah I grew up learning to cook on an electric stove also and I love gas stoves now, especially since my gas is free in my new apartment! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 
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