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i've read some stuff that says that people looking to reduce the negative effects a high-salt diet has on their bodies, should switch to sea salt, because it reacts differently in your system, due, in part, to the trace minerals that are left in it; unlike your typical refined table salt.<br><br><br><br>
i can't find the page i read it on, but it claimed that sea salt won't contribute to high blood pressure, etc. the same way iodized table salt will.<br><br><br><br>
since it was only one page on the web, and i can't seem to find anything else to back this claim up, i'm wondering if any one here has information about it?<br><br><br><br>
i only ever use sea salt because i prefer the flavour to regular table salt, and because i found out that most table salts have a <b>sugar</b> added to them (check the list of ingredients on a box of the stuff!).
 

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Kreeli, you might find this article helpful....<br><br><br><br><br><br>
This is from Vegetarian Times:<br><br><br><br>
MINED (REGULAR) SALT and solar (sea) salt come from different places, but by the time they make it to your grocery shelf, they are practically identical in every way, including nutritional value. (Unprocessed sea salt is a slightly different story--more on that later.) All salt originates in the ocean, which has covered different parts of the earth over time. But because some ancient seas have dried up and become covered with sediment, there are now salt deposits beneath the earth's surface.<br><br><br><br>
Whether it comes from the sea or the earth, table salt is made through the process of evaporation. In the case of solar salt, sea water is put into shallow outdoor basins and allowed to evaporate until salt crystals emerge; in mined salt, water is pumped into salt mines to create a well of brine, which is then pumped into indoor vessels and heated until, once again, salt crystals emerge. Impurities are filtered, iodine and anti-caking agents are sometimes added, and--voila--table salt that is about 99 percent sodium chloride. Hain Sea Salt, for instance, is 99.99 percent sodium chloride, .005 percent calcium sulfate, .003 percent magnesium chloride and .002 percent sodium sulfate. (Federal standards require that all salt sold for table salt be at least 97.5 percent sodium chloride.)<br><br><br><br>
Sodium is a necessary nutrient, one that helps maintain proper water balance and blood pH, as well as stomach, nerve and muscle function. Salt is a good source of sodium, but simple math indicates that it really isn't a good source of anything else, especially in the small quantities that people normally consume. Still, some extol the virtues of sea salt, heralding it for the trace minerals that are found in sea water such as phosphorus, potassium and nitrogen, among others. But most sea salt (even the stuff sold in health food stores), is every bit as refined as mined salt, so the bulk of the trace minerals are processed out--a fact that is even recognized by some sea salt advocates such as Christiane Northrup, M.D., a physician specializing in women's health and editor of the newsletter "Health Wisdom for Women." Northrup, a strong proponent of the health benefits of minerals in sea salt, orders unprocessed Celtic sea salt through the Grain and Salt Society (14351 Wycliff Way, P.O. Box DD, Magalia, CA 95994; [916] 872-5800) for $56 per pound (less for members) and encourages her readers to do the same.<br><br><br><br>
Is it worth it? Robert L. Wolke, Ph.D., a professor emeritus of chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh who has studied salt extensively, says no. "In the quantities you use either in cooking or at the table, the amount you would get of these trace minerals is utterly negligible," says Wolke. "You'd have to eat a quarter pound of ocean solids [processed sea salt] to equal the amount of iron in a single grape or two pounds to equal the amount of phosphorus in that grape." Wolke does say that there are significant amounts of calcium and magnesium in unprocessed sea salt--enough so that he doesn't even consider them "trace" minerals--but says you'd get more simply by eating green vegetables.<br><br>
Nutrition aside, sea salt does have a place in some chef's kitchens because it can impart a slightly different flavor, depending on its grind. According to Skip Niman, director of quality administration for Cargill Salt, sea salt crystals start out somewhat coarser than mined salt crystals; the larger the crystal, the more "biting" the salt taste. "It's a function of how quickly it dissolves in the palate," Niman says. So if you want coarse salt to grind on top of your focaccia, sea salt is the way to go.
 

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my take on sea salt is that. yes, the trace elements are nice (like in sucanat), but largely why i see it better to use sea salt is that it doesn't require strip mining the earth (baaad).<br><br><br><br>
i never fooled myself into thinking that i'm getting TONS more nutrtive value from either...but hey...its also in the back of my mind.<br><br><br><br>
if you are considering sea salt, i think it is a good idea to look into an iodine enriched kind. someone can prove me wrong though if they like <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">. i recently learned that flouride in toothpaste is pretty pointless...unless you fancy swallowing toothpaste regularly or can honestly believe that the trace amount left in your saliva after rinsing makes its way into your stomach and provides all you need (i hadn't thought of that until now...hmm).
 

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Wow - thanks Evita. I have officially learned at least one new thing today!!!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Thanks for posting that article. I use sea salt because I prefer the taste over regular table salt, but I have wondered about its nutritional value.
 

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i was wondering - because they take sea water, dry it up to get the sea salt, would it case fatalities of sea life? little living things possibly being at the wrong place at the wrong time, an sufficating when the water dries?<br><br>
maybe people make sure that doesn't happen, buti wouldnt be too surprised if they didn't care.<br><br><br><br>
does anyone know???
 

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Sea salt is great for cleansing crystals and blessing houses. That's about all I know. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Kreeli</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
i've read some stuff that says that people looking to reduce the negative effects a high-salt diet has on their bodies, should switch to sea salt, because it reacts differently in your system, due, in part, to the trace minerals that are left in it; unlike your typical refined table salt.</div>
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Do you have high blood pressure? If not, I wouldn't worry about your salt intake. I have this general impression from a lot of articles I've read; here's one from the American Medical Association <a href="http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/279/17/1383" target="_blank">http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content...ct/279/17/1383</a>.<br><br><br><br>
As to whether sea salt contributes less to high blood pressure in those who are sensitive to salt, it depends. Because sea salt contains other minerals than sodium chloride, it might contain slightly less sodium by weight. This will likely vary depending on where the sea salt is from. If you use a coarser grind, like the flakes in kosher salt, it will contain less sodium by volume since it's less dense. This will only help, though, if you substitute it teaspoon for teaspoon for table salt.
 
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