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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had never heard of it until yesterday, I found some youtube videos on making it, is it worth having a go?<br><br>
Keep in mind I cant have any tofu at the moment, so having a soyfree alternative thought it might be good. Also if its a plain sort of taste might be able to get my kids to eat it...<br><br>
BUT is there any nutritional benefit? Or is it just something to bulk out your meals?
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>nuddle</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2846260"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I had never heard of it until yesterday, I found some youtube videos on making it, is it worth having a go?</div>
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With all due respect, I think you are confusing two different issues here.<br><br>
One is the nutritional or food-value of seitan. Seitan is great. Low in fat, high in protein, wonderful in texture. It has been called "the vegetarian white meat," because it is a wonderful meat substitute.<br><br>
See: <a href="http://www.ehow.com/facts_5290836_nutritional-value-seitan.html" target="_blank">http://www.ehow.com/facts_5290836_nu...ue-seitan.html</a><br><br>
But the second issue is whether you should buy it at the store or make it yourself. One of my friends is the best vegan chef in Nashville, and the former co-owner of one of Nashville's best vegetarian restaurants. I asked her why she never serves seitan at any of her luncheons. She told me that she has tried and tried to make it, but it just never comes out right. So I think you are assuming that it is easy to make, and I think this assumption is incorrect.<br><br>
You can try to make it yourself, and maybe you will be successful where others have failed. But maybe you should try the store-bought kind before leaping in to try to make it yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
lol, fair enough, I am just assuming that the store bought ones (if I can even find it here ) will have soy in it, and I cant eat any amount of soy at the moment...
 

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Truly, it's a wonderful thing. I just had some last night in a stir fry with mustard greens, onions, peppers, and rice.<br><b><br></b>
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
do you make it? Or buy it?
 

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I make it using the recipe in Veganomican. It's not hard to make and it always turns out wonderful! I like it better than any I've bought. I really love it!
 

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I read in another post of yours that you're avoiding soy because your breastfed baby reacts badly to it. Is that just with unfermented soy like soy milk and tofu, or does that include fermented soy like soy sauce/tamari, miso, and tempeh? If you can have fermented soy, then you can use the recipe from Veganomicon <a href="http://www.food.com/recipe/Simple-Seitan-340765" target="_blank">here</a>. Bob's Redmill also has a <a href="http://www.bobsredmill.com/recipes_detail.php?rid=1155" target="_blank">recipe</a> that calls for less soy sauce.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>nuddle</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2846346"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
do you make it? Or buy it?</div>
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I buy it.
 

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You can replace the soy sauce in a recipe with a different liquid. It's not really a major ingredient.<br><br>
Seitan is awesome, but cook your own. The store-bought stuff is meh. And I'd recommend using it in some kind of recipe, instead of just eating plain chunks of seitan.
 

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I use the recipe from Bob's Red Mill (it's on the back of my bag of Vital Wheat Gluten). It only has a few tablespoons of soy sauce, I'm sure you could replace that with something.<br><br>
I've made it a few times and I always found it really easy! It's best if you put it in something, though. My favorite is to make chopped pork-style BBQ by cutting it into tiny pieces and simmering it in homemade BBQ sauce. It's also good in pot pies.
 

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When I make 'white' seitan I replace the soy sauce with an equal amount of additional broth. If your broth isn't salted you'd need to account for that somehow. I don't really do reduced salt myself though so I don't know details.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Mrs. T</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2846701"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I read in another post of yours that you're avoiding soy because your breastfed baby reacts badly to it. Is that just with unfermented soy like soy milk and tofu, or does that include fermented soy like soy sauce/tamari, miso, and tempeh? If you can have fermented soy, then you can use the recipe from Veganomicon <a href="http://www.food.com/recipe/Simple-Seitan-340765" target="_blank">here</a>. Bob's Redmill also has a <a href="http://www.bobsredmill.com/recipes_detail.php?rid=1155" target="_blank">recipe</a> that calls for less soy sauce.</div>
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its all soy...<br><br>
thanks, will have a go at making it
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
any other aussies had luck finding that wheat gluten stuff? I checked in the coles and they didnt have it, but maybe the healthfood store?
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>creep</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2846900"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
You can replace the soy sauce in a recipe with a different liquid. It's not really a major ingredient.<br><br>
Seitan is awesome, but cook your own. The store-bought stuff is meh. And I'd recommend using it in some kind of recipe, instead of just eating plain chunks of seitan.</div>
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+1 - I use the recipe from Vegan w/ a Vengeance.
 

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Joe "With all due respect, I think you are confusing two different issues here... the nutritional... value of seitan, [and] whether you should buy it at the store or make it yourself."<br><br>
What do you mean when you say that you think nuddle might be confusing the nutritional value of seitan with whether s'he should buy it or make it? I can't make any sense of this statement. How would anyone confuse a method of acquiring a substance, with an aspect or characteristic of a substance? That is like saying someone might be confusing the shape of a table with whether they bought the table or made it. It just makes no sense to me. You can buy a square table or a round table. You can make a square table or a round table. No-one gets the shape confused with the method of acquisition.<br><br>
And why are people always confusing seitan with wheat gluten? Wheat gluten is just one of the many ingredients used in making seitan, it is not synonymous with seitan. Wheat gluten is a simple, vegan substance. Seitan is a dish made from a recipe, a major ingredient of which is wheat gluten. It may or may not be vegetarian, and may or may not be vegan. Confusing seitan with wheat gluten is like confusing bread with wheat. How often have you heard someone referring to bread as wheat, as when sitting down to a meal and someone says "could you please pass the wheat." It just doesn't happen. No-one, when asked "what is bread," says "bread is wheat." They say it is a food product made from wheat. So why when asked "what is seitan," do people say "seitan is wheat gluten." It isn't wheat gluten, any more than bread is just wheat.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>rashelle</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2847321"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Yeah, where can you find the vital wheat gluten?</div>
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You should be able to find small boxes of it near the flour in your local supermarket. A lot of people who make homemade bread use it in their bread recipes, so it's usually where you will find the flour and yeast. You can usually buy larger packages of it in health food stores. Sometimes you can find the larger bags in regular supermarkets.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">why are people always confusing seitan with wheat gluten</div>
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'Gluten' is the protein found in wheat flour. Wash the starch out and boil/steam/bake/whatever it, you have seitan. Usually it's flavored or seasoned somehow, but I don't see why it'd have to be (in fact it isn't always). If you make a bar out of iron and hold it up saying 'here is some iron' few would complain 'no it isn't ... It's a BAR!'. If I have a glop of wheat gluten which I have simmered/steamed/baked/whatevered, it's still a glop of gluten even though I could correctly call it seitan. (or could I? I'd probably have to prepare it as George Ohsawa instructed to be 100% correct - it is pretty much his word anyway - but I'll go with more informal usage <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> )<br><br>
'gluten' when used as the name of an ingredient is shorthand for 'vital wheat gluten' anyway. It's usage as a synonym for prepared gluten-based products seems to be widely accepted.
 
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